Support in other languages: 

In the Spotlight: Win 8 Warrior - Iris Classon

by on ‎07-24-2014 03:48 PM (153 Views)

She's gotten the Microsoft MVP Female Leader of the Year Award and has developed a slew of apps, and is definitely able to dispense advice on health and extreme sports as well. Meet Iris, one of our latest forum users, who will be helping us out in our Windows 8 development boards.

 

iris classon software developer sq s.jpg

 

Serene:  Tell us about your background (what got you into the world of development).

 

Iris: I graduated in 2010 as a clinical dietitian after having worked as a personal trainer - I had studied natural medicine, nutrition and clinical nutrition. Although I knew early on it wasn’t the right thing for me I pushed through and opened up my own clinic. I worked myself straight into a wall and realized that I needed a drastic change. Instead of going by my ‘feelings’ like I had done when I made my previous career choice, I decided to take a look at what I’m good at- and how I wanted to work. Oddly enough ‘programmer’ was on the list, a suggestion by a good friend of mine that had commented on my logic skills. Out of all the options it seemed like the best one, and I closed down my clinic and started learning programming July 2011. I found the biggest passion of my life (without exaggeration), and (it has been) a perfect fit for how my mind likes to work. I’ve been working fulltime as a software developer since spring 2012, and I can’t imagine doing anything else. I love the work, the community, and pretty much everything about this.

 

Serene: Sounds like you have had  a lot going on. What are your proudest moments so far?

 

Iris: The moment I remember the best is my first ‘Hello World’. As tiny as that app was, (if we can even call it an app) it was the moment I realized that I can code anything. From that point on everything is just different ‘Hello World’s, of varying difficulty levels, of course.  

 

There have been several things that I am happy to have achieved, such as the first time I was invited to visit the Microsoft office and get one-on-one help with a Windows 8 app, when I landed my first job as a developer, when I was hired by Telerik, my first certificate, the first time I was asked to do a talk at a conference, speaking at TechDays, being awarded Microsoft MVP status and getting the Female Leader of the Year award, publishing my first technical book together with a dear friend (on Windows Store Apps), becoming a Pluralsight author and many more.

 

However, my biggest achievement, the one that is the most important for me, is looking around me and realizing that I’ve gotten to meet and make so many friends- with minds the size of planets- that care, are passionate and wants me (and others) to succeed.

 

Serene: Wow… you have really come a long way. So what else is there for you to conquer? What goals have you set for yourself for the next five years?

 

Iris: In the next few years I hope learn more about big data, get into machine learning, get good at testing and develop my skills further as a developer to where I can consider myself to be a senior developer. I’m doing fewer conference talks and moving more over to helping organize, just as I hope to contribute more to OSS instead of just consuming it :smileyhappy: There is one more book in the pipeline, a few Pluralsight courses and blog posts and videos. While these are specific goals, my most important goal is difficult to measure. With the tremendous support I’ve gotten my goal is to give just as much back, and prove to be a worthwhile investment.

 

Serene: We are really glad to have you in the forums. Tell us about what you will be doing around here.

 

Iris: Basically I will be around to initiate discussion and help developers with Windows 8 (and naturally also Windows Phone 8) development where I have a lot of experience- and a wide network.I’m a very passionate and energetic developer that loves sharing and discussing solutions, and I genuinely enjoy learning and teaching. So community users can expect somebody to go to for guidance, a good discussion, or just support.

 

Have a question about Windows 8 and phone app development? Give Iris a shoutout in our development board!

 

BTS1R.jpg

PHOTO CREDIT: LENOVO

 

It’s almost time for students everywhere to head back to school. Whether you are the parent of a student or a student yourself let’s take some time to investigate what you can do to stay safe online.

 

* Before purchasing security for your school needs, it would be wise to check to see what is offered by the school, or whether there are any requirements as to what type of products are preferred.

 

Protect the computer with an anti-virus that automatically updates. Not only can the internet be a dangerous place, but there is always a chance that while students are exchanging files, an infection could travel onto the computer from removable media or via a file sharing application. Most anti-virus programs or suites include the ability to scan multiple drives. It would be a good idea to make sure your security software includes website blocking of known dangerous sites.

 

For an extra layer of protection, you may want to add an anti-malware application such as Malwarebytes Anti-Malware. There is a Free Version as well as a paid Premium Version. However, only the Premium Version includes automatic updates, realtime scanning, and IP blocking.

 

Automatic updates are a big help. Make sure your computer is configured for automatic updates or to prompt for download and installation of operating system updates as well as those for anti-virus and other software. Busy students do not have time to monitor sites that list regular updates.

 

A firewall is included on current Windows operating systems. Your school may use one as well. It would be good to discuss the school's firewall policy with them so that there are no conflicts if the resident firewall on your computer is enabled. 

 

Use a hardware lock to secure the computer. Laptops usually have a slot on one side for a cable lock. The cable can be wound around a chair or table leg. Some locks come with a battery powered alarm. A combination lock is preferred by many laptop owners because it will prevent loss of a key.

lock.jpg

 

Password-Protect the computer’s user accounts and email. Using the Control Panel, configure the computer to prompt for a password when waking up from the sleep state. Check to be sure the Guest account is disabled, and do not share laptops, passwords or accounts. It is not uncommon for a student to ask for malware removal help after his friend unintentionally infected his computer while visiting a questionable website. Manage the passwords used for websites. A password manager can be a big help when using sites that require login passwords. It may be possible to find one that is portable so that it can be carried on an USB stick in order to run on Windows systems without being installed. A password manager can not only generate random-character passwords if you choose to do so, but its settings will allow the user to automatically close it after a specified time period.

 

Take time before the school year begins to research several managers in order to decide which one will meet your needs. Some of these, such as KeePass have free as well as paid versions; others may be only paid software. It would be good for the student to practice using one of these well before he leaves for school so that he is comfortable with it.

 

Below are some comparisons and reviews of password managers. Something that you might want to note in your research is whether a manager is cloud-based. In other words, will information be stored in "the cloud" or locally on the computer?

2014 Best Online Password Manager Reviews

Top 10 Password Managers

 

Consider installing a Virtual Private Network (VPN) utility that will protect the connection and allow the user to surf online anonymously. Check the school’s policy regarding these. You may need one for off-campus locations as well. There are free and paid VPN’s available.

 

Locate and recover that laptop if stolen. Many new laptops have a locator/theft recovery program installed. Find out  if this is already included on your laptop, whether the subscription has been activated, or whether you can purchase this software.

 

Beware of P2P file sharing and pirated software. These are two of the most common ways to attract trouble. Because of budget restrictions and peer pressure, students may be encouraged by friends to download pirated software or "cracked" software. It is not only illegal, but in many cases this software installs malware. Peer-to- peer file sharing is dangerous as well.

 

 Be vigilant when surfing. Advertisements that look inviting may be the wolf in disguise. Do not click on ads and links without investigating their reputation. This is especially true when using social media. Examples would be advertisements for games, giveaways, videos, music, and surveys. It would be wise to install Web Of Trust (WOT) as a browser add-on. WOT displays a colored icon similar to a traffic light next to website links to show which sites users trust for safe searching, surfing, and shopping online: green = a good site; red = bad site with a poor reputation, and yellow = proceed with caution.. The colored icons are also shown in popular search engine results, social media, online email, shortened URL’s, and others. Should someone decide to visit a site rated as having a poor reputation, a pop-up will appear asking if the user really wants to access the page or whether he would prefer to bypass it. Even children can learn how to recognize the colored icons by using WOT.

 

Secure not only the computer but the tablet and phone as well. Protect those photos, and personal data. Set a lock screen and use security measures similar to those used for a laptop. Install security applications, download apps from approved sources, and be aware of their permissions.

 

Your computer’s security is only as good as the person sitting on the chair behind the computer. If you use common sense with your technology you will stay safe and have a good school year.

 

 

References and Additional Sources:

 

10 Tips for Securing Your Smartphone

 

Cloud Computing

 

How to keep your smartphone (and its data) secure

 

Lenovo Community Knowledgebase: Free Security Software

 

Software Cracks: A Great Way to Infect Your PC

 

Web Of Trust

 

Why You Should Start Using a VPN

What’s In the Box?

by Community Moderator Community Moderator ‎06-30-2014 11:07 AM - edited ‎07-01-2014 01:35 PM (440 Views)

I asked myself this question as FedEx greeted me one afternoon in May.

 

delivery_R.jpg

 

Read more...

Once upon a time...

by Community SuperMod on ‎06-25-2014 08:34 PM - last edited on ‎06-25-2014 09:07 PM by (520 Views)

A couple of months ago, I was gifted with an IdeaPad Yoga 11s, Clementine Orange, of course!  This was the first time I had had a chance to use a Yoga for more than a few minutes, and I loved the format.  The size and weight of it was very convenient, the screen was bright, and the keyboard felt good.  I really enjoyed being able to use it in different modes, and with the touch screen, I could prop it up in my lap while I watched television at night and browse the web, Twitter and FB easily with the flick of a finger.  But I'm a die-hard ThinkPad TrackPoint fan and kept turning back to my cherished ThinkPad X301 more and more.  So I thought I would use the 11s to recruit a couple of new Lenovo fans - my nieces.

 

They were puzzled when I gave them the t-shirts but donned them quickly since they knew there was Something Good in that bag.

 

LenovoTshirts.JPG

 

Whatsinthebag.png

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  They were thrilled when they pulled the Yoga out!

 

GettingtheYoga.JPG

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Lenovo's got two new fans!

 

TickledPink.JPG

 

Seen That'sFantastic, or David Rivera around in our app development board and wondered who he is? We caught up with him over an email interview to find out more about what he does, and how he hopes to grow our latest community.

 

Serene: Hi David, nice having you hear - do tell us about yourself.


David: I’ve been involved in software development professionally for over 20 years, but my interest david.pngin computers started when I was a teenager taking some after-school computer classes, where I quickly learned BASIC programming and learned to love working with computers!  Over the years I’ve worked on many different products using many different development tools, but my main interest was always in developing software that an end user got to use every day.  Lenovo has provided a great opportunity to work on all kinds of new technology, and to be able to focus on specific interesting ones, like security and NFC.

 

Serene: Interesting background, but how did you get into area of software development?

 

David: It was a natural progression for me to move from developing software based on input from others, to having more of an impact in design and future direction using my own technical expertise, plus lots of work with customers and other technology providers.  It’s very rewarding to be involved in the early stages of a product, make significant decisions that define the direction of the product, and work with a great team to see it get done and into the hands of users.

 

Serene : What was the biggest project you have worked on so far? What were the challenges?

 

David : I’ve worked on lots of big projects over the years, but I’ll use my work as a software architect on the original Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet as an example.  It was our first enterprise-focused tablet, and it was also the first Android-based product for many of us on the team.  There were so many challenges in bringing this product to market, including coming up with build processes, working with new hardware components, and working with third party software vendors.  My focus on the product was on security and manageability, so it was very challenging – and rewarding – to explore new ideas in these areas on the Android platform.  Ultimately, we delivered a product that had its positives and negatives, but we learned a lot from the experience!

 

Serene: What are some of the things aspiring developers/architects should take note of when trying their hand at developing apps?

 

David: Our group has had an increased focus on code quality.  We’ve learned that doing all the design work up front, from the user experience to how the software components will work together, makes a big difference in delivering quality software.  Sometimes that work isn’t as exciting as actually getting to write new code, but you’ll find that doing that upfront work will make the code development experience, and debugging, go much more smoothly.  There are many good tools out there to help in doing proper design work, so use them!  It will help you in the long run!

 

Serene: What would you hope community users will ask you about? What is the expected turnaround time?


David: I’d love to hear community users proposing some new ideas or concepts they’d like to pursue, and asking me for any suggestions on how to implement those ideas or to help refine them to make great products.  The turnaround time will depend on the question – if I have to do some research on a question it may take a few days.  If there are just requests for input on ideas or concepts, then I should be able to respond within a day or two.

 

Have a question for David? Join in the conversation here

 

IN CONVERSATION: ThinkPad 8 Tablet Tweet Chat

by ‎04-03-2014 06:54 PM - edited ‎04-03-2014 06:57 PM (470 Views)

Missed the Lenovo App Development Team's tweet chat on the ThinkPad 8?

 

Here's a few highlights from the hour-long event, which saw Alysia Baker, ThinkPad Product Marketing Manager, answer questions about the ThinkPad 8 tablet, as well on as app development for the product.

 

Q: What does the Lenovo App Development Program offer to developers?

 

A: Our developer program offers a community forum, developer resources, member discounts and loaner prog.)

 

Q: What is the Quickshot cover and what kinds of apps would work with it? @midrosoftdev #lenovodev


A: The Quickshot cover incorporates "wink" functionality. The camera app loads when you put down the flap #lenovodev

 

Our customers don't have to fumble around with removing their cover and loading the camera app #lenovodev

 

 

Q: Any specific types of apps you're hoping devs will key in on?

 

A: Our Quickshot cover and camera feature is popular and there is some opportunity to expand that functionality #lenovodev

 

Q: What are some types of apps that would be great for that beautiful FHD screen?

 

A: Almost anything visual. Super bright 370nit screen makes even PP pop.

 

Q:  Is the TP8 stylus-capable? Do you think the platform would be good for note-taking? Is there already an app?

 

A: TP works w/"dummy" pens on the market. It is great for note-taking - under a lb + can hold in 1 hand

 

Pen experience is personal and is a big area of needed improvement. Screen res will be less an issue in future.

 

Q: Can you briefly speak on NFC technology and Think tablets?

 

A: TP 8 has NFC and 2 preloaded apps - QuickDisplay (Tap 2Display) and QuickCast (Tap 2Share). NFC is must on tablet.

 

For the full transcript of the event, click here.

 

Want to know more about our app development program or share tips and tricks? Join in the conversation here. And keep an eye out for other hangouts and tweetchats coming your way.

 

 

In the Spotlight: App attack: Zoltanthegypsy's first Android app

by on ‎03-09-2014 06:41 PM - last edited on ‎03-10-2014 02:08 PM by Administrator (4,228 Views)

He had never done anything of this nature before, but community moderator zoltanthegypsy rose to the occasion, trying his hand at developing an Android app on a Yoga Tab 8 we sent him. He shares his experience here:

 

I recently had my first taste of Android development.  With no prior Android experience – as either a user or developer – it was pretty interesting.  The occasion was porting a toy tcl/tk application that was running in Windows, Linux, and  Apple’s OS over to the Android environment.  More about that later.  Much later…

 

The tablet:

 

YT8_and_USB_kbd_RESIZED.jpg

 

First, thanks to Lenovo for providing the Yoga Tablet 8 for this exercise.  I’m a old-school keyboard and TrackPoint using command-line c coder, so I was a pleasantly surprised by the little tablet’s capabilities.  The touchscreen is very readable and usable and the “kickstand” is a nice feature.  It’s handy to have the YT8 propped up and visible while using an external keyboard or poking at it from an attached PC.

 

YT8_and_bluetooth_kbd_RESIZED.jpg

 

Battery life is ridiculous.  In all my playing with it, I haven’t needed to recharge yet.  I can’t give you specific numbers but in my use case it looks to be at least 10+ hours.  Nice.

 

Another very useful feature is the OTG (on-the-go) micro USB port.  The provided standard micro USB cable works for charging or attaching to a PC for file transfer.  With an OTG adapter plugged in, the tablet becomes a USB host.  The OTG adapter provides a female USB connector that can be used to attach a keyboard (nice for development work) or things like my USB flash nunchucks (pictured below) for file backup and off-line transfer.

 

YT8_and_flash_drives_RESIZED.jpg

 

Bluetooth is also available.  The Lenovo compact USB and Bluetooth keyboards worked very well with the YT8.

 

Added apps:

 

A pair of apps were immediate necessities.  I’m comfortable working from the Linux command line (a Linux kernel is at the heart of the Android environment – mostly invisible to the user) so I needed a terminal emulator.  Off to the Google Play Store and grabAndroid Terminal Emulator.  It was obvious very quickly that the stock on-screen keyboard was going to be a challenge.  Arrow keys to recall and modify previous command line entries are close to mandatory.  Back to the Play Store and add Hacker’s Keyboard.  There are some really excellent free apps available via the Play store.  Who knew?

 

Hackers_keyboard_RESIZED.jpg

 

Now it’s easy to navigate the internals of the system – hunting down file paths and manipulating things not easily accessible via the stock file browser.  I’ll admit that it was often even easier yet to attach the YT8 to my desktop PC and just use Windows Explorer (yeah, I’m running Win 7 on the desktop) to navigate the tablet’s filesystem.  The tablet shows up as an attached storage device in explorer.

 

YogaTab8inExplorer.png

 

 

 

Development guides and tools:

 

To the bookstore… some browsing and guesswork led me to Ed Burnette’s Hello Android.  For me – the totally clueless – it was a good place to start.  Looks like development is usually done with an Android emulator running on a host machine.  Faster is better. See below.

 

The book said to install Java (the development kit, not just the runtime), an IDE, and the Android SDK. Things change fast in this realm so it was a little easier than that.  The JDK SE 7 development kit comes from Oracle.  Everything else can be found at the Android developer site.  The Android SDK now includes the Eclipse IDE, so that’s a plus.

 

First impression of the Android emulator:  slow.  Really, really slow.  Unusably slow.  This can be greatly improved by installing the Intel Hardware Accelerated Execution Manager (HAXM) and an x86 Atom System Image.  These allow taking advantage of the host computer’s hardware virtualization.  Thanks to this article:  Slow Android emulator, which provided some guidance. Else, I would have been stuck with this.

 

I wanted to add the Terminal Emulator and Hacker’s keyboard to the emulator.  Another thing that you real developers already know: in order for the emulation to install apps from the Google Play Store, it’s necessary to link the emulation to a Google account.  To do that, the Google APIs must be added to the Android emulation.  Use the SDK manager in the Android IDE.  Another way to do this is to browse to the app in the store and then follow the link to the individual app’s author’s site.  There’s usually a download link there.

 

T420_Eclipse_Android.jpg

 

The project.  At last:

 

This began with a desire to try some GUI programming.  In my professional life I design hardware and write Linux and Solaris device drivers and test code.  Command line stuff.  vi and BASH.  No GUI experience at all.

 

My little toy GUI project was a Sudoku solver written tcl/tk using Active’s free community edition multi-platform tcl.  It doesn’t do anything useful but was a good learning experience.  For fun it will try to solve (but not generate) Sudoku puzzles in Arabic numerals (123…) or Kanji (四, 五, 六).

 

sudoku_kanji.jpg

 

Problem is, that’s tcl/tk.  Android requires Java.  Yikes.  The conversion could take forever since I don’t know Java.  Lenovo’s Android developer forum and AndroWish to the rescue…

 

AndroWish:

 

The Lenovo forums have recently added the Lenovo Developer Community, includingAndroid Ecosystem Developers.  I posted a n00b’s request for guidance there: [Android n00b] how to begin?  No idea how such a basic request would be received.

 

I got an almost immediate reply from Christian Werner, the author and maintainer ofAndroWish.  This is a wonderful project that’s brought tcl/tk to Android.  With his encouragement – he even caught a typo in my code that had been lurking there all along – I quickly had my little toy program running in the Android emulator and on the Yoga Tab 8.  Maybe I can put off learning Java for another year or two :)

 

At this time it’s necessary to launch my little program from AndroWish’s command line.  The next phase of the project will be to convert it into an actual Android app.  Christian has provided tools and a how to:  HelloTclTk.

 

Many thanks to Christian Werner for his help, to the nice people at the comp.lang.tcl newsgroup for getting me going in the fist place, and to Lenovo for providing the Yoga Tab 8 – and a place to post and share.

 

Z.

 

..oh, almost forgot…

 

T420_and_YT8_RESIZED.jpg

 

Have experience in app development or want to know more about this from like-minded individuals? Join our app development community here!

In the Spotlight: First thoughts on the Flex 15

by ‎02-18-2014 07:25 PM - edited ‎02-18-2014 07:37 PM (636 Views)

Having owned several Lenovo products, forum guru ColonelONeill had the opportunity to put a Flex 15 through the paces recently, and he shares his experience in this review:

 

The IdeaPad Flex 15 hails from a totally different family tree compared to my current set of laptops (I have the X61t, W520, and previously, the T400), making the first consumer laptop to pass through my hands in a long time. Ergo, it had high standards to compare itself against, but it did not disappoint.

 

1.jpg

 

(Flat Flex: How the Flex 15 looks when displayed flat on a table.)

 

The build quality on the IdeaPad Flex 15 appears very good; it felt quite solid. The hinges were quite stiff (two-handed operation is required), and went the full 300 degrees with no problems. Battery placement between the hinges was quite clever  too. The texture on the lid is really slick, although dust seems to stick to it for some reason. A little disconcerting was the extent to which the lid twisted, but it presented no artifacts. In fact, the machine will support itself from a corner of the lid ThinkPad-style with no problems.

 

 

2.jpg

(Flexing the Flex 15 - how the system 'folds')

 

Physically, the Flex 15 isn’t too svelte a machine with a footprint exceeding the W520, albeit at about half the thickness. Nevertheless, the machine is fairly light, and slips into a backpack easily. The black-grey color scheme I quite like, much better than the fruity orange alternative that Lenovo also offers.

In terms of port selection, the IdeaPad Flex 15 comes with one USB 3.0 port, two USB 2.0 ports, an HDMI output, a cleverly designed Ethernet jack, a half-depth SD card slot, and headset port. Additionally, the power button can be found on the right side of the machine, along with what appears to be a reset button and a physical volume rocker switch

 


4.jpg
(From the top: ColonelONeill's X61T, followed by his W520 and the Flex 15)

 

 

Initial setup went smoothly as with all Windows 8 systems, and it quickly became a usable system. The combination of Windows 8, UEFI, and an SSD made for really short boot times. Note that for those interested, there is also an HDD option available.

 

The display of the Flex 15 was shipped with a significant blue cast, but a quick eyeball calibration with Windows’ calibration wizard got the color temperature on par with my W520’s display (using someone’s Spydered profile). Brightness was very good, although black levels were quite high. As long as you’re not aiming for color accurate work, the screen will do fine. However, I must say that the screen resolution was a little low for such a large display nowadays; hence, workspace suffered accordingly. Standard glossy screen gripes apply.

 

5.jpg

 

Out of the box, there was a wacky Synaptics driver that didn’t seem to do the job right. It seemed to fail to reject movement noise, especially when pressing down on the touchpad. Updating to the latest available ones (navigate to support.lenovo.com and select Drivers and Software) helped significantly. Physically speaking, the touchpad was large and roomy, with pseudo-physical buttons. Being a TrackPoint person and still being uncomfortable with touchpads, I soon switched to using the touchscreen.

 

On this note, the 10-point touchscreen behaved well at all times, and was quite responsive under Windows 8. No hassles there. Switching the laptop into stand mode disables the keyboard (but not the touchpad, possibly due to custom drivers), and exposes the touchscreen as the sole interface device. The on-screen keyboard worked as expected of touch-based devices, but this, personally, I felt isn’t the best solution for data entry.

 

 

The keyboard was surprisingly good. While it isn’t quite a ThinkPad keyboard, it is a solid contender; I found no significant areas of flex, and there was a consistent response from all keys. Typing was fairly accurate, although the key throw was a little shallow for personal preferences. Median typing speed was around 120WPM on this machine. Leaving F4 and F5 as their usual selves in the function keys is a neat idea, although it didn’t respond to Ctrl+F4 and Ctrl+F5 as expected.

 

 

Battery life was top-notch; the Haswell ULV chip draws a nominal amount of power under standard operating conditions. Typically, it will run around 8-10 hours with basic office tasks (browsing, IM, document editing). Intriguingly, having USB devices plugged in drained far less power relative to my W520 under the same situation.

Performance-wise, the ULV is more than enough for office-oriented tasks and light media consumption. The integrated HD4400 will run Counter-Strike Source plenty fine with nearly max settings (less anti-aliasing) at the native 1366x768 at a solidly playable 50+ FPS. In fact, this machine can run Crysis at around 30 FPS native resolution, which is quite playable,  albeit it being somewhat of an eyesore that can’t really be called Crysis.

 

7.jpg

 

(Color Crysis: How the game looks on the Flex 15's screen.)

 

Under nominal office conditions, the cooling system usually runs passively, occasionally spooling up to push out some accumulated heat. Running games pushes the chipset’s power consumption (as measured by HWMonitor) up to its rated 15W, and requires the fan to run continuously to maintain an equilibrium temperature of around 52 degrees Celsius. A bit annoyingly, the fan’s sound profile isn’t very good; the noise generated is quite noticeable in a quiet room, especially when it first kicks into gear.

 

8.jpg

 

All in all, the IdeaPad Flex 15 is a solid machine that gets the job done. Personally, it felt quite paradoxically like a part desktop replacement, part Ultrabook, and fills both segments quite well. Performance is adequate, and battery life is stellar, which makes it great for taking to lectures or libraries. Build quality feels great, though only time will tell how long it stands up to the rigors of student life. One key suggestion is a better 1920x1080 display option, solving the biggest gripe I have with a machine of its stature.

 

Have a Flex 15 and have tips on how to improve user experience?Join in the discussion here.

 

 

How I spent my winter vacation (or CES2014 with Lenovo!)

by Community SuperMod ‎02-03-2014 08:28 PM - edited ‎02-03-2014 08:27 PM (1,228 Views)

CES - Vegas-CES-Badge collage.jpg

Lenovo invited me to come along to CES with them again this year, and naturally I said an enthusiastic yes! For a geek, being able to go with a hardware manufacturer is a dream come true! Being behind the scenes, talking to all the Lenovo employees and other advocates and visitors, handling all the new products – all of these make for quite a rush!  I’ll try to compress a whirlwind week of experiences into a few paragraphs and pictures.

 

First, the products:

 

CES - Products.jpg 

 

Of course, the first thing we went for was the new ThinkPad X1 Carbon and the ThinkPad 8.  Both of them were beautiful, solid systems that we spent a lot of time handling.  Being such a fan of the classic keyboards, I was surprised to find out how much the new X1’s Adaptive Function row appealed to me.  The ThinkPad8 is a beauty and fit so nicely in my purse.  If it hadn’t been for that tether…

 

In the pic above, you can also see the keyboard of the gaming notebook with its red backlight.  I typed on it for a little while and really liked the feel of the keys.  The phones, while not (yet) sold in the USA were very nice.  The one I’m holding in the pic felt good in my hand.

 

Here's a few of the people I spent the week with:

 

CES - People.jpg

 

Meeting everyone is even better than seeing and holding the products.  There’s Lee who sat down with us while we were eating lunch one day and told us all about how Lenovo tests dust; Nazia who was our hostess and made sure we made it from event to event on time; Mike who manned the X1 Carbon table and let us walk around with untethered X1s; Gavin and Kevin taping the unboxing video; David, another advocate, who was as awed as I was with the experience; left to right, there’s Gavin, Garick (another advocate) and Rod who is over Social Media in Singapore and finally me, actually holding a new X1 Carbon.  Lenovo did a great job of including us in so many activities and making sure that we had access to anything we needed to make our experience great!

 

Gavin called this a Social Media Caper:

 

CES - Caper.jpg

 

This is something Lenovo did in Times Square earlier last year and reprised in Las Vegas.  This was so much fun!  We walked down the Strip from the Venetian to the Bellagio meeting people along the way and signing them up to win a Yoga Tablet that had been autographed by Ashton Kutcher.  Here’s a few of the people we met along the way

 

And, finally, the food:

 

CES - Food.jpg

 

I think the pictures say it all - we did not go hungry!

 

All in all, the 5 days went by in a flash!  We walked for miles, we ate until we were stuffed, we saw Penn & Teller and Cirque du Soliel’s Ka and met so many new friends.  Lenovo put on a grand party for their customers and advocates, and I can only say a fervent thanks for letting me go along for the ride!

Just In: A brand new sandbox for app developers

by ‎01-22-2014 07:13 PM - edited ‎01-23-2014 05:32 PM (563 Views)

Noticed a new section within our forum community?

 

dev.jpg

 

Yep, that's right. We have opened up a brand new space for folks out there who are interested to know more about this area, and for you to share your knowledge.

 

Krista Summitt, Chief Storyteller for Lenovo Dev, describes what this space will be for:

 

"We’re striving to build a global community of developers who are stoked about creating apps for Lenovo PC+ devices and Lenovo Innovation Technologies.

 

Peer to peer support is king. As with the main hardware boards, support, info, and moderation comes from the community, not Lenovo staff.

 

Sharing  any "knowledge base" types of content you have created that would help the community.  

 

What the Windows Developers Board Is For. We are obviously looking for Windows desktop and Win8 metro development conversations (duh! I know) , but here are some specific items we'd love to hear about from you:

 

  • Transition from developing Windows desktop apps to Windows 8 "metro style" apps. What has that been like, how have your workflows changed, etc.

 

  • Okay, so game developers, we love love love you! Fist bump, you rock, keep it coming... That said  Win 8 video, music, business, productivity, social media, developers, STAND UP!  Lenovo wants YOU participating in this community!  Post here and let us know what you are working on, how we can help, etc.

 

 How We Roll Here…

 

In general ,the vibe on these boards will be transparent, useful, challenging, and non-marketing-speak-ish.  We try to save the “unique selling propositions” and “corporate-speak” to the marketing crowd.  We try not to take ourselves too-too seriously as well. "

 

So make yourselves at home. Join in the conversation here!

In the Spotlight: Off to CES 2014!

by Community SuperMod on ‎01-05-2014 04:31 PM - last edited on ‎01-05-2014 04:59 PM by (543 Views)

Packing for CES2014.JPG

 

 

Lenovo has graciously invited me to come along to #CES2014 with them again this year!  Last year, I got to meet Andreas Gotthelf from here in the forum as well as Gavin O’Hara, David Roman and many of the other Lenovo employees.  This year, David Gross, Chris Karrafa and I are teamed up to represent the advocates, and I’m looking forward to meeting both of them.  Like Andreas did for me, I’ve been sharing tips with them for the trip (stay hydrated, wear comfortable shoes, get your Twitter account warmed up).

 

If you followed the CES2013 board last year, you know that Andreas and I had pretty much free-rein in the Lenovo Lounge where all the products were on display, and we did our best to take pictures of every square inch of every product to share with you.  David, Chris and I will be doing the same thing this year.

 

Last year, the Helix was the device that I was so attracted to – going back to it again and again to hold it, seeing how it felt in my hands, poking at the screen, checking out the latch mechanism.  I can’t wait to see what will be unveiled this year.  I’ve seen the phone announcement that went out a couple of days ago, and I think there will be more announcements this afternoon (writing this on Sunday morning).

 

What are we going to see?  Will there be a new multi-function device building off the Helix form factor?  How tiny have they made the desktops?  Just how much ThinkPad is there in the ThinkPad Yoga?  As a co-founder of the 7-row-keyboard fan club cult, what is going to be my reaction to the new “buttons” in the TrackPad?  What is Lenovo going to announce that will excite me?  I’ll be sharing all those answers and more here and on Twitter, FB, Instagram and G+.

 

I’ll keep an eye on the CES2014 board in the Special Event section of the forum for questions from you guys and will try to get answers for you!

 

Have a question for Jane, or want her to take pics/ ask our execs a particular question? Post in the CES 2014 board!

Happy New Year!

by ‎01-01-2014 05:19 PM - edited ‎01-01-2014 05:20 PM (439 Views)

lenovo_spotlight_header.png

 

Happy New Year!

 

2013 was a very interesting year indeed for our forum support community with the rollout of the newest Windows operating systems, on top of the usual new product and line launches, particularly the network storage devices and our expansion into the phone and tablet market.

 

We wish to take this opportunity to thank each and every one of you who have gone on this learning journey with us, especially the moderators and gurus, as well as Microsoft MVPs, who continually help us out with maintaining a conducive environment for healthy discussions.

 

The spirit of Community in our forums is truly amazing.

 

One of the threads that I have come across that really showcase this is this thread started by Synergy, who signed up especially to share his experience upgrading his system to Windows 8.1. As the thread progressed, more and more community users came in to verify and share additional insights they gained from the experience, including SpideyMan, Mikey94025 and Dieschote.

 

This was teamwork at its best.

As we start another year, we wish to thank you in advance, and we really look forward to your continued  positive participation in our community!

 

Best,

 

Serene

 

Was helped out by someone outstanding in our forums and wish to give this person or persons a shoutout? Post here

Happy Sixth birthday to us!

by ‎12-01-2013 08:48 PM - edited ‎12-01-2013 08:50 PM (901 Views)

lenovo_spotlight_header.png

 

How quickly time flies – it’s that time of the year again – our forums’ anniversary, and what a ride it has been for us as a whole.

 

As you know, ours is a peer-to-peer technical support community run by volunteer moderators and gurus, who form the backbone of our family, as not only do they help alongside you with the questions, they also help us keep the community going by ensuring that discussions are kept on track and conducive for exchanges.

 

As we celebrate our sixth birthday, we catch up with some of the moderators and gurus, who share a bit about themselves and get their thoughts on how the forums have changed or evolved the past six years.

 

Ajkula66 (2007)

 

In 2007, even before the English community went live I was invited by Jane L as I was (and am still) active in other ThinkPad forums, even before the official Lenovo Forums were opened to the public.

 

The same reason drew me to stay here and on other platforms – a simple love for the ThinkPad.

 

As time passes, I stayed on because I found myself being able to help others, and this urge to do so has kept me going over time.

 

Looking at the forums over the past six years, I must say that the community has evolved tremendously, and I am hoping it will just continue to grow and flow on its own.
 

Lead_org (2008)

I got onto the forums by chance, when I had an issue with my ThinkPad, and was not able to solve the issue on my own. I did a search on the internet, and the Lenovo forums came up as having a solution. I tried the proposed solution and it solved it and later, encountered another. I then registered as a forum member and posted a question on the new issue to ask for help. I then stayed on because I found myself being able to help others despite having a limited knowledge then of ThinkPads, as most of the problems posted were simple and could be resolved quite easily (if you knew what you were doing.)

As my knowledge on the subject of ThinkPads grew, my compulsion to stay and help others likewise grew stronger. Visiting this community to help others has become somewhat of a hobby for me.

 

topmahof (2010)

I came looking for advice in setting up my first ThinkPad.  I started first at ThinkPads.com and found a reference to the forums.  I saw some posts that I knew the answer to.  My first solution made me feel good, so I tried to help out more.

 

Over time, I find this community and its members have become family, and which I belong to.

The community has evolved big time over the years.  I saw Lenovo weaning away from IBM and standing on its own two feet.  It continues and I'm just caught up in it.  I'm just happy that I can be a part of it in my own small way. All the changes I've seen have all been for the good.  There will always be a few growing pains along the way, but that's life.

 

Zehnsteine (2011)

In May 2011 I bought an IdeaPad Y560p laptop at a retailer in Thailand, but unfortunately discovered a sound dropout fault in this machine. Searching the net I found a thread in Lenovo Forum concerning this dropout issue... but without a solution, i posted asking for help anyway.

Next I contacted Lenovo Thailand Tech Support and discussed the problem with the very competent and helpful support-tech. A few days later he called me with the good news, that he found out that an older version BIOS would solve the sound dropout and then downloaded this BIOS file to my machine... problem solved... I was impressed by the excellent fast service and was very happy.

Subsequently I adopted the above mentioned Lenovo Forum thread just to help other Y560p users, who suffered from this very sound fault, by providing them with the BIOS version I had received from Lenovo Thailand. At that time there was no BIOS offered on Lenovo’s driver download page for the Y560p model laptop. A new fixed version BIOS was only available about six months later.

I was then later invited to become a guru, and found it to be fun to answer users’ questions in the forum and offer possible solutions to problems with their Lenovo laptops.

As time passes, I find the Forum community is steadily progressing for the better and  I think it's very good the way it is.

 

Victorhdiaz (2012)

I got my hands on a Lenovo K1 tablet two years back and was fascinated by the discussions in the English community.  I was aware there was a sister Spanish language community and then decided to lead a discussion on the device there.

 

As time passed I made more and more friends as I met more people from all over the world through this platform. While I am glad to have helped the community, I would like to say thank you to the people who have helped me as well.

 

As time passes I honestly find the questions getting more challenging, with as technology changes, and different issues surface. That said, I am very happy to help in whatever ways I can here.

 

Have some idea or suggestions about how our community looks and feels? Tell us your suggestions here. And thank YOU for being a part of this awesome family as well.

Yoga Tablet 10 - Unboxing and quick review [PICS] - Updated!

by Community Moderator on ‎11-10-2013 06:34 PM - last edited on ‎12-05-2013 10:24 AM by Community Moderator Community Moderator (5,811 Views)

yt10.jpg

 

I just received one of the Yoga #betterway tablets to try out and review. :smileyhappy:

Join the discussion >>> HERE and I might choose YOU to receive a Yoga Tablet of your very own! An early holiday present! :smileywink:

Read more...

Here's to a #betterway: The Yoga Tab Unveil

by on ‎10-29-2013 09:59 PM - last edited on ‎10-30-2013 01:18 AM by Administrator (1,991 Views)

Posting on behalf of agotthelf (Andreas Gotthelf)

 

Pic 1 %28Small%29.jpg

 

The long wait finally comes to an end. Lenovo just revealed their newest member to their Yoga family, the Yoga Tablet.  The new Yoga Tablets, which come in 8" or 10 " (hence Yoga Tab 8 or 10) have 1.2 GHz quad core processors, 1GB Ram, 1280x800 pixel display resolution. So regardless of what screen size you need, Lenovo has got a device for you.

 

Pic 2 %28Small%29.jpg

You don´t have to carry much weight with you also. The Yoga Tablet 8 weighs 401 grams and the 10.1 inch model just 605 grams.(note: for WiFi only models; the 3G models weighs approximately five grams more).

 

Because of the special hinge design the amount of force needed to hold it in your hand is minimized. It's so easy to carry the tablet around.

 

Pic 3  %28Small%29.jpg

 

I think absolutely great is the news about 18 hours of battery life on the new Yoga Tablet. So will have enough time to consume, create and share that content you want.

 

As you know certainly know  the Yoga family is famous because of their flexibility and their different modes. The new Yoga Tablet offers  three modes.

 

The tablet mode, I´m sure everyone knows how to use this.

 

The second mode is called Hold mode, which is designed for reading stuff, looking at your photos or just to share content with your friends.

 original.jpg

 

The last one is called Tilt mode and  is designed for web browsing, gaming and typing.

 

Pic 5 %28Small%29.jpg

 

On the back of the tablet there are two slots: the right one is for a 64 GB micro SD card and the left one is a micro SIM card slot, which offers the opportunity to connect to 3G networks as well.

The Wifi only version will hit the market right now and  the Yoga Tablets with Wifi+3G will come end November.

 

The sound coming from the stereo speakers is great, because it is enhanced with Dolby Digital Plus DS1. I watched some videos on Youtube and have no complaints at all. The sound is clear, crisp and loud enough.

 

If you need the tablet for writing your stuff, it is recommended that you then order the Bluetooth 4.01 keyboard, which is only available for the Yoga Tablet 10. You can charge it in only three hours. It´s only 5 millimeters thin and sports a smart Sleep and Wake function in order to save battery time.  If you carry it around with your tablet, you can easily attach it to your tablet screen and it works then as a screen protector.

 

Pic 6 %28Small%29.jpg

 

A lot of accessories, like sleeves or colorful back covers are available, too. So it is really easy to customize your tablet or fit a cover to a color that you like at a particular moment. There will be a wireless display adapter available too.

 

Pic 7 %28Small%29.jpg

 

All in all, I think both models offer a powerful way to consume, create or share the content you want to. The price for the Yoga Tablet 8 is 229 € and for the 10 inch model it is 299 €. The keyboard for the 10 inch model cost 99 €.

 

So it is really an affordable device which fits in every mode of your life.

 

Best and greetings from Milan

Andreas

 

Have a #betterway in which you use your tablet? Share your nifty trick here and who knows? A surprise may come your way.

A #betterway... You're Invited...

by Community Moderator on ‎10-21-2013 06:54 PM (770 Views)

We're getting close!

 

Mark the date & time for the #betterway live event: http://www.youtube.com/LenovoVision :smileyhappy:

 

betterway5.jpg

 

And... don't forget to join in the discussion! You might just be surprised by a #betterway! :smileywink:

A #betterway is... On The Way!

by Community Moderator ‎10-08-2013 08:08 PM - edited ‎10-23-2013 09:45 AM (3,160 Views)

The ThinkPad turns 21!

by ‎10-06-2013 07:20 PM - edited ‎10-06-2013 07:21 PM (513 Views)

Time really whizzes by and guess what? The ThinkPad just turned 21 years old on 5 Oct 2013!

 

Here's a quick trip down memory lane for all you supporters of the brand!

 

 

 

Helping us help you better

by on ‎09-08-2013 11:26 PM - last edited on ‎09-26-2013 10:05 AM by Administrator (1,072 Views)

Welcome to the Lenovo Forums Community!

 

As you may be aware,  ours is primarily a peer-to-peer technical support community where knowledge is shared and contributed by fellow product users, who through their use of our various products, lend their expertise and experience in answering the questions you may have, or issues that you may encounter.

 

So how should you ensure that your query gets answered as quickly as possible?

 

  1. Search for existing discussions/ knowledge based articles.
  2. Provide details about your product
  3. Be specific about the symptoms
  4. Don't bump your thread for attention - try adding updates on what you have tried or are trying now
  5. Come back and tell us what worked - mark the right answer as an accepted solution.

 

  1. Search for existing discussions/ knowledge based articles

    Before you post,  try search to see if someone in the community already posed the same question or highlighted an issue similar to yours - there may already be a solution! This helps the community (and you) to see if other troubleshooting tips had been offered (and which you could use yourself). In many instances, we have had community users report that they had found existing solutions within the discussion threads and our Knowledge Base.

    To do so, look for the Search box on the top right corner of the Lenovo Forums homepage.  Type in the question or keywords associated with your search.

 

search.jpg


As you type, a list of related discussions or articles will then appear on the dropdown menu:

 

search2.jpg

 

search3.jpg

Click on SEARCH once you are done.

 

You can also choose to pull Search results from the Community threads or discussions, or from our Knowledge Base articles, or refine your Search results through the various filter options by clicking on Advanced Options.

 

search6.jpg

 

search4.jpg

 

2.     Provide details about your product

 

Say you searched , but found that no one else has the same issue. What you can do now is to register an account with our community so that you can post your question.  (Or just log in if you already have an account)

During the registration process, we ask that you tell us your country of residence, so that our community may provide you better and more suitable suggestions on resources closest to your location.

 

Once you registered and verified your account (check your inbox of the email address you provided during your registration; click on the link sent there by us), use the following guidelines when you are posting:

 

-          Tell us what laptop/ desktop you are using and its operating system

 

If you are asking about, for instance, an issue regarding a T420 laptop, look for the ThinkPad board. In this case, post inside the Discussion of T400 / T500 and newer Txx series ThinkPads  section. Tell us if you are using Windows Vista/ 7/ 8? 32 bit or 64 bit? Linux? Ubuntu? This gives our community a much better idea of the platform on which you are running your system so they can help diagnose your problem/ issue. If possible, try also recalling and providing information on when you had updated the drivers of your machine (if ever.)

 

type.jpg

 

P.S We ask that you do not 'hijack' existing discussions - if you have a new issue related to an old topic, please start a new thread instead.  If you have a similar symptom but a different model system,  please start a new thread but include a link to the discussion you found that may be related.  This will help others in the community "connect the dots" .

 

 

3.         Be specific about the symptoms, and include them in the thread title.

 

By choosing a good thread / topic title that is specific for your system and your symptoms, you will increase the odds that other members of the community will respond to your thread.  This matters for several reasons.  First, it helps others understand the system and issue while scanning the board.  Secondly, it helps others who are using search within the community.  Lastly, it helps other customers who are using Google, Bing, or Yahoo find your question (and hopefully the subsequent solution) even if they weren't specifically looking for this forum.  

 

As you begin posting, tell the community about your system and the issue you are having.  Try to recall what were you doing when the issue or problem occurred? Specifying this shortens the time needed for our community to make a diagnosis and help you carry out troubleshooting. 

 

The following is a pretty good example of what to do:

 

type2.jpg

  

  1. Don’t just bump your thread for attention

     

     We understand your frustrations when it seems as if no one has the answer to your question. But returning a few hours later and typing in ‘BUMP’/ ‘UP’ or any similar comments in response to your thread doesn’t really help. Re-read your post. Are there additional details you can provide so the community can help you? Were there other things that you did after you posted that did/ did not work?  

     

    Instead of "bump", try posting a follow on comment with additional details that you might have remembered, more troubleshooting that you have tried in the elapsed time, or perhaps links you found to similar discussions elsewhere in the forum or even on other sites.  This moves your thread back to the top, gives the community more information to help solve the problem, and shows that you are actively working on the issue.

     

    Remember ours is a peer-to-peer technical support community – everyone is here to help!

     


  2.  Come back and tell us what worked!

    Discovered a solution to your issue yourself? Post your answer. Or if someone had responded to your thread with something that worked, mark that as a solution.

    You doing so will help someone else out there who may face the same situation. 

 

Hope the above helped you in getting your answers more quickly! Also, if there is a special someone in our community who went out of his/ her way to help you, or provided an excellent tip, give them a kudo, and let us know in the Forum Housekeeping board!   

 

Avid gamer and community guru  test drives the C540, and shares his thoughts on gaming on the  touch-enabled system here.

 

j4.jpg

 

The C540 is an immediately likeable machine, with an appropriate form-factor, and a humble, muted physical design. Out-of-the-box experience was a quick and smooth experience, and Windows 8 makes beautiful use of the hardware; gestures were snappy, and programs loaded quickly. It was almost dead silent; you can barely hear the noise of the fan and hard drive even in a silent room.

 

 

One of my first orders of business was to try surfing the net using the touch-screen instead of a keyboard-mouse. Commands missed much more rarely than I expected, which I later found out was due to Windows 8’s fancy new fuzzy targeting algorithm. Desktop Firefox behaved a bit strangely with touch; half of the time it couldn’t figure out if I was selecting text or scrolling the page.

As a desktop/media station crossover, it seemed appropriate to install XBMC. The HD2500 integrated graphics handled it splendidly, and responses to touch gestures were very fluid. After tweaking the screens calibration a bit, it became a great media consumption device.

 

j5.jpg

 

The i3-3120 clocks in at 3.40 GHz on two physical cores, so I figured it was time to try some heavier tasks. As such, I loaded up one of my favorite games, Supreme Commander: Forged Alliance. This game is quite demanding on systems, despite hailing from the technologically ancient year of 2007. The graphics chip faltered here, and I had to turn visual effects way down to make it playable. However, the simulation speed (entirely CPU based) never dipped for a second.

 

Furthermore, seeing as touch-screens weren’t mainstream in 2007, the game was built entirely for keyboard and mouse interaction. Nevertheless, I set out to play exclusively with the touch-screen controls. Testing the waters, the game responded fairly well to touch input, zooming in-and-out with pinch zooming, and box selecting units successfully. Tap-and-hold also properly indicated a right-click. With the basic commands out of the way, my first issue was with the lack of the idea of ‘hover’ with touch-screens, which made it difficult to place a building in an exact location. Zooming didn’t trigger a little more often than I would’ve liked, but was generally well-behaved. Certain actions still had to be keyboard-triggered though (e.g.: holding Shift is necessary to issue waypoint orders). I’d like to see Lenovo include a configurable on-screen button overlay program, the same way physical buttons are emulated on mobile devices.

 

In the end, I did get two main takeaways from the effort. The first is that playing with a touchscreen isn’t quite feasible. While the gestures were smooth and well-behaved, holding ones hands up to a vertical screen for an hour is quite an exercise in endurance. Secondly, the surface of the screen too much friction for repeated dragging; it burns the surface of the finger. A different surface texture would be nice, or perhaps a screen protector.

 

j1.jpg

 

Putting the games away for productivity, the conventional keyboard comes back into play. For extended typing, the touch-screen is less than practical. Saying that, typing accuracy is pretty good with the on-screen keyboard (despite the awkward angle). The keyboard that ships with the C540 types a lot like the keyboard on my X100e, which is a good keyboard all around. While nothing to write home about, the stock keyboard and mouse don’t get in the way.

 

All in all, the C540 is a good media, work, and even light gaming machine. It offers lots of bang for the buck, and has no major flaws. It would have been nice for a discrete graphics card option, but that’s just the gamer in me talking. Ultimately, it’s a great choice for a shared family computer.

Lenovo Touch Moments: Touching the future with the Lenovo IdeaCentre B540

by ‎07-22-2013 06:33 PM - edited ‎07-23-2013 05:35 AM (1,666 Views)

Technology journalist Michael Archambault, otherwise known as Marcham93 in our forums, experiences, for the first time in his life, gaming and writing on a touch-screen desktop, and tells us how the B540 has improved the way he consumes digital content here:

 

Michael Archambault

  

A few weeks ago, Lenovo shipped out their multimedia IdeaCentre B540 desktop to my front door; since then, I have been putting the 23 inch touch screen all-in-one desktop through its paces. To my happiness and Lenovo’s honor, the B540 is an incredible system to work with.

 

m1.jpg

 

When I go to sleep at night I leave my machine in Sleep mode for fast access in the morning. As a technology journalist I need to have access to the latest content as fast as possible and the IdeaCentre’s Intel Core processor and 8 GB of DDR3 RAM make that a reality.

 

After I pull myself out of bed and start up the IdeaCentre I’m welcomed by the touch friendly start screen of Microsoft’s latest operating system, Windows 8. Before testing out the IdeaCentre B540, I had never interacted with Windows 8 on a screen size of such magnitude and let me tell you – it makes all the difference.

 

As I scroll through my morning news, whether via an RSS client or an official publication house’s application, the B540 responds perfectly to my touch and never lags behind. The edgeless design of the unit is not only beautiful, but also allows for Windows 8 edge gestures to be picked up correctly and this makes the machine all that better to use.

 

m2.jpg

 

Being able to interact with a large touch screen monitor is like a dream from science fiction movies of long ago come true; the Lenovo B540 helps to connect consumers and make those dreams a reality. Scrolling through content, checking my email, and interacting with friends is only a touch away – literally.

 

One of my favorite uses of the touch screen, outside of work purposes, is playing some of the hot new games from the Window’s Store. You really haven’t played or experience Angry Birds and Jetpack Joyride until you’ve played them on a gorgeous touch screen display such as this one.

 

When I’m not playing games, the IdeaCentre B540 has certainly helped pick up my productivity and get me what I need more quickly. Touch is the future of user interaction and Lenovo has certainly nailed it down here. Swiping through my never-ending list of emails, flicking through PowerPoint presentations, and working in Photoshop have become an enjoyable experience.

 

Let’s not forget that this machine is a multimedia All-In-One loaded with an NVidia GeForce 615M 1GB graphic card, a whopping 8 GB of RAM, and a speedy 7200 RPM 2TB hard drive. If I want to watch a movie or go dungeon questing in World of Warcraft – this machine can handle it. I was quite surprised at the level of detail the built-in speakers achieved and for once, I felt I didn’t have to demand the speakers be thrown aside for external ones.

 

m3.jpg

 

My only wish for a future iteration of the system, would be the inclusion of a more powerful graphics card. The NVidia GeForce card placed within the Lenovo B540 is a mobile card designed for laptops and while it can handle games, as I mentioned above – I want to be able to up the detailed settings as much as I can. Hopefully Lenovo will either add a more powerful GPU down the line or we will see an all-in-one touchscreen desktop from their gaming line of IdeaCentre PCs.

 

That said, all in, I was excited to try out Lenovo’s latest all-in-one desktop and I was not disappointed. The unit’s 23 inch touchscreen could not be overlooked and to my surprise – improved my productivity. Couple the touch features with an NVidia graphics card and Dolby Advanced Audio and you’ve got the ultimate machine – Lenovo’s IdeaCentre B540 Desktop.

 

Want more? Here's his walkthrough review. Read Michael's review on the B540 in Windows Phone Central!  What was YOUR experience? 

 

[video]

 

 

In the Community Spotlight -Yoga 11S: The New Guy gets put to the test

by ‎07-14-2013 10:28 PM - edited ‎07-14-2013 10:34 PM (2,414 Views)

Lifelong ThinkPadder Jeremiah lands an IdeaPad for the first time, a Yoga11S, and comes out so impressed by this new guy on the block that before he wrote this review, actually thought of running his car over it to see if the convertible can survive.

 

Here's what he thinks about the Yoga11S:

 

Jeremiah: 

 

I was never a fan of the IdeaPad series.

 

Having been a loyal and steadfast supporter of the ThinkPad line, the Yoga 11S was the first Idea system I ever owned. I’m impressed so far, as the Yoga screams quality and innovation.

 

‘Mature’ is the last word I expected to use to describe an innovative product; maturity just doesn’t fit. Nevertheless the Yoga 11s exudes maturity. It is strange, considering this is the first product cycle of its life. But we aren’t talking about product cycles really, are we? Remember Pokemon? This, to me,  is the final form.

 

The Yoga’s purpose is simple - it’s engineered to be an instrument marrying work and play, a union of what you want and what you need. If you had just one device to exist in our connected world, this is it. I’ve used it for about a month as a replacement for every gadget in my bag of tricks (besides the cell phone) and found it did the trick.

 

 I’m not going to talk about software much in this review, when it really comes down to it Windows 8 it is pretty much the same across the board. What I’m deep diving into is the hardware. I tested a Yoga 11s with the following specs:  i7 3689Y, 256 GB SSD, and 8 GB DDR3.

 

The hardware reminds me of the ThinkPad line. The outside of the Yoga is more striking than I’d expected, covered in a finish that I can only describe as metal leather. This, I find, is very reminiscent of the original Pocket Yoga design. And this feature itself is enough to start a love affair with this laptop for me.

 

jw1.jpg

 

Palmrest

 

The palmrest was the next thing that I immediately noticed. See the grainy texture going up and down? Better than a ThinkPad. That’s right. I said it. No horizontal movement or temperature change. I really didn’t think that was possible. No more freezing palms in winter, or sweaty mitts in summer. As a former service manager for a computer repair shop I’d like to think that I’ve handled close to 100% of the laptops out on the market and this is THE BEST palmrest I’ve ever put my hands on. I did not expect this much attention to detail put into in what I had thought in the past to be a low-end product. This one feature forced me to rethink my entire view of the Idea line.

 

jw2.jpg

 

The Keyboard

 

While my love for and loyalty remain with the classic Thinkpad keyboard (7-rows FTW), I recently made the switch to a 6-row and I must say it was easier than I expected. I’m not going to feed you a load of drivel and tell you that the Yoga’s six-row keyboard is the bomb. It isn’t. It’s not meant to be. Key-presses are clean, travel is short and the layout is good, really good for an 11” Laptop. I had zero issues with drivers when changing to different modes, even when running multiple hefty programs in an attempt to throw it for a loop. It reliably turns on or off when flipping the screen around (which I do with much gusto). All in all, the keyboard is easy to use and is very quiet. 

 

jw3.jpg

 

The TrackPad

 

The Yoga’s trackpad is large – it’s a tiny bit smaller than that of an average laptop hard-drive.

 

Clicks, taps and gestures are all well recognized. I have no complaints here; the surface is smooth yet tactile. The keyboard is the same – operation of and on it is smooth - just flip the screen around and the view/ orientation is adjusted accordingly.

 

The Ports

 

These are the ports available on the Yoga 11S: 1 USB 3.0, 1 USB 2.0, 1 HDMI out, 1 SD/MMC reader and a charging port. No more than you need, except for an Ethernet port. I miss that, but if you pressed me, I couldn’t tell you a time over the past month that I’ve needed it. Weird, as at one point in time I would have considered it indispensible. 

 

jw4.jpg

 

Speakers

 

My biggest complaint: speakers. At first I thought it was something wrong with Netflix. Then I was sure that the stock Windows 8 audio driver was used in the system. I poked around for a good half hour and I came to the realization: my cell phone is twice as loud as this laptop. That said, fidelity over headphones was great but the laptop absolutely cannot be taken to a party without a set of external speakers, with it emitting WEEB WEEB WEEB instead of WOB WOB WOB (embarrassing, much?). The fan is in the back near the speakers so it’s not overly loud but kind of like the speakers. Bah-dum-dum-tish!

 

jw5.jpg

 

Camera

 

The webcam works great – with a resolution of 720p it’s one of the best I’ve ever used. I used the Yoga during the G+ Hangout with Lenovo if you caught it last month. The picture and colors were extremely clean and tracking was good.

 

 

Download/ Wi-Fi speeds

 

I downloaded Steam and Portal 2 within 20 minutes over Wi-Fi.. Download and upload speeds average just above 40mbps down at home (throttled from the cable company).  At Startup or Resume the Wifi reconnects to my router before I can get to the setting. The Yoga’s range is impressive; reception deteriorated only after a distance of 60 ft from my Netgear N600. I took the Yoga with me to a local coffee shop and had a excellent connection as it was more than enough for me to have a video chat with my Dad on Hangouts really quick, and I could surf the web at the same time.

 

The Screen

 

The screen is very colorful, and a super bright 320-Lux. That’s way higher than the industry’s ultraportable average of 234-Lux. Deep, rich color and an excellent contrast ratio make up for the screen not being 1080p. The 10 point Touch is fluid and responds very well to stimuli, even to my toddler’s grubby little hands.

 

Better yet, I was impressed by the viewing angles provided by the laptop as it was wider than expected, and the IPS screen is fantastic for gameplay. 

 

jw6.jpg

 

Graphics and Gaming

 

Intel’s new 4000 graphics chip is, IMHO, excellent or at the very least it runs Portal 2 like a boss. I ran everything at the highest setting the screen would allow and enjoyed smooth- as- butter play. I actually got a little sidetracked from this review and played for three to four hours. Oops. Then not 24 hours later, one of my wonderful friends gifted me Borderlands 2 on Steam. (Why do they do this when I have work to do?)! I dived into setting up the GPU settings for Borderlands and was delighted to run everything at the max but bullet decals and anisotropic filtering. All I’ve seen up to level 11 is very minimal lag during splices between cut scenes and Boss Battles. Now it’s time to see if this sucker sets my pants on fire…

 

Well thankfully I didn’t need a new pair of pants (heat dissipation is nominal), but I did grab a pair of headphones for Teamspeak 3. More players equals more loot, don’t you know! 

 

jw7.jpg

 

Durability

 

I was initially very concerned about the build of the Yoga; as soon as I got it I was determined to break it, thinking that it did not deserve to sit near my ThinkPad collection so I let my three-year-old use it. I have thrown it (seriously!) and still do so into my car every day on my way to work, slammed the lid down, flexed it hard moving the screen back, and dropped it from the kitchen table to the floor. Twice.

 

And the machine still works beautifully.

 

There’s not a lot else I can do to the Yoga without throwing gross neglect or negligence into the picture. Color me impressed.

 

I really don’t think this is an IdeaPad; I am convinced that this is a ThinkPad in sheep’s clothing.

 

Know what it’s missing? That little red dot I love so much.

 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Discovered a nifty trick on our Touch-enabled laptops, such as the Yoga11S? Share your expertise and knowledge in our community!

Meet the new guy: Yoga11s

by on ‎07-01-2013 02:48 AM (506 Views)

Missed our first ever Tweetout on the Yoga11S? Or the Google Hangout we had?

 

Fret not – here’'s a quick summary of the questions answered by our panelists and participants, which include the likes of Jeffrey Witt, who is Lenovo’s Director of Product Reviews, and forum advocates Nate Sarbin and Andreas Gotthelf. We also had Lenovo advocates such as David Gross, Jeremiah White, Chris Collins, tech blogger Michelle McGraw, and even Intel come in to answer questions on the new Yoga 11S.

 

To view the video of the entire Hangout, click on the video below.

 

 

Burning questions

 

What are the key differences between the Yoga11 and Yoga11S?

 

All three Yogas – the 13, 11 and 11S offer the ability to contort and be flexible, due to the innovation of the Yoga hinge, where testing took a long time (systems were put through more than 25,000 times of opening and closing).

 

The Yoga 11 is powered by Nvidia Tegra 3 that runs at a maximum clockspeed of 1.3GHZ and features an integrated graphics processor. It runs Windows RT and runs apps designed for the new Windows 8 interface. It comes with 2GB RAM weighs about 2.79 lbs (1.26 kg) and has a 11.6 inch glossy, five-point multi-touch screen. It does not come with a vent.

 

The Yoga 11S, on the other hand, is powered by the Integrated Intel HD4000 processor and runs full Windows 8 (or, if you want, Windows 8 Pro). As a result of this, it weighs slightly heavier and is slightly thicker than its earlier counterpart as the Intel CPU requires vents. The Yoga 1S has a 10-point capacitive multi-touch display with IPS technology with  300-nit, 1366 x 768 resolution and it also offers up to 8GB of RAM.


The display glass for the Yoga 11S, as shared by Jeffrey Witt, is also thinner, yet sturdier and stiffer due to the One-Glass-Solution, which allows touch sensors to be embedded.

 

What are the various modes in the Yoga good for?

 

The Yoga folds into four modes – the laptop mode, the tent mode, stand mode, or tablet mode.

Advocates shared that they liked using the Yoga in tablet mode when they are on the go, especially watching videos whilst in commute. Video viewing and web surfing are also easier, according to Nate Sarbin, in stand-mode, especially when aboard planes. Michelle McGraw, whose favorite app is AllRecipes, loves to use the Yoga in tent mode as this allows her to follow the instructions listed in the various recipes easily, and even watch the videos while cooking for her family.

 

Just got your hands on a Yoga and have a nifty tip for our community? Share your knowledge here.

Hangout with us for Yoga11S this June 17 (9 PM EST)!

by ‎06-11-2013 04:57 AM - edited ‎06-17-2013 01:20 AM (3,576 Views)

We Are Social 20130606 Save the date v003.jpg

 

Missed our first ever Tweetout event on the Yoga 11S?  Fret not - here's yet another chance for you to learn more about our latest offering.

 

JOIN US for our upcoming live hangout on 17th June, 9pm EST. 


Lenovo team & insiders will be going deep on the new Yoga 11s – Features, Modes, Evolution..and a lot more. 

Users can send in queries via Twitter or G+ during or before the session using @Lenovo,#lenovohangouts 

Learn more about Yoga - www.lenovo.com/yoga 

A little info about our hangout participants:

Jeremiah White 
Having been always fascinated by computers and all things related to the internet, avid ThinkPad supporter Jeremiah White beefed up his computing knowledge  though his experiences  in computer sales, and tinkering with and troubleshooting other people’s systems. Jeremiah now works in the field of Heavy Equipment Construction and spends much of his time helping out other users in the various Lenovo social media channels.

David Gross 
“I have had a passion for technology my whole life. Continuously excited to see how it changes, grows and to what new limits it can be pushed. I love to get my hands on every new piece of hardware I can and test it to its limits. Keeping up with both the computer and mobile spheres I have seen how they have changed over my life and how they are starting to converge in many ways. This love for technology has driven me to pursue a degree in computer science and I hope to move into programming.


Another area of interest for me outside of technology is music. I enjoy rock/metal and have more recently taken an interest in house/dance music though I am open to all types of music. I played guitar for several years in a band and had a blast doing it.” 

Michele McGraw
Michele McGraw (ScrappinMichele) is the  creator of ScrapsofMyGeekLife.com, a lifestyle technology blog offering daily commentary, advice, reviews and shared experiences of how her real life and the digital domain connect.  Michele’s motto is “Digital, not diamonds and gadgets, not gold.” She can be found on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and Instagram.

Nate Sarbin
Currently is the VP of operations for a small biotech startup in central Virginia focusing on diabetes therapy, and hopes one day to find a cure. Loves working for a small company as this still allows him to be the techie geek jack-of-all-trades. He faces  new challenges daily, which keeps him young, at heart  at least :smileyhappy: 

Nate also finds time somehow to help out in the Lenovo Forums English Community, offering tech advice in his capacity of a Community Moderator.


Meet the new guy: #Tweetout on the new Yoga11S

by ‎06-05-2013 07:21 PM - edited ‎06-06-2013 12:58 AM (1,181 Views)

 

 Yoga 11s Tweetout Image - final.jpg

Want to find out more about the Yoga11S?

 

Make a date with us this Jun 7, 6 pm EST (To check the time the event is taking place in your area, please visit this site.)

 

Our English and German community moderator, Andreas Gotthelf (@agotthelf) will be one of the four featured guests, and will be sharing his experience with the Yoga11S' predecessor, the Yoga 13, during this event.


Founder and maintainer of LockerGnome, Inc, Chris Pirillo (@ChrisPirillo), and Lenovo Insider Chris Collins (@CollChris) will also tweet about how the Yoga machines fit their lifestyles, and how to get the best of this nifty tool. And better yet, if you have a question about the Yoga's processors, tweet your questions to @Intel then.

 

Best of all, twitterers with the best answers and responses to questions tweeted out during the event stand to get surprise Lenovo treats!

 

So make a #Yoga11S date with us during  #LenovoTweetout @lenovoforums @lenovo

 

New forum feature: Search before posting new topics

by ‎04-11-2013 07:53 PM - edited ‎04-11-2013 08:00 PM (4,908 Views)

 

Getting answers or references from existing topics just got easier, as we rolled out a new forum feature today.

 

Previously, users had to do a keyword search to search discussion topics within the forum.

 

search.jpg

 

Now, when you want to start a new thread, type in the key words and a list of posts similar to your subject will appear, thus saving you valuable time and effort.

 

 posts.jpg


 
 

We are continually trying to improve on your user experience on this forum; should you have a brilliant suggestion, go to the Forum Housekeeping Board and post it there.


And oh - do continue to visit our guidelines regularly to get yourselves familiarised with our community rules, which may be updated from time to time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hangout on Air, with security experts

by ‎03-27-2013 01:31 AM - edited ‎03-27-2013 02:12 AM (1,784 Views)

My heart skipped several beats last year after I  ran a scan on my laptop, only to be greeted by these results:

 

virusscan.gif

 

The scan eventually revealed I had a grand total of 22 threats.

 

That explains why my laptop was behaving weirdly- programs would close by themselves; I couldn’t launch some browsers, and it took forever and a day to boot up.

 

I have always ensured that my system was protected , religiously downloading updates and running scans on my machine. But evidently this wasn’t enough as some got through (which I suspect was a result of my surfing habits.)

It thus pays to be in the know about what threats there are out there.

 

Recently we held a Google Hangout with two anti-malware and security experts, Kevin Haley, of Symantec Security Response, and Aryeh Goretsky, of ESET North America, and this was hosted by Lenovo Forums English Community Lead Cleo Lee.

 

The session saw the experts sharing their knowledge of what ‘ransomware’ and ‘watering hole attacks’ are, as well as talked about the additional security features in Microsoft’s latest operating system, Windows 8.

 

What was most interesting was how increasingly, people are putting their systems at risk because of their behavior and browsing habits. Criminals now have a bigger playground as there are more and more social media platforms and apps.

 

All it takes is a wrong click, on an email or chat attachment, or on a dubious link, on that free giveaway from your favorite coffee joint and your system,  your identity, your address and bank accounts could be compromised.

 

So if you missed the Hangout, fret not. Click here to learn more about keeping your systems safe.

 

 

About our Featured Speakers

Kevin Haley – Director of Product Management for Symantec Security Response 

Kevin Haley is Director of Product Management for Symantec Security Response, where he is responsible for ensuring the security content gathered from Symantec’s Global Intelligence Network is actionable for its customers.  

During his 12 years at Symantec, Haley has leveraged his security expertise in the development of the company’s antivirus solutions for endpoints and mail servers, and in creating network and system management solutions.  Haley managed a global team of technical product managers who evangelized Endpoint Security Products and were responsible for field enable and technical training for SAV, SCS, SEP v11.0 and SNAC 11.0.

Before joining Symantec, Haley was part of the OpenView group at Hewlett-Packard, working on the company’s software distribution tools.  Prior to Hewlett-Packard, Haley was a product manager at Sun Microsystems, where he managed the development and delivery of network and server software for Solaris on Intel.

Aryeh Goretsky – Distinguished Researcher from ESET North America

 

Aryeh Goretsky is the Distinguished Researcher at ESET, a global security provider.  His areas of research include analyzing emerging threats, observing customer behavior, and helping to design and test the next generation of ESET’s software.  Aryeh joined ESET in 2005 to manage its support department.  The following year, he moved to managerial role within its research department and was promoted to the position of Distinguished Researcher in 2009.

 

Aryeh started his career in computer security as the first employee at McAfee Associate in 1989 and has worked at a variety of hardware and software companies.

  

Aryeh is a Microsoft MVP, and is very active not only in the Lenovo Forums Community, but also on other technical support forums sharing his expertise and his knowledge of security, antivirus, Windows and networking.

 

logo-eset.pngsymantec logo.jpg

 

Have a question about malware? Join the discussion on our Forum’s malware and security board!

I got my hands on a Lenovo IdeaPhone!

by ‎03-06-2013 01:05 AM - edited ‎03-06-2013 05:35 PM (5,484 Views)

Most of us would not have even seen a Lenovo IdeaPhone, much less touch one. Lucky, lucky buddinggeek then, who got hold of one - the K860 and he shares his review of the smartphone here.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sometime during the first week of January this year I managed to get my hands on one of Lenovo’s smartphones – the Lenovo IdeaPhone K860.


vijay1.jpg

 

The Lenovo IdeaPhone was previously known as the LePhone and at present, sales of the phones are only available in some parts of the world such as China, India and Russia.

I was excited to be able to test out this handset as this was the first time I had held anything but a laptop or PC by Lenovo.



vijay2.jpg

 

The IdeaPhone K860 comes with an Exynos 4412 Quad Chipset, a quad core cortex GPU pumped to 1.4GHz and Mali 400mp, which is the world’s first multi-core GPU from ARM. This provides 2D and 3D acceleration with resolution performance scalable to 1080p, and makes it easy for users to multi-task without lag.

 

The phone is fitted with a 720p high-definition screen, 1Gb RAM and 8Gb (expandable) storage. It also runs on a 2250mAh battery and has a 8 mega pixel rear camera and with dual LED flash.


Being an Android user I found navigation to be familiar and fast, as Lenovo stuck close to the way other Android devices work, such as the use of the swipe and pinch gestures, as well as use of the Home button.  However, one distinction was made – users can customize the placement of apps on the home screen and preset most frequently used apps and widgets to appear in what is called the ‘Idea Desktop’.

As this was the first time I was using a Lenovo phone, I wanted to really put it to the test. I carried out the AnTuTu benchmark test (one of the most used benchmarking suites for mobile platforms.), and the phone, which runs on Vanilla ICS, returned a score of 15,009. This was quite decent when making a comparison against other devices of similar specs.

benchmark1.png

Apart from the standard AnTuTu benchmark test, I wanted to see how some other functionalities like HTML, graphics and hardware worked compared to the other phones out there with similar specifications. I then carried out the Vellamo mobile benchmark test from Qualcomm, which gauges a mobile device’s performance in three categories: browser performance on HTML5, graphics, and other tests like multi-touch and advanced video tests. For the full test list you can visit Vellamo’s website here.

 

ugh2.jpg

 

One of my favorite parts in the test suite is the Touch analyzer benchmark, which is interactive. It tests the phone’s touch sensitivity while taking certain parameters such as refresh rate, display resolution and latency into consideration. Needless to say, the phone passed the test.

I really like that the phone has a five-inch IPS display with a 720 x 1280 pixel resolution, and with a pixel density of 294ppi. This makes reading e-books a breeze – since I got the phone, I’ve been on a reading marathon. The glossy IPS screen, coupled with high pixel density, also makes watching full screen videos fun, making it an ideal traveling companion.

 

lenka.jpg

 

However, there was something missing from the phone, which I hope the brand will look into incorporating into its line of smartphones - LED indicators to alert users about social media notifications, missed calls or incoming text messages. I feel this is really essential as else, the user will have to keep checking the phone to see if anything had been missed.

Oh - it is also fun to game on the phone;; games such as Grand Theft Auto, FIFA and the preloaded Asphalt HD run very smoothly and well. For fans of the Lenovo brand such as myself, the discovery of the hidden Easter egg in the driving game (SPOILER ALERT: the cars are Lenovo-branded) gave me such a thrill.

 

lenovocar.jpg

 

All in, I am pleased with how the K860 looks, feels and operates. Now, if only there could be more noise about Lenovo’s smartphones in my country!

Have a question about Lenovo's IdeaPhones? Pose them here for our community to answer!

Your top picks of Lenovo products from CES 2013

by on ‎02-05-2013 11:58 PM - last edited on ‎02-06-2013 11:38 AM by Community Moderator (7,422 Views)

So we recently held a poll about which Lenovo products unveiled at CES 2013 got you excited and drooling.

 

An here are the top three results of the poll! 

1. The ThinkPad Helix

 

2013-01-04_Helix-3a.jpg

 

Coming in first place is the beautiful Helix, which performs as well as it looks! You get a business Ultrabook™ married with the mobility of a Windows 8 tablet. And battery life is impressive as well as, with up to 10 hours on keyboard dock.

 

Better yet, it comes with a digital pen option for users who want to sketch, write, and navigate with precision. And it's even got a ide-view 1080p 400-nit IPS multitouch Corning® Gorilla® glass display. Check out the full specs of this monster of a machine here.

 

P.S. We aren't the only ones loving this. The Helix garnered many awards, such as

 

• Tech Radar Best of CES Awards 2013, Best Laptop
• Gottabemobile, Best of CES 2013 Best of Show
• Black Enterprise 2013 CES Best in Show, Best Laptop for Business
• Laptop Magazine Best of CES 2013 Finalist: Best Laptop/Convertibles
• Tom’s Mobile Innovation Award
• PC Pro Best Tablet of CES
• Wirecutter CES 2013, Best Windows 8 Hybrid/Tablet
• Digital Trends Best of CES 2013: Computing
• The Verge Awards: Best PC hybrid
• GDGT: The Best and Most Interesting Gadgets from CES 2013, Laptops

 

And oh - resident advocates JaneL  and Agotthelf got a chance to hold this awesome machine at CES 2013. Click here to see what they had to say about it.

 

2. IdeaPad Yoga11s and Lenovo smartphones

 

The IdeaPad Yoga11s

 

lenovo-desktop-yoga11s-closed-view.jpg

 

 

Both the IdeaPad Yoga11s and our newly released smartphones were equally loved by the participants in our poll.


The Yoga 11s, like its predecessor the Yoga 11, is a convertible and can be used in four modes - clamshell laptop, tent, slate and stand. The differences between the two? The Yoga 11s' Nvidia Tegra 3 chip has been replaced with an Intel Core - i processor. This means users are able to run more Windows 8 apps on their systems, like other standard Ultrabooks. There is also an additional USB 3.0 port of the newer system, which makes the transferring of files even quicker.


Click on this link to find out more about the Yoga 11s.

 

The Lenovo K900

 

Lenovo_K900.jpg

 

The Lenovo K900 has a 5.5 inch 1080p IPS capacitative touch display, runs on Android Jelly Bean, and has a Gorilla Glass 2 screen. It even has a 13-megapixel front camera, with an f1.8 focal length lens. The 2-megapixel front camera also boasts of a wide 800 viewing angle.

 

The S890

 

S890.jpg

 

 

The S890 is a 5-inch smartphone with a qHD (540 x 9 60 resolution) screen. It has an 8-megapixel back camera and a 0.3-megapixel front camera. The S890 runs on Android 4.2 (Jelly Bean). 

 

Lenovo LePhone S720

 

S720.jpg

 

The Lenovo S720 has a 4.5-inch, five-point multi-touch IPS display. The front camera is 8-megapixel, and it has a 1-megapixel front camera. The phone runs on Android Ice Cream Sandwich.


The Lenovo P770

 

P770.jpg


The P770 has a 5-megapixel camera, and runs on Android Jelly Bean. It has a 4.5-inch qHD IPS screen, and its battery can last up to 29 hours of usage on a single charge.

 

The Lenovo A800

 

A800.jpg

The Lenovo A800


The Lenovo A800, which comes in black and white, has a 4.5-inch IPS, 5-point touchscreen and a unique textured back. It has a dual-core processor that operates at 1.2GHz and a battery with 20 hours of talk time. It also has a 5-megapixel front camera.

 

3. The IdeaCenter Horizon

lenovo-ideacentre-horizon-front-view-main.png


The 27-inch IdeaCentre Horizon not only provides users with a multi-mode option, it even comes with three awesome gaming accessories to make your gaming experience even better. It can be used as a desktop or a table PC!

 

To keep abreast of the release dates for the above products, do stay tuned to announcements made in www.lenovo.com.


In the meantime, do check out our advocates' report in the Special Events board!

CES 2013 - Roundtable with David Roman, Lenovo SVP and CMO

by Community Moderator ‎01-15-2013 11:01 PM - edited ‎01-16-2013 12:44 AM (2,906 Views)

On the first day in Las Vegas, JaneL and I had the chance to take part in a meeting with Lenovo´s Chief Marketing Officer, David Roman. Before our meeting, we had asked the users in our forum and fans elsewhere to pose some questions for us to ask David in the meeting. Below are David´s answers to our questions. Please note: I am far away from being a stenotypist, so some topics/ answers might be missing here.

 

20130108_121844 (Small).JPG

 

What are customers looking for? 

 

Customers are looking for a great experience - computing solutions thus play an important role in achieving this. To meet these demands, we don't just look at rolling out new hardware and software. We had gained a lot from the takeover of IBM's hardware division and from making other acquisitions like Medion in Germany, which for the latter, helped to create powerful gaming systems such as the PC X700.

 

We are focusing more and more on software and other solutions, too. An example of this is the Lenovo Cloud Services, which we introduced last year at CES 2012. This in turn led to Lenovo´s acquisition of Stoneware, a maker of cloud-computing software to meet the demand for cloud-based technologies, which will continue to rise.

  

How would you describe the future market?

 

New technologies are being rolled out, including voice recognition, touch, gestures, or cloud services. More innovative devices will be produced, such as the likes of the new convertibles that make the PC experience more fun. We have, for example, transformed the user experience from that of a 'personal' computer, to 'interpersonal', as seen in the table PC Horizon.

 

Tablet sales at the moment are skyrocketing - but the normal PC is not dead; our production of ultrabooks and other products thus places Lenovo in a good position against its competitors. The market constantly demands new and different products. Our goal is therefore to move quickly and develop new products. We believe in innovation, as well as authenticity - key features of Lenovo´s personality, to make products Do for Doers.

We go for stuff that really works, taking into consideration functionality and not just the 'cool' factor. The new Yoga 11s and the new ThinkPad Helix are examples of this.

 

How would you describe Lenovo´s strategy in general?

One of our goals is to be successful in coming up with new products and even categories, or attaining growth in more markets. We are also aiming to more effective in these new markets. Our products are also targetting the youth and to do so, we will have to be consistent in what we do. There is still work to do, for instance, in the naming of our new products.

 

Lenovo is really a global company with ideas and products coming from different places of the planet. We think of the company as a whole. We are moving into a new era where we have the next generation of international enterprises, and we are looking at every country to see what products and services make sense there. This will take time, but we have made a lot of progress.


Why has Lenovo decided to split the business into two parts - the Lenovo Business Group and the Think Business Group?

We believe in planning long term and this is a matter of efficiency. We have become pretty large so our organization must evolve too, that we not only focus on products but also be cohesive. That’s the idea behind the new facilities in the U.S.

The challenge is that there are now too many products and we have the situation where sales and support don’t scale. Premium and consumer have different expectations and different needs with regard to support and supply. An end-to-end responsibility within a particular business unit ensures the ability to create the type of products our customers expect and appreciate.

Is there some sort of a master brand behind this restructuring process?

No, there is no master brand. We are just recognizing the reality of groups becoming business units with end- to- end responsibilities, and not different brands in general.


20130108_123856 (Small).JPG

 

We have to send a BIG “Thank you” to Lenovo´s Global Social Media Team for being our host  during one of the greatest consumer electronics show in the world. It was truly a very unique, emotional and exciting experience for us to be a part of their team!

 

Photo credit: Special thanks to Craig Goldstein for taking these awesome pictures!

 

 Andreas Gotthelf


For more details on our new products and concepts shown during the CES 2013, go to our Special Events board here.

About the Author
announcements
Community Spotlight

She's gotten the Microsoft MVP Female Leader of the Year award and is a technical evangelist. Meet Iris Classon and who will be helping out in our app development board when she's not out doing extreme sports or conquering the world.

Lenovo Trade-In Program

Lenovo Assisted Search

Help Us Help You! Community Forum Survey

Lenovo APOS

Labels
polls
What is the most important criterion when it comes to choosing your desktop? (Choose one)