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SeniorGuru
Posts: 2,215
Registered: ‎06-13-2013
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Views: 103
Message 41 of 50

Re: Thinkcenter M910t-Add 3.5 inch HardDrivt to Secondary Drive Bay


@SGV2005 wrote:

And the other half (463.74Gb) previously partitioned is there too, under the (DSmiley Happy name.

 


I believe that WinPE is simply assigning drive letters sequentially to the partitions that it sees, moving up one drive at a time if there is more than one physical drive present, same as ordinary real Windows would do.  It does recognize the "boot" partition where Windows actually lives, and that starts "C".  From there it's just next partition -> next letter, etc., and then on to the next drive and repeat, etc.

 

I don't believe the letters you see assigned here match with what would have been the drive letters in real Windows (other than by coincidence) since you can manually change drive letters for partitions to be anything you want, and that information is saved in Windows itself... not on the drive.  So when you boot to WinPE there's no way the real Windows drive letters can be known.

 

So, since you only have the one drive and it's got two partitions that are lettered (the other partitions on the drive are marked in the GPT partition table as "no letter" for real Windows, so WinPE does the same thing and doesn't assign a letter), you end up with C and D.  But given your earlier screenshots I would bet that if we ever do get Windows to boot again from this HDD that second partition will still be B, since that's from your own manual assignment when you were attempting partitioning (I've already talked about that).

 

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Message 42 of 50

Re: Thinkcenter M910t-Add 3.5 inch HardDrivt to Secondary Drive Bay


@SGV2005 wrote:

I launched the PW standalone USB boot drive as agreed, and it opened MiniTool PE loader as shown on photo 1  (blue screen).

Then, it started opening Partition Wizard which allowed me to take the 2 following pictures of the on-screen partitions. Partition 1 (System, 260Mb) shows clearly that it's "active & system" as you were expecting. One good thing to know already. It's still there...

Then I came back to the first (blue screen) page to click on the "Reboot your PC" to see what's next.

The blue screen disappeared and the PC start to reboot.... to come back to the same blue screen page and restart opening the same PW page (photos 2 and 3). I am hesitant to click on any of the other lines (such as 'command console") because I am afraid I'm going to screw up something again.

What is the next move now that we have achieved that first step ?

First, when you boot to the USB drive and after WinPE's "loading files" completes and PW actually launches with the program logo screen filling the whole display, there are then two small intermediate windows which pop up both of which have an "OK" and "Cancel" button.  If you don't click on one or the other button then in 15 seconds it times out with "OK" assumed by default.  After the second window is finished, now the real program finally launches with its familiar GUI... just running standalone under WinPE.

 

The first of those two intermediate screens offers you the ability to accept 1024x768 resolution for the eventual program GUI (which happens if you push the "OK" button or let it time out), or a lesser resolution (from "Cancel").  Obviously you should push OK or just let it time out.

 

The second of those two intermediate screens offers you the auto-launch of the program without your having to do anything (this is the same as if you push "OK" or let it time out).  If you push "Cancel" then that primary blue screen is presented and it's now up to you to choose one of the six main functional options displayed on the menu.

 

If you auto-launch the GUI via "OK" or timeout, or you manually initiate the program by "Cancel" and then selecting "Launch Partition Wizard", you are now in the main program.  And you can now do as many things as you care to do in this session.  When you're finally done you click on the "X" in the upper-right corner, and you will be returned to the "blue screen" main menu.  If you are totally done, first remove the USB flash drive before you select "reboot your PC" else you'll just reboot from the USB drive all over again.  By removing the USB drive first you presumably want to re-boot from HDD (if that worked and you didn't get the 1962 error, which eventually it will... just not now).

 

From the photos you've posted it does look like the C partition probably only has Windows in it.  It's only got 41GB in use.  And it is marked "boot", so it sure looks like it is expected to truly be where Windows lives.

 

And you said you'd begun copying stuff to the second partition which really should have been D, not B (I assume from one of your backup drives when they were attached).  Did you mean to copy that stuff to D?  These are pure "data" which can live on any drive as opposed to being part of "My Documents" or "My Music" or "My Pictures" or something like that, which is expected to be on the C partitions under C:\Users\<userid>\...  Nevertheless it does appear the D partition has lots of data on it, 297GB in use.

 

Additionally while you were still in the GUI of PW, I wanted you to "explore" each of those two partitions.  Just right-click on a partition (down in the horizontal representation area is an easy place to right-click) and select "explore" from the popup.  That will produce a second smaller window with an Explorer tree in it, that you can then expand the folders shown, to reveal sub-folders and files.  Again the goal is to confirm that the C partition looks "good" like a real Windows partition should look, rather than having been wiped out or damaged.

SGV2005
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Message 43 of 50

Re: Thinkcenter M910t-Add 3.5 inch HardDrivt to Secondary Drive Bay

So I did as you suggested:

- Took photos of each Drive partition shown on the PW screen by using "Explore".

The C: drive contains Windows files as expected, but oddly enough there is also a "0-CINEMA" folder that should be in the B: drive. I must have transferred it there by mistake. However, I don't think it disturbs anything inside that drive.

Could you tell me if there is anything wrong, looking at these sub-folders and files ?

- After having done that, I took out the standalone USB flash drive, then push on the Reboot button (on the blue screen) to see if it was going to work. Well, NO, it did not work. The Error 1962 message popped up again.

Rather disappointing, I think.

What to do now ?

 

EXPLORE of PW Partitions 1.jpgEXPLORE of PW Partitions 2.jpgEXPLORE of PW Partitions 3.jpgEXPLORE of PW Partitions 4.jpg

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Message 44 of 50

Re: Thinkcenter M910t-Add 3.5 inch HardDrivt to Secondary Drive Bay

Well, it all looks good. At least the contents of these partitions look exactly as they should based on your description of what you did to get to this state.

 

We still have an open question you haven't answered yet, and that is what did you use or do to shrink the originally delivered 930GB C-partition into your current 465GB partitions C and D.  The originally delivered  HDD had no free space on it.  It was fully allocated, with a giant C.

 

That means you could not possibly have "created" a new partition on it using any tool or program, unless you first re-sized (i.e. shrunk) the 930GB partition down to 465GB, with the now freed-up 465GB now available to create the second 465GB partition (which you say you were forced to letter as B since D was already taken, even though that means it must have been on some other drive or much more likely assigned to your optical drive (which doesn't show up anywhere in Partition Wizard or Macrium Reflect, but DOES show up in DISKMGMT.MSC).  Anyway, you can change the drive letter of your optical drive using DISKMGMT.MSC, same as you can change the drive letter of any partition on an internal HDD or SSD or an external drive.

 

So this probably explains why you couldn't give a letter of D to that second 465GB partition you had somehow created, because it was in use for your optical drive and you hadn't noticed that.

 

 

Anyway, doing some Interweb research on how to fix the 1962 error, if you had your original Win10 installation media you could theoretically run "startup repair".  The recovery media you're expecting from Lenovo is not a genuine Win10 installation DVD or USB. I believe is more like something which allows you to rebuild your HDD to look exactly as it did when it left the Lenovo factory.  At least I think that's what it will provide.  So when you are finally "recovered" it's like you just opened the carton again and started with first-time boot.  I honestly can't provide any help here on this, as I've never used Lenovo's recovery media.  I don't even have it.

 

But here is an article on "how to fix PC error 1962 in Lenovo computers" that seems to provide an alternative approach to accomplishing "startup repair", by building your own USB Win10 install media.  I don't know what your current boot device sequence list in the Startup tab now looks like, but using F12 at boot time allows you to manually select a drive.  You only have one bootable drive in the machine right now, namely HDD.  So if you point to that HDD (either from the Startup tab boot list or via F12) you're still forcing the BIOS to look for that "active & system" EFI system partition where Boot Manager lives.  Something must have gotten screwed up within that partition.

 

I would suggest trying the steps set forth in that article.  Looks perfectly appropriate to me.  We're just trying to do a "startup repair" which is exactly what it sounds like, namely to investigate the situation and make appropriate changes to correct whatever got screwed up so that the "system" partition and Boot Manager once again go to the Windows C partition to boot.  We have to assume the C partition is truly still usable, even though you can't remember how you shrunk it.

SGV2005
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Message 45 of 50

Re: Thinkcenter M910t-Add 3.5 inch HardDrivt to Secondary Drive Bay

I will read the article you showed and try to follow the steps set forth in there to "startup repair".

Regarding the partitioning of the original HDD, like I previously told you, I am almost sure that I used the "Create and Format Hard Disks Partitions" tool in Windows 10 (just typed "Partitions" in Cortana).

That allowed me to create 2 partitions in C: but I did not do anything to shrink C: prior to the partitioning of the entire HDD. I cannot remember that I chose to divide that HDD in 2 equal partitions, or it was just split as such.

Anyway, you can see from the PW photo that only 8% of C: was used, so there is still plenty of space. Looking closely at it, you can see that on the left side of the blue line there is a darker portion (which corrresponds to the 8%).

I'll let you know what happens with the "startup repair" exercise that I'll do tomorrow.

Thanks and good night.

 

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Message 46 of 50

Re: Thinkcenter M910t-Add 3.5 inch HardDrivt to Secondary Drive Bay


@SGV2005 wrote:

I will read the article you showed and try to follow the steps set forth in there to "startup repair".

Regarding the partitioning of the original HDD, like I previously told you, I am almost sure that I used the "Create and Format Hard Disks Partitions" tool in Windows 10 (just typed "Partitions" in Cortana).

That allowed me to create 2 partitions in C: but I did not do anything to shrink C: prior to the partitioning of the entire HDD. I cannot remember that I chose to divide that HDD in 2 equal partitions, or it was just split as such.

Anyway, you can see from the PW photo that only 8% of C: was used, so there is still plenty of space. Looking closely at it, you can see that on the left side of the blue line there is a darker portion (which corrresponds to the 8%).

I'll let you know what happens with the "startup repair" exercise that I'll do tomorrow.

 

 


Good luck.  Let's hope "startup repair" succeeds in doing exactly what it was designed to accomplish, namely do whatever repair is necessary to get you bootable again (since in truth your now two partitions do look fine, as does the EFI "system" partition where Boot Manager lives).  It is intended to detect and recognize "breakage" for whatever reason, and to put back the linkages or values necessary to allow the machine to boot properly and successfully again.  So it should see you have a good EFI "system" partition, and a good Windows "boot" partition, and replace whatever is damaged and broken or pointing to the wrong place with corrected valid proper items.

 

This "startup repair"has been around for a long time, including in Win7.  I suspect the version now available through Win10 is even smarter and slicker.  So I am optimistic this could get you back in business on your current HDD setup with its two partitions, without requiring you to make use of the soon-to-arrive Lenovo recovery media.

 

Anyway, I was unaware of the "create and format hard disk partitions" tool you mention in Win10.  As should be evident by now from my ramblings, I rely strictly on Partition Wizard for ALL of my partitioning needs, and for Macrium Reflect to perform ALL of my regular as well as first-time "system image" backups/restores for total protection and disaster recovery.  My recommendation is that you consider the same approach.

 

This includes using Macrium Reflect installed almost immediately after first-time use for a new machine to perform that very first "system image" BACKUP of all the partitions on whatever HDD Lenovo has factory-provided, to an external USB backup drive.  This then becomes my own "usable" version of the Lenovo "recovery media".  Had you yourself done this prior to embarking on "create and format hard disks partitions" via Win10 itself, you could have in desperation and as a last resort after this week's trials and tribulations just finally decided to "go back to factory" and use Macrium Reflect restore ALL of those Lenovo-provided partitions on the HDD and simply "started over" with the whole clone-to-SSD project (this time a bit wiser).

 

As I described previously, your project's objective was conceptually to end up with two smaller partitions (i.e a resized C for Windows, and a second D for "data") on the SSD which you would then be booting from. And when that step was completed, you wanted to delete everything currently on the HDD and create one or two additional "data" partitions, say E and F.  You didn't need to to fool around changing things on the HDD before the cloning with Macrium Reflect.  You could have just adjusted things appropriately in the clone itself, as well as using DISKMGMT to change the drive letter of your optical drive to something other than D and much higher (say to "O" for "optical") in order to free up D which is a much more intuitive drive letter to use for your second partition on a storage drive.

 

Again, Windows assigns drive letters in sequence, going through each storage drive and each partition discovered both internal and external via SATA and eSATA including optical drives, then to externally connected drives via USB. And in the end, no matter what drive letter Windows finally assigns to everything, if you don't like it you can still then change it after-the-fact to whatever you decide you want (except for C which cannot be changed) using either DISKMGMT or PW.  ANY current drive letter can be changed to any other available drive letter, so for example if you wanted to "swap" two letters you'd have to go through a 3-step process and use an intermediate "placeholder" letter which would allow you to accomplish your drive letter "reversal".  Otherwise, if you don't like what you have you can just change it yourself manually in this way.

 

And furthermore, no matter what partition sizes and arrangement you have or end up with, you can always change that using Partition Wizard after-the-fact.  You can "shrink" (i.e. "resize") partitions, you can move them left or right (assuming there exists "unallocated free space" appropriately in order to facilitate the left/right "slide"), you can "delete", you can "create", you can assign "labels" to partitions which will then appear in Windows Explorer (next to the partition's drive letter) which might be useful to you when you're looking at an Explorer tree view, etc.

 

So, for example, your project could have started with a 100% "clone" (i.e. full all-partitions COPY using Macrium Reflect, from HDD to SSD since they are both 1TB and no partition re-sizing was really necessary.  Then you could have booted to the SSD and used Partition Wizard after-the-fact to now shrink C (i.e. move its right edge left in the graphical picture) so as to free up space "to its right", so that you could then "create" your second "data" partition on the SSD.  Having used DISKMGMT previously to change the letter on your optical drive from D to "O", D would now be the first available letter so when you used PW to "create" this new second "data" partition on the SSD it would automatically present D by default (which you could accept which would be the right thing to do here, or change to something else if you wanted to in some future possible situation).

 

When you finally pushed the APPLY button for PW, it would complete as much as it could (which might not be too much, since the story starts with shrinking C which cannot be done while still running under Windows), and then triggering a re-start where it will kick back in during the boot process to complete the remaining unfinished steps in your queued agenda.  Eventually it will finish and the normal boot process will be resumed and completed, and you'll once again be back in your newly re-sized Windows setup with two partitions on the SSD lettered C and D, optical drive lettered "O", and old original partition (i.e. large Windows C) still existing on HDD and likely lettered E. The other un-lettered partitions on original HDD and new SSD (from the 100% clone) would still be there and un-lettered.

 

And you can now probably take another "kind of first-time" Macrium Reflect "system image" backup of your newly invented SSD that you are now running from.  You might give a name to this MRIMG file of "Right after clone and partitioning", so that if you ever looked in the backup folder on your backup drive you would immediately understand what it was and when it was produced, in case you ever needed to restore things back to this moment in time.

 

And now you could proceed with the "burn it down and re-build it from scratch" re-purpose of your now fully available HDD since you're now up and running properly from the newly partitioned SSD, again using Partition Wizard. You would "delete" every partition (both lettered and un-lettered) currently seen on the HDD.  So now the entire 1TB is "unallocated" free space on this GPT-partitioned drive.  And you can then "create" one or more new NTFS "data" partitions assigning whatever drive letters you want right here during the "create" using PW.  When you're all done, push APPLY, and it will all happen and complete in just a minute or less probably since "create" is very quick.

 

So this story applies to how I would have approached things starting from the "factory Lenovo" condition of the HDD.  If you do have to use the soon-to-be-received Lenovo recovery media I suspect this is once again where you will be placed back to.  But if the "startup repair" procedure is successful you will instead be at a slightly different place, namely booting from your HDD but with two partitions on it already.  So you will simply adjust the outline of my above approach accordingly, since you've already got two partitions on HDD prior to the clone over to SSD.  If these partitions already contain what you wanted to end up with anyway, then the clone will get you back into the right place in my story.  If you want to do things somewhat differently now, you have that option as well.  Up to you.

 

 

Sorry for my long story, but I'm trying to convey editorially how Macrium Reflect and Partition Wizard can (and should) be used, to physically configure your target DIY objective setup from whatever hardware configuration you got from Lenovo.  There may be other tools available in Windows or other 3rd-party vendor products but I'm fluent in Macrium Reflect and Partition Wizard and have never been let down by them.

 

Hopefully what has been learned from what we've been through so far, and what you have learned through usage about these two vendor software products, will stand you in good stead going forward.

 

Let's hope "startup repair" is sufficient to rid you of the current 1962 and get you working again and back on the right track.

SGV2005
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Message 47 of 50

Re: Thinkcenter M910t-Add 3.5 inch HardDrivt to Secondary Drive Bay

I have gone twice through the several websites and documents that discussed and advise about what/how to do to correct the Error 1962, and I have come to the conclusion that there was only one option that seems to be the most realistic and practical for me to implement: create a Windows Media Creation tool on a USB drive and then do the "Startup Repair" from there.

 

However, I received from Lenovo yesterday the Recovery disc (a USB flash drive to be exact), and I decided to use it to re-install everything instead, as I haven't done much last time before the crash (apart downloading some apps and tranferring some of my exsiting folders and files from my external back-up drives). Not much to lose and rather saving time.

I started by re-connecting the SSD drive inside the Lenovo, took a photo of the partitions with PW. Everything was there: HDD, SSD, DVD-drive (and the SSD even showed the cloned system image that included "system & active" on top). 

So this morning I reinstalled Windows 10 Pro on the Lenovo with the Recovery drive. It was very straightforward and simple.

The nice thing is that this time I can give instructions right from the start for the Windows system to be installed directly on the SSD drive, and to format the HDD completely.

Everything is working well now, and I have started configuring the PC like I wish. Downloaded PW and Macrium also.

Regarding your recommendation to make immediately a copy of the System Image with PW , I believe that the Lenovo Factory Recovery USB key will do the trick for the moment, don't you think ? I will have at least that Recovery system ready in case something bad occurs in the future. Then later on, I will try to create a System Image every month or so for back up, to have a more updated system recovery each time. Still have to learn how to do that though.

Thanks again for all you assistance, advise, and support throughout this recent challenging period. I learned a lot too, thanks to you.

 

 

 

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Message 48 of 50

Re: Thinkcenter M910t-Add 3.5 inch HardDrivt to Secondary Drive Bay


@SGV2005 wrote:

However, I received from Lenovo yesterday the Recovery disc (a USB flash drive to be exact), and I decided to use it to re-install everything instead, as I haven't done much last time before the crash (apart downloading some apps and tranferring some of my exsiting folders and files from my external back-up drives). Not much to lose and rather saving time.

 

I started by re-connecting the SSD drive inside the Lenovo, took a photo of the partitions with PW. Everything was there: HDD, SSD, DVD-drive (and the SSD even showed the cloned system image that included "system & active" on top). 

 

So this morning I reinstalled Windows 10 Pro on the Lenovo with the Recovery drive. It was very straightforward and simple.

The nice thing is that this time I can give instructions right from the start for the Windows system to be installed directly on the SSD drive, and to format the HDD completely.

Everything is working well now, and I have started configuring the PC like I wish. Downloaded PW and Macrium also.

 

Well, all's well that end's well. Sounds like this approach is the best one to have taken, and just forget about trying to use "startup repair" to resolve the 1962 and then continue on from where you then found yourself.

 

I've never used the recovery media from Lenovo, so I didn't know it could actually (a) install Win10 to the SSD even though your machine arrived with an HDD, and then (b) re-format the "damaged" HDD completely same as PW could do for you. I am not familiar with what is on the USB from Lenovo... is it a full Win10 retail installer?  Or is it a special Macrium Reflect-like "system image" restore media plus additional command-line type of tools, to designate what the target device is that you'd like to create (which can be HDD or SSD) for the primary Windows drive (also containing "system reserved" and Boot Manager), along with PW-like functions to delete/create partitions on any drive?

 

Interesting.  Whatever it is, it looks like it was easy for you to use and completely successful in getting you back in business. Even better, it sounds like to just went ahead and restored the "image" to the SSD to begin with (which was your objective overall from the beginning), and provded that you could boot to the SSD.  From there you just proceeded as would then be appropriate, including having allocated that second D-partition on SSD, and one or more additional partitions (E, F, etc.) on HDD, assuming you first re-lettered your optical drive from whatever it got from Windows to be something else well out of the way (like "O" for optical).

 

Don't forget to use Macrium Reflect real soon, before the end of the day TODAY, to take at least this current "work still in progress, but all is running smoothly at end-of-Day1" backup to your GPT-partitioned external 5TB USB drive.  You have come a long way, and have accomplished quite a bit today. Don't take the chance of somehow losing it and having to start all the way over again as you did today, yet one more time.  Daily "in-progress" backups are appropriate as you build-out your new system for failsafe security that guarantees you won't have to redo everything you've already done over the past days (i.e. starting over from the Lenovo recovery media), should a disaster occur that justifies restoring and going back to some previous plateau point.  Let's make sure that plateau point is no older than last night, etc.

 

I'm still puzzled about your second external USB drive 5TB drive which mysteriously shows as MBR, which is impossible and absolutely incorrect.  It should be GPT since it's larger than 2GB.  I can't understand how it could be truly 100% usable if it seriously is MBR, which is technically possible but would only allow use of the first 2GB of the 5GB drive.

 

Please post a bit more here as you progress along, to provide closure and updates and status, and what you discover about this mysterious MBR 5TB drive.

 

NOTE: you don't want to do Macrium Reflect "system image" backups once a month. You want to do them much more frequently, perhaps no less than weekly.  I run mine nightly on some machines, and three times a week or weekly on others. I also use NovaBackup for monthly FULL and nightly "incremental" backups for folder/filie "data" backups.

 

The product also offers FULL backups which take longer to produce but are easier to restore from, e.g. once each month on the 1st of every month, as well as (a) "incremental" backups that are much faster to produce than FULL and contain everything that's changed since the last "incremental" or "full" backup was taken, e.g. taken every night it covers the last 24 hours, or (b) "differential" backups that are fast initially but are increasinlgy longer as the days go by which contain everything that's changed since the last "full" backup was taken, e.g. taken every night it covers all of the progressively longer and longer period going back from the new current night of the progressing month to the most recent FULL backup taken back on the 1st of the month.

 

SGV2005
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Message 49 of 50

Re: Thinkcenter M910t-Add 3.5 inch HardDrivt to Secondary Drive Bay

- The Lenovo Recovery disc is a full "factory" one (as if it was made for first time installation). It comes with a full Windows 10 Pro system, but once downloaded on the PC and you start installing it, it would start by recognizing all the drives on the machine, then ask you which hard drive you want to install it on, and simultaneously if you want to format the other hard drive left, all in one shot. So it makes life so much easier for me as I did not have to install it on the HDD and then clone it afterwards onto the SSD. Of course, I reconnected the SSD first before the installation and checked that all was well before doing it, as it was my intention to proceed that way (install it directly on the SSD if possible).

So it just created a new PC, with all the "system reserve" , boot manager, and so on... directly on the SSD, and a fully reformatted HDD at the end of the installation.

- So far, I have not partitioned any of the drives, just downloaded some usual applications (as I have in my ASUS), prepared the external hard drives for the next step (transferring files to the Lenovo). I will start partitioning the drives on the Lenovo before that transfer to make 2 drives on the SSD (C and D) and 2 on the HDD for data (E and F). I also used the DVD-R drive to transfer some apps, and it worked well.

- I will follow your advice to create a system image on a regular basis, especially during the first days, when I am working on installing and configuring everything. It's a very prudent and necessary step. So I should use Macrium for that purpose.

- 3 questions on that process: (1) should I use the "Image selected disks on this computer" ? or the "Create an Image of the partition(s) required to back up and restore Windows" on the left column of the Macrium page ? (2) what exactly (partitions or folders) should I include in that system image "cloning" ? (3) once you have created a folder for the (periodical) system image on your external Hard Drive, do you just replace it (erase the old one) each time with the new one just created ?

- I will keep you posted about anything I can find out on that "mysterious MBR 5TB drive" when I have some time to look into it.

Cheers.

 

 

 

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Message 50 of 50

Re: Thinkcenter M910t-Add 3.5 inch HardDrivt to Secondary Drive Bay


@SGV2005 wrote:

- 3 questions on that process: (1) should I use the "Image selected disks on this computer" ? or the "Create an Image of the partition(s) required to back up and restore Windows" on the left column of the Macrium page ? (2) what exactly (partitions or folders) should I include in that system image "cloning" ? (3) once you have created a folder for the (periodical) system image on your external Hard Drive, do you just replace it (erase the old one) each time with the new one just created ?


I still don't have a clear picture of what the Lenovo Recovery Media but I'm guessing from your description of how you used it that it is NOT an actual Windows 10 from-scratch installation media like you'd buy from MS or in a store.  This would install only the MS-provided Windows components and you would probably have to enter values along the way as guided by the installation wizard.  You'd end up with a fully working Windows system, but none of the other Lenovo-provided 3rd-party proprietary software or Lenovo utilities which would normally get per-installed at the factory.

 

I suspect it is more of kind of Macrium Reflect-like utility, that comes along with a "ZIP'ed" (compressed) version of the factory-provided Windows drive (normally delivered on either HDD spinner or SSD) including not only MS Win10 but the additional software products and Lenovo utilities which you'd also find pre-installed when running any Lenovo machine fresh out of the carton.  So when it asks you which drive you want to install on and whether you'd also like to "format the other hard drive" (and by your choice of that "format" phrase I assume you mean "completely erase anything which might be present on your HDD, and build an empty GPT-partitioned fully unallocated 1TB drive avilable for creating future partitions on"), again this looks like another capability of the utility itself.

 

When you answer its questions and check what you do or do not want it to do, my guess is that it "un-zipped" the "system image" of the regular Lenovo factory-delivered Windows drive (and all four of its partitions: system_reserved, GPT, Win10, and Lenovo recovery). And then it also wiped out everything currently on your HDD, partitioning it using GPT but with no partitions yet created.

 

So if you posted a picture from PW right now (with you running from the Win10 system on the 1TB SSD) my guess is that you'd see:

 

(a) 260MB system_reserved EFI system partition (active&system),

(b) 16MB GPT (reserved partition),

(c) 930GB C Windows (boot), and

(d) 995MB WinRE (recovery partition)

 

And probably your 1TB HDD spinner just shows up as 930GB of GPT space with no allocated partition on it. I'll guess your optical drive is lettered D at the moment, if you haven't changed it.  I still would use either PW or DISKMGMT to change it from D to something else, say "O".  That would free up D to be used for the second partition on SSD.

 

Personally, I would have then performed my desired partitioning first (on both SSD and HDD), before copying anything over from your external backup drive(s). That way you could decide where you want to put things right away, either on C, D, E or F.  Again, you should use PW to accomplish your partitioning:

 

(a) "resize" (i.e. shrink) C from 930GB down to whatever you want, say 465GB as shown in your previous screenshots, by pulling the right edge of the C partition to the left in the "resize" GUI, until there is 465GB shown as the reduced size of C.  This frees up 465GB (to the right of the reduced C) which you now have available for the new D

 

(b) "create" D as a new NTFS partition in the newly available free space on SSD, giving it a "label" of say "SSD-P2" or whatever you want which will then appear in Windows Explorer so you better know what you're looking at.

 

(c) "create" E as a new NTFS partition of say 465GB on the left side of HDD, giving it a "label" of say "HDD-P1"

 

(d) "create" F as a second new NTFS partition of the remaining free space on HDD, giving it a "label" of say "HDD-P2"

 

(e) push APPLY.

 

PW will tell you it wants to re-boot, as it must do that to perform the first operation of re-sizing C when Windows is not operating.  And it can't perform the remaining three operations unitl it completes the first operation. So it will re-boot, and will automatically kick in at boot time before Windows gets started, to complete all of your queued operations.  When it finishes it will automatically resume the boot process, thus bringing you to the Windows desktop for normal login and startup. But you will now have all four of your partitions C, D, E and F, sized and located exactly as you specified.

 

And now you can plug in your external USB drives (which will get lettered G and H, since your optical drive has previously been changed to O so it's not in the way of the next available G for Windows to assign when you plug in your external drives).  You can now begin migrating data off of the external drive(s) G and H, into whichever of the four internal partitions you now have, C, D, E or F.

 

 

You have no need to "clone" one or more partitions from one physical drive to another any longer. That need has been obviated by simply reinstalling Windows directly to the SSD as you've now done.  So forget all about that function in Macrium Reflect.

 

You are now simply producing a "backup" (i.e. using the BACKUP tab in the program, as opposed to the RESTORE tab.  If you choose the "Create an Image of the partition(s) required to back up and restore Windows" that means what you need to preserve the bootable integrity of Windows itself. That means system_reserved, GPT, and C-Windows.  These are the crucial partitions which all should be backed up (and optionally restored) in unison, all three at the same time.  You back all three up, and if needed you restore all three... and your Windows system integrity and usability and bootability will be preserved.

 

The remaining two partitions on your SSD (i.e. D and WinRE) aren't crucial to Windows integrity. They are simply your own data (which should also be backed up somehow, let's be clear, but just not necessarily as part of the "Windows Integrity" system image) and the extra partition where "standalone Windows recovery" (previously known as standalone WinPE) lives.  Again, WinRE is something that has value but it is not crucial to Windows integrity.  You could actually live without ever needing the WinRE partition's contents, unlike those three cirtical Windows-related partitions.

 

Nevertheless, it's up to you if you'd like to back up the entire SSD in one job, or perhaps break it into two jobs (one for the Windows-critical three partitions and a second for D and WinRE).  When you go to "restore" you can always select any one or more of the partitions contained within the "system image" backup file (i.e. MRIMG file). You don't have to restore them all if you don't need to or want to, you can restore any one or more.  If you don't need to restore D you don't have to.  But as I said, if you should ever need to restore the Windows-critical partitions you MUST choose to restore all three of them in order to guarantee Windows integrity.

 

So you can simply back up everything on SSD in one job, or two jobs.  Up to you, and no difference in time or total MRIMG size (in the one or two MRIMG files) if you're always going to be backing up the entire SSD anyway using Macrium Reflect.  Similarly, you will want to take backups of the E and F partitions on HDD.  As I've stated previously, I just prefer to use NovaBACKUP to backup my "data" partitions, since its folder/file user interface for backup/restore is much more intuitive (I feel) than the similar folder/file functionality in non-free Macrium Reflect.  And I prefer folder/file backup for "data" rather than "system image" backup of the entire partition, because selective recovery of individual folders/files should that be necessary is much easier.

 

When you create a Macrium Reflect "backup definition file" you are really creating the XML definition of your "backup job", identifying what one or more partitions you want to include in the MRIMG output file, and the target folder (on your external backup drive) that you want the MRIMG files placed in. The wizard that guides you through creation of this job definition will also offer you a "retention profile" (whose values you can change), defining how many generations of the MRIMG output files from this job you want to retain as you run the job over and over periodically.

 

Macrium Reflect will then automatically delete the oldest generation (of the maximum number you said to retain) when you finally run the job again and it would produce one more than the maximum you said you wanted to keep.  So you need to do nothing yourself in order to keep the set of MRIMG files from this job "properly pruned", other than specify the desired number of generations you want to keep in the backup definition itself.

 

And after creating the backup definition file for the "job", you then "schedule" it to automatically run periodically, say at 2AM every Sunday, Wednesday and Friday.  Or nightly.  Or weekly. Or whatever you want.  And you can always manually RUN any of your backup definition jobs any time you want, i.e. if you have a special reason to run it outside of the normally automatically run scheduled job tun time which will still always run as scheduled.  If you miss running a scheduled backup (say the PC is down or dead), when you next bring the machine back up Macrium Reflect will detect that the scheduled job was not run for some reason and will "catch up" and run it right now.

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