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JWBlue
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Posts: 199
Registered: ‎01-07-2009
Location: US
Views: 157
Message 1 of 7

M920 : Two graphics cards in system

If I purchase an M920 with two graphics cards will the fan or fans run louder?

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Machine Type: M90z AIO ; Product: 3091CTO (Custom), CPU: i5-650, Video Card: Intel(R) HD Graphics, Memory: 4.00 GB,
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Message 2 of 7

Re: M920 : Two graphics cards in system

How many monitors do you wish to connect? 

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JWBlue
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Posts: 199
Registered: ‎01-07-2009
Location: US
Views: 127
Message 3 of 7

Re: M920 : Two graphics cards in system


@BiggAl wrote:

How many monitors do you wish to connect? 


 

One.

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Machine Type: M90z AIO ; Product: 3091CTO (Custom), CPU: i5-650, Video Card: Intel(R) HD Graphics, Memory: 4.00 GB,
Network Card: Intel(R) WiFi Link 1000 BGN, OS: Windows 7 Professional 64-bit
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Message 4 of 7

Re: M920 : Two graphics cards in system

What's the need for one graphics card, let alone two?  Are you doing CAD, or video / photo editing? 

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JWBlue
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Posts: 199
Registered: ‎01-07-2009
Location: US
Views: 118
Message 5 of 7

Re: M920 : Two graphics cards in system


@BiggAl wrote:

What's the need for one graphics card, let alone two?  Are you doing CAD, or video / photo editing? 


 

I do not do any gaming or anything like that mentioned.  I read somewhere that an additional graphics card can help with watching high definition videos.

 

The only option for a discrete card NVIDIA Geforce GT730 2GB DDR5 which is not really a high end card.

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Machine Type: M90z AIO ; Product: 3091CTO (Custom), CPU: i5-650, Video Card: Intel(R) HD Graphics, Memory: 4.00 GB,
Network Card: Intel(R) WiFi Link 1000 BGN, OS: Windows 7 Professional 64-bit
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Message 6 of 7

Re: M920 : Two graphics cards in system


@JWBlue wrote:

I do not do any gaming or anything like that mentioned.  I read somewhere that an additional graphics card can help with watching high definition videos.

 

The only option for a discrete card NVIDIA Geforce GT730 2GB DDR5 which is not really a high end card.


You didn't say whether you were thinking of purchasing an M920 SFF or tower.  My personal recommendation is to go with the M920t (tower), which is really small anyway. Lenovo has really cut down the case sizes over the past two generations of Intel CPU's and the current M920t tower is almost as small as the old SFF cases.  So it really doesn't take hardly any room at all, certainly nothing like the older tower cases that were really nice and roomy inside compared to today's which are inches smaller in height and depth. With the newer cases you really have to be careful what you buy, depending on if you want to add something yourself.

 

That said, the other two advantages of going with the tower case are:

 

(a) the size of the power supply included, which is 250W for the tower, and only 210W for the SFF. If you want to use your own graphics card (not the GT730 from Lenovo) this is a significant improvement in the larger PSU.

 

(b) the "depth" dimension of the tower case is about 3 inches longer than that of the SFF case.  This dimension affects the maximum length of an expansion card you can use, and in particular x16 graphics cards are long. The SFF case would also require a low-profile card, so that's an additional constraint on top of the shorter max length possible, making SFF a really poor choice to buy if you want to have at least some degree of freedom to pick your own graphics card.

 

My suggestion is to go with an M920t tower, and also buy your own graphics card to add yourself. I built-out an M920t for my cousin and decided to go with a Gigabyte low-profile GTX 1050ti OC card, which is 4GB GDDR5 at a very good price, and is a single-fan design so it's relatively short and will absolutely fit the max length constraints of the M920t. It also comes with a full-size bracket as well so you can use it in a regular tower case like the M920t tower, or in an SFF case if you didn't have the length consideration as you do in the M920s SFF.  Also, these GTX 1050ti cards are nice because they are rated at 75W TDP, which means you don't need additional PCIe power from the PSU... which isn't even available in the M920t's 250W PSU. So you don't need to replace the PSU, and can still get the very good performance of the GTX 1050ti card.

 

I also have used a number of EVGA GTX 1050ti SC cards in other machines. This card is also single-fan design and is even shorter than the Gigabyte low-profile card.  But it's higher priced (for some reason) and not quite as fast as the Gigabyte OC card. It should also be usable in the M920t, but I went with the Gigabyte card and am completely happy with it.

 

So my suggestion is that you leave out the graphics upgrade from Lenovo, and purchase the M920t tower machine just as it is. When it arrives, before you even turn it on, just open it up and install the gigabyte GTX 1050ti card in the x16 slot. Then close it up and turn on the machine.  Windows will recognize the presence of the new hardware and will get the updated nVidia driver automatically.  Even if it doesn't you can always just get the regular retail nVidia driver from the nVidia site, and install it yourself.  If you opt for GeForce Experience as well (even if you're not a gamer) it will keep your driver up to date and notify you when a new version is available for install.

 

The presence of the additional graphics card will automatically disable the built-in Intel HD Graphics that is part of the CPU. So you will simply be using the discrete nVidia graphics card you added yourself.

 

That's my suggestion.

JWBlue
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Posts: 199
Registered: ‎01-07-2009
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Message 7 of 7

Re: M920 : Two graphics cards in system


@DSperber wrote:

@JWBlue wrote:

I do not do any gaming or anything like that mentioned.  I read somewhere that an additional graphics card can help with watching high definition videos.

 

The only option for a discrete card NVIDIA Geforce GT730 2GB DDR5 which is not really a high end card.


You didn't say whether you were thinking of purchasing an M920 SFF or tower.  My personal recommendation is to go with the M920t (tower), which is really small anyway. Lenovo has really cut down the case sizes over the past two generations of Intel CPU's and the current M920t tower is almost as small as the old SFF cases.  So it really doesn't take hardly any room at all, certainly nothing like the older tower cases that were really nice and roomy inside compared to today's which are inches smaller in height and depth. With the newer cases you really have to be careful what you buy, depending on if you want to add something yourself.

 

That said, the other two advantages of going with the tower case are:

 

(a) the size of the power supply included, which is 250W for the tower, and only 210W for the SFF. If you want to use your own graphics card (not the GT730 from Lenovo) this is a significant improvement in the larger PSU.

 

(b) the "depth" dimension of the tower case is about 3 inches longer than that of the SFF case.  This dimension affects the maximum length of an expansion card you can use, and in particular x16 graphics cards are long. The SFF case would also require a low-profile card, so that's an additional constraint on top of the shorter max length possible, making SFF a really poor choice to buy if you want to have at least some degree of freedom to pick your own graphics card.

 

My suggestion is to go with an M920t tower, and also buy your own graphics card to add yourself. I built-out an M920t for my cousin and decided to go with a Gigabyte low-profile GTX 1050ti OC card, which is 4GB GDDR5 at a very good price, and is a single-fan design so it's relatively short and will absolutely fit the max length constraints of the M920t. It also comes with a full-size bracket as well so you can use it in a regular tower case like the M920t tower, or in an SFF case if you didn't have the length consideration as you do in the M920s SFF.  Also, these GTX 1050ti cards are nice because they are rated at 75W TDP, which means you don't need additional PCIe power from the PSU... which isn't even available in the M920t's 250W PSU. So you don't need to replace the PSU, and can still get the very good performance of the GTX 1050ti card.

 

I also have used a number of EVGA GTX 1050ti SC cards in other machines. This card is also single-fan design and is even shorter than the Gigabyte low-profile card.  But it's higher priced (for some reason) and not quite as fast as the Gigabyte OC card. It should also be usable in the M920t, but I went with the Gigabyte card and am completely happy with it.

 

So my suggestion is that you leave out the graphics upgrade from Lenovo, and purchase the M920t tower machine just as it is. When it arrives, before you even turn it on, just open it up and install the gigabyte GTX 1050ti card in the x16 slot. Then close it up and turn on the machine.  Windows will recognize the presence of the new hardware and will get the updated nVidia driver automatically.  Even if it doesn't you can always just get the regular retail nVidia driver from the nVidia site, and install it yourself.  If you opt for GeForce Experience as well (even if you're not a gamer) it will keep your driver up to date and notify you when a new version is available for install.

 

The presence of the additional graphics card will automatically disable the built-in Intel HD Graphics that is part of the CPU. So you will simply be using the discrete nVidia graphics card you added yourself.

 

That's my suggestion.


M920 tower.

 

I will consider the single GPU.

 

I have read conflicting information whether a second GPU will improve performance of video streaming.  Would having a second card improve video quality on Netflix or other sies?

 

 

 

______________________________________________________________
Machine Type: M90z AIO ; Product: 3091CTO (Custom), CPU: i5-650, Video Card: Intel(R) HD Graphics, Memory: 4.00 GB,
Network Card: Intel(R) WiFi Link 1000 BGN, OS: Windows 7 Professional 64-bit

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