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NoneSuch
Blue Screen Again
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎01-29-2018
Location: US
Views: 11,085
Message 1 of 7

Yoga 720 SSD upgrade to 2TB?

I bought a 720 with a 500 GB SSD. I want to upgrade to a Samsung 960 Pro 2 TB. Has anyone successfully performed this upgrade? If so, what problems did you encounter and how did you get around them?

Sr Support Specialist
Posts: 8,344
Registered: ‎11-30-2015
Location: PH
Views: 11,062
Message 2 of 7

Re: Yoga 720 SSD upgrade to 2TB?

Hi NoneSuch,

 

Greetings.

 

OEM specifications does say up to 1TB, but I noticed this ad from walmart.

"MichaelElectronics2 has upgraded the computer to offer the product with configuration as advertised..." 2TB PCIe SSD (Solid State Drive) with resellers warranty.

 

Hope this helps answer your query while we wait for others members feeback.

 

Regards



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HaSHK
Serial Port
Posts: 14
Registered: ‎12-15-2017
Location: SA
Views: 11,020
Message 3 of 7

Re: Yoga 720 SSD upgrade to 2TB?

For me. I did try upgrade my yoga 520 with ssd and I failed. I used 2 different brands from crucial and kingspec company and both are not recognized on bios. I realize that both ssd I own are m.2 NGFF so, I think if it is new NVME m.2 it may recognize in bios. However, 2TB nvme is too expensive. I do not recommend to pay for unknown result.

NoneSuch
Blue Screen Again
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎01-29-2018
Location: US
Views: 10,948
Message 4 of 7

Re: Yoga 720 SSD upgrade to 2TB?

Success. The Samsung Pro 960 2TB M2 form factor SSD works flawlessly.

 

Here's an overview of the problems I encountered. There is only room for 1 drive internal to the laptop. The drive interface is an M2 formfactor with an NVME PCIe connector/protocol. That means that to clone the drive there has to be an external drive to accept the data and that's where the next problem came into play. The laptop uses an M2 form factor PCIe NVME drive interface for which no one makes a USB drive housing but, fortunately, there is a work around. There are a number of PCI bus adapter cards that will host the PRO 960. So, the solution to this problem is to clone from the system drive to a temp USB drive and then clone from the temp USB drive to the final 2 TB destination drive. Here's how I did it.

 

1) Clone the original drive to a USB temp drive. I tried a couple of free disk cloners before finally breaking down and buying Acronis for $50. Using this software I then cloned the 500 GB system drive to a 1 TB SSD I had left over from a previous lap top. Acronis not only dealt with the size differences but got all of the small disks on the system drive cloned without any problems what so ever. The presence of these multiple disks on the system drive was the issue that motivated me to buy Acronis. The various free programs I tried were all happy to get one of the disks but left me unsure that they were getting all of the hidden and system disks as well. Acronis got them.

 

2) Clone the clone onto the 2TB Samsung Pro 960 from the temp USB drive. I bought a PCI extension card that could handle the PCIe NVME interface M2 form factor SSD for $15. There are a lot of these around. Just be sure that the one you get has the Key M PCIe NVME interface support. I wanted to use Acronis again but ran into a small issue. Acronis had been installed on my laptop and the program wouldn't do a clone on the desktop until either a new license was acquired or the existing license was transferred. I elected to transfer the license and fortunately the Acronis people had the foresight to make this a nearly painless process.

 

3) Install 2 TB SSD in Lenovo: Lenovo doesn't use the usual Phillips head screws. It uses a very small Torx screw which by good fortune I already had a tip that fit the screws perfectly. Once all of the screws in the case back were removed I used my thumbnails to get under the plastic to separate the front from the back. The old system drive was then easily available. A single screw held it in place and the drive swap took maybe as much as an entire minute to accomplish. 

 

4) Test the system: On repower there was no difference whatsoever from a normal boot. No increased time. No warning messages. Nothing. The system operated in exactly the same fashion as before except now it has a 2 TB system drive instead of a 500 GB one.

Community SeniorMod
Community SeniorMod
Posts: 6,937
Registered: ‎01-13-2008
Location: US
Views: 10,944
Message 5 of 7

Re: Yoga 720 SSD upgrade to 2TB?

Nice work and thanks for the detailed report Smiley Happy

 

I've also been looking for a USB->NVMe adapter but no joy - so far and maybe not ever.  I also have a PCIe/m.2 NVMe card that I haven't needed to use yet.

 

A question (or two...) why not clone or image to the external drive, install the new SSD in its final resting place, then transfer the clone or image to it right there in the target machine?

 

I'm also an Acronis fan and user.  The bootable rescue media (flash drive) made from a licensed/installed version should do the clone or image recovery OK.  That's one of the things it's intended for.  Shouldn't have to go through the license transfer.

 

Z.


The large print: please read the Community Participation Rules before posting. Include as much information as possible: model, machine type, operating system, and a descriptive subject line. Do not include personal information: serial number, telephone number, email address, etc.


The fine print: I do not work for, nor do I speak for Lenovo. Unsolicited private messages will be ignored - questions and answers belong in the forum so that others may contribute and benefit. ... GeezBlog

 

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NoneSuch
Blue Screen Again
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎01-29-2018
Location: US
Views: 10,933
Message 6 of 7

Re: Yoga 720 SSD upgrade to 2TB?

Do I understand you correctly? You're asking why not:

1) Clone from system to USB.

2) Install 2 TB into system.

3) Clone from USB to system?

 

Umm, how? Where' s Acronis running from? Lenovo doesn't support booting from an external DVD and the 2 TB as of yet unwritten to drive won't boot and even if it did and it had Acronis on it you still can't go from USB to system while system is in use, can you?

Community SeniorMod
Community SeniorMod
Posts: 6,937
Registered: ‎01-13-2008
Location: US
Views: 10,926
Message 7 of 7

Re: Yoga 720 SSD upgrade to 2TB?

1) Run Acronis on the 720 booted on the original drive.

 

2) Use the tools menu to make bootable Linux-based rescue media on a flash drive.

 

[edit] If the SSD is in RAID mode (not sure about the 720) it may be necessary to create WinPE-based rescue media.  How Acronis bootable media handles NVMe drives in RAID mode isn't something I've checked into.

 

3) Use Acronis to clone to something external, or save a full backup image to something external.

 

4) Install the new drive in the 720.

 

5) Boot the Acronis flash drive.

 

6) Use the booted Acronis to clone or recover from external to new drive.

 

7) Boot the newly recovered OS Smiley Happy

 

8... hang onto that rescue media and maybe the saved image.  They can both be very handy in the future.  The above is how one would recover from an image to a corrupted/replaced drive.

 

BTW: I'd expect the 720 to boot a properly-configured external DVD but flash is easier.

 

More BTW: If the system is new and you're not worried about saving anything user-installed or user-confgured, use "make a recovery drive" in Windows tool bar search box to... make a Windows recovery drive.  You can boot that to return a system to OOBE, and it should work fine to install the OOBE OS on the new drive too.

 

Z.


The large print: please read the Community Participation Rules before posting. Include as much information as possible: model, machine type, operating system, and a descriptive subject line. Do not include personal information: serial number, telephone number, email address, etc.


The fine print: I do not work for, nor do I speak for Lenovo. Unsolicited private messages will be ignored - questions and answers belong in the forum so that others may contribute and benefit. ... GeezBlog

 

  Communities:   English    Deutsch    Español    Português    Русскоязычное    Česká    Slovenská    Українська   Polski    Moto English

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