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pcglaw
Token Ring
Posts: 17
Registered: ‎01-14-2009
Location: US
Views: 1,923
Message 1 of 10

How to change primary hard drive

I am going to be getting the M93P Tower with the standard 500 gb hard drive.  I purchased a Seagate 240 gb SSD which I would like to use for my software (windows 8 etc) and a 1 T Seagate 600 hybrid SSHD drive for my data.  Can anyone tell me where I might find the instructions to set up the new drives?  Thanks.

SeniorGuru
Posts: 2,222
Registered: ‎06-13-2013
Location: US
Views: 1,901
Message 2 of 10

Re: How to change primary hard drive

I purchased my M93p tower with the 1TB drive.  Privately I also bought a Samsung 840 Pro 256GB SSD drive (which is 2.5") along with a mounting adapter so as to be able to install it in the 3.5" internal cage as a second drive.

 

I planned to leave the original 1TB spinner drive exactly where it was in its 5.25" slot, copying the OS (on C and "system reserved"), i.e. the spinner originally) over to the SSD where a new C would then be. Actually, I partitioned the SSD into C and D, and initialized the 1TB spinner into four partitions E, F, G and H.  There is a second SATA6 connector on the motherboard that I plugged the SSD into (using a SATA6 cable that I bought), and there is an available SATA power connector coming off of the 280W power supply that connects to the SSD.

 

Using Macrium Reflect to do the imaging BACKUP (from spinner) and RESTORE (to SSD) it was trivial.  Using Partition Wizard to do the partitioning it was trivial.  Getting into the BIOS to change the boot drive sequence to point to the SSD as "first", as well as setting the new "system reserved" partition on the SSD as "active", it was trivial.

 

If you wanted to pull the stock 500GB spinner out of your M93p to replace it with your Seagate drive, it's just a matter of removing it from the 5.25" cage it is installed in.  Look for the "hardware maintenance manual" for M83p/M93p on the Lenovo support site to show you how to do it, but it's really easy... as long as you have a 5.25" mounting kit if you want to put the new drive back in the same slot as the power and data cables would just need to be pulled off the old drive and stuck onto the new drive.  Or, there's room in the 3.5" cage for two drives there if you want to put it there.

 

The PDF is here:  http://download.lenovo.com/ibmdl/pub/pc/pccbbs/thinkcentre_pdf/m83m93p_hmm.pdf

 

NOTE: once you copy "system reserved" and the OS C-partition from spinner to SSD, set the BIOS boot sequence (if your boot SSD is not on the first SATA6 connector but rather on the second) and set "active" partition to the "system reserved" partition of the SSD, when you boot for the first time I installed the Samsung Magician software that came with the SSD drive.  This allowed for automatic reconfiguring of Windows to optimize running from an SSD, doing "over provisioning" of about 10% of the drive for performance, etc., as well as offering to change various settings in Windows now that you're not running from a spinner.  This was the first SSD I'd ever used but it seemed reasonable for me to "optimize for performance".  The rest was automatically done by the Samsung Magician software.

 

The SSD partitions themselves are automatically "aligned" because that's how Windows 7 works, and Partition Wizard thus automatically puts partitions on drives so as to be "aligned".

pcglaw
Token Ring
Posts: 17
Registered: ‎01-14-2009
Location: US
Views: 1,891
Message 3 of 10

Re: How to change primary hard drive

Thanks for that wealth of information.  Does the case come with an enclosure for a SSD drive or where can I get it?  Thanks again. 

SeniorGuru
Posts: 2,222
Registered: ‎06-13-2013
Location: US
Views: 1,875
Message 4 of 10

Re: How to change primary hard drive

The case itself does not include a mounting kit or adapter for either 3.5" or 2.5" drives.  You need to buy your own hardware depending on the size of the drives you bought and which of the two internal drive cages you're going to use, for a 3.5" device or a 5.25" device.

 

As I explained, I simply left the delivered 1TB spinner drive where I found it... mounted in the 5.25 slot.  I purchased this 2.5"-to-3.5" adapter to mount the Samsung 840 Pro into an available 3.5" slot. I'm not sure I understood from the Hardware Maintenance Manual how to actually install the result, because it didn't appear that it was actually wide enough  to fill the opening.  I thought it was described as a "slide-in locking" arrangment, but I couldn't get it to work.  Perhaps this was the wrong adapter kit.

 

Anyway, I ended up managing to attach it securely to the cage in its slot using one screw tightened firmly.  The sides of the adpater were "sitting" on the bottom of the cage and then screwed to the side of the cage, so it's definitely in there securely.

 

In retrospect perhaps something like this other adapter http://www.amazon.com/Kingwin-Inch-Internal-Drive-Mounting/dp/B0064VP70W might have been a better choice. I know I previously used this other similar adapter http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811993005 in another machine for a 2.5" internal drive, and had no problem whatsoever using four screws to fasten it to both sides of the 3.5" cage slot I put it into.  Or, maybe I just didn't understand how I was supposed to fasten the "adapted" SSD drive into the M93p tower cage with the adapter kit hardware I bought.

 

In any event it's up to you to get whatever hardware you need.  You will also need an 18" SATA6 data cable (I assume our SSD is SATA6), to connect to the second available SATA6 connect socket on the motherboard.  As I said earlier, there is already an available length of SATA power cable with a spare SATA power connector on it coming off of the PSU that will definitely reach down to the 3.5" cage slot where your second drive will go.

pcglaw
Token Ring
Posts: 17
Registered: ‎01-14-2009
Location: US
Views: 1,858
Message 5 of 10

Re: How to change primary hard drive

thanks again, I'm glad my old computer (a pentium I built from scratch) is still chugging along, as it seems I'll need a little more time to shop and figure out how to get the new one running.  I was going to built this one as well but just don't have the time.  Thanks for the info.

pcglaw
Token Ring
Posts: 17
Registered: ‎01-14-2009
Location: US
Views: 1,825
Message 6 of 10

Re: How to change primary hard drive

Can you tell my why you divided the 1T into four partitions?  Thanks

SeniorGuru
Posts: 2,222
Registered: ‎06-13-2013
Location: US
Views: 1,815
Message 7 of 10

Re: How to change primary hard drive


@pcglaw wrote:

Can you tell my why you divided the 1T into four partitions?  Thanks


I've been partitioning hard drives on all of my machines forever, with specific drive letters used to hold specific types of "parent folders" (i.e. my own data) on each of these partitions.  My own two desktop machines (not this M93p which I built for my brother-in-law to replace his dying Dell WinWP machine) have three and four internal hard drives, respectively.  And all of the drives on my machines are similarly partitioned, although the breakdown on the 3-drive machine is different than on the 4-drive machine, but with the same number of total partitions and drive lettering/content scheme on on both.

 

I do this to make my own life easier, so that no matter which machine I'm sitting down at the drive letter arrangement and data content on those partitions is always the same, with partitions C-M on the hard drives, N for the CD/DVD, and network drives (i.e. partitions on the other machine) starting from P.  I did exactly the same thing on my W530 laptop, which actually only has one internal 500GB drive... again, so that I intuitively know where things are (i.e. on what drive letter certain types of data will be found).

 

Now obviously, my brother-in-law doesn't have such a need.  But I built the machine for him, and I also "support" him remotely using RealVNC.  So in a sense I built him an image of my "standard structure" personal machines, so that I would feel comfortable helping him going forward.  I also showed him how to use the multiple partitions and what types of specific data was (or will be) located on each drive letter.  Initially I just created "parent" folders for him on these other partitions, but we worked together to migrate his own personal data off of the old WinXP machine into new target locations on the M93p... somewhere on partitions C/D for SSD and E-H for HDD, depending on the expected storage capacity and response-time needs.

 

So to answer your question, this is strictly my own personal style.  I really do not use C for my own data, other than what application software would normally store there (either in \ProgramData or in \Users).  On my own machines all of my real documents, files, pictures, videos, music, recorded TV, etc., are somewhere on drives D-M. My backup jobs take this into account.

 

And now my brother-in-law has come to understand and appreciate what I did and why it's sensible.  Makes it much easier to recover if Windows itself ever does need to be reinstalled... which I actually don't expect, but even if there were some super-disaster where corruption required extreme measures to recover it would be through a restore of "system image" via Macrium Reflect that it would be almost certainly done.

 

And that's because as part of the new system for him, I've also installed an external USB 3.0 drive (Verbatim 2TB Store 'n' Save), along with (a) Macrium Reflect and (b) NovaBackup and a suitable automated backup scheme.  The "system image" of just C and "system reserved" (so that Windows could be instantly recovered if necessary) via Macrium is done once a week (late Sunday night).  Data (in C:\Users and also on partitions D-H for him) is fully backed up once a month (on the 1st of each month), and then incrementally backed up each night (backing up only what's been changed or created in the past 24 hours).

 

With multi-generational retention and automatic purge by the software, this scheme provides COMPLETE selective folder/file recovery for any folder/file that existed during the past 5 months (and which existed long enough to at least make it to one of the "data" backups).

 

So really, I set his M93P partitions up to resemble how I do things for my own personal machines, specifically for partitions C-H.  For partitions I and higher, the type of data I myself store on those partitions on my own machines simply is not present on his machine.  Hence there was no need for me to get obsessively carried away trying to duplicate my own environment on his machine, where that data and related partition letter is simply not needed.

pcglaw
Token Ring
Posts: 17
Registered: ‎01-14-2009
Location: US
Views: 1,810
Message 8 of 10

Re: How to change primary hard drive

Thanks, my tower is shipping today; I am going to try using your procedure to set up the 240 GB SSD drive for the programs and I got a 1T seagate Hybrid for my data; I am not planning on doing partitioning on the 1T since I just organize things in different folders.  Thanks again for your assistance.

pcglaw
Token Ring
Posts: 17
Registered: ‎01-14-2009
Location: US
Views: 1,741
Message 9 of 10

Re: How to change primary hard drive

Hello again, quick question.  First, since Lenovo sales sent me the recovery disks with my computer when I ordered it (since I told them I intended to replace the hard drive with the SSD), I installed my SSD with the Kingwin adapter you recommended, and then just loaded the software and drivers using the recovery disks, since I opted for a "clean install". 

 

Then I installed the 1T Seagate hybrid (ST1000DX001) in the second hard drive bay; used windows disk manager to partition it (just one) and format it.    

 

My question is this:  what do you think is the best way to transfer the user files to the hybrid drive leaving the SSD just for programs?    I've seen several options on the internet.  I'm thinking of doing it this way: 

 http://www.eightforums.com/tutorials/4275-user-profiles-relocate-another-partition-disk.html

 

or should I just change the location of the user files such as documents, music, etc. by going into properties?  Let me know what you think, thanks.

SeniorGuru
Posts: 2,222
Registered: ‎06-13-2013
Location: US
Views: 1,729
Message 10 of 10

Re: How to change primary hard drive

I don't have Win8 installed on any of my machines.  I use Win7 Pro exclusively, on my desktops and laptop.

 

I don't bother to relocate C:\Users.  Never have.

 

But forever, going back past WinXP through Win98 and even to Win95, I have never bothered to specifically relocate \Users (or the old \Documents and Settings).  I just let it remain exactly where it is, on C.  This doesn't mean that's where the vast majority of my data files are located, but I just leave \Users where it is.

 

Instead, I have my own MULTIPLE private data folders for pictures, music, videos, documents, customer data, financial data, recorded TV, etc., located elsewhere on my partitions D-M located on partitions of my other two or three internal hard drives (depending on the machine).  Over the years I've upgraded my environments through many motherboards, CPU's, had hard drives (IDE --> SCSI -> SATA3 -> SATA6) and have simply been partitioning them the same way with consistent partition drive letters C-M (or sometimes just C-J), so that I don't have to think about things uniquely by machine.

 

In other words, when I download something from a software vendor web site I don't just let the browser put it in the default "downloads" where it would otherwise go.  I set my browser to "always ask" me where I want to put it, and I store it in my "software installer folder" located as H:\BBS (named with its original name back from the old days when there were dial-up private BBS systems vendors used to provide software updates through), with sub-folders for each software vendor.  You just need to opt to do this, and figure out for yourself where you want all your assorted data categories to go, and what you want to call those host folders and sub-folders.

 

Then, you just navigate to these off-C folder/file locations when you want to open or play or read or work.  The software products that use these files will always remember the last-used locations, and you simply will just use them from off-C.  That way you don't have to fool around with making changes to Windows, etc.

 

But that's just me.

 

Does something still end up on C in C:\Users (mostly in \Appdata by software products)?  Sure.  Is it critical or problematic?  Absolutely not. So yes, most of my private data is off-C, and other data is on-C in \Users.  Not critical for me.

 

Most important: have a backup scheme, and do backups to other media. I have a 2TB external USB 3.0 drive that I use for both "system image" backups (via Macrium Reflect) scheduled weekly and also "data" backups ( via NovaBACKUP, for both \Users on C as well as all my private data folders on non-C) scheduled monthly for "full" backups and daily for "incremental" backups.  I also use NovaBackup to backup my C-drive except for the \Windows folder, since my Macrium Reflect "system images" will be used to restore the whole C-partition from in case of true disaster.

 

No matter where your data is located, YOU MUST BACK IT UP.

 

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