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SGV2005
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Registered: ‎02-23-2019
Location: CA
Views: 120
Message 21 of 50

Re: Thinkcenter M910t-Add 3.5 inch HardDrivt to Secondary Drive Bay

I have already done yesterday most of what you suggested, i.e. unplug the PC and plug it back (no results).

I also removed the SSD (both power and data cables) so it does not appear any more in the BIOS.

That latter removal of the SSD allowed me to get back into the Start Up in the BIOS, and I was able to check that all the necessary drives are included in the primary boot sequence: USB KEY, USB HDD, USB FDD, SATA 2 for the original HDD spinner (obviously, the SATA 1 for the SSD is no more appearing on the list), then I saved the setting with F10.

The PC restarted automatically and tried to reboot, BUT the Error message 1962. No OS found appeared again.

It looks like the Windows Boot Manager function is gone. Whatever the configuration, it would not find any OS from where to boot.

 

So I will try that new thing you suggest: create a standalone USB boot drive with Macrium Reflect, and download a WinPE Kernel 10 to see if it could help rebooting or not the new Lenovo. I will let you know once I get there (if I can find from where I could download the WinPE 10).

By the way, I already contacted Lenovo Technical Support, and they are going to send me a Recovery Disc (that will arrive in a week time, as it will come from Germany... and I live in Canada).

 

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Message 22 of 50

Re: Thinkcenter M910t-Add 3.5 inch HardDrivt to Secondary Drive Bay

Just another thought, now that you can at least get back into the BIOS so as to set the boot device sequence with the USB items at the top...

 

Same as Macrium Reflect has its own ability to create "rescue media" (i.e. standalone WinPE bootable USB media), the same is true for Partition Wizard.  It is possible that somehow the partition table on your HDD spinner has gotten damaged.  So if you can build the standalone USB bootable media for Partition Wizard and boot to it (with your HDD spinner connected as it is right now, either with or without the SSD reinstalled), we can at least see what Partition Wizard sees and comprehends about your drives (either one or both).  You can take photos and post them as you did before.  I don't recall if you're running Win7 or Win10, but if it's Win10 then the HDD spinner most likely would have been delivered from Lenovo partitioned as GPT.  Win7 might have arrived with MBR, but most likely GPT as well.  If you can get standalone Partition Wizard to run we would be able to see it all.

 

Ideally you should install and run PW on your other machine which hopefully is a Win10 system. I say that because at the moment there is a bit of an issue producing the PW standalone bootable media on Win7 systems, which can be overcome with manual workarounds.  Not hard, but annoying.  And you must do it in order to then be able to boot on an M910t which is at least a Skylake chipset machine if not even newer 7th-generation.  But if you can build the PW standalone boot media on a Win10 machine, you can then also use it to boot on your M910t system without concern.  So let me know what your situation is.

 

As far as Macrium Reflect is concerned, when you go into Other Tasks -> create rescue media, you will get a new window to perform the dialog via wizard.  At the bottom of the window is an "Advanced" button and if you push it you get another window with "Advanced options" available in groups through tabs.  The first tab is "choose base WIM", which is where you select which WADK (i.e. WinPE version is to be downloaded).  As I said previously, I would just go with the WinPE 10 option, which is based on Win10 and therefore includes all the required components needed to boot from and use your M910t, including USB 3.0 for mouse and keyboard as is required for all machine chipsets Skylake and newer.  The WinPE 10 download is about 900MB, but it's all handled automatically by the "wizard" once you select it.

 

Unfortunately, Partition Wizard is not so slick, and doesn't offer you a choice of WinPE versions to build from.  Hence my discussion above.

 

 

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Message 23 of 50

Re: Thinkcenter M910t-Add 3.5 inch HardDrivt to Secondary Drive Bay


@SGV2005 wrote:

I also removed the SSD (both power and data cables) so it does not appear any more in the BIOS.

That latter removal of the SSD allowed me to get back into the Start Up in the BIOS, and I was able to check that all the necessary drives are included in the primary boot sequence: USB KEY, USB HDD, USB FDD, SATA 2 for the original HDD spinner (obviously, the SATA 1 for the SSD is no more appearing on the list), then I saved the setting with F10.

The PC restarted automatically and tried to reboot, BUT the Error message 1962. No OS found appeared again.

It looks like the Windows Boot Manager function is gone. Whatever the configuration, it would not find any OS from where to boot.

 

Can you please post a photo of the Startup tab option screen in the BIOS.  That plus a photo from Partition Wizard standalone to show the partitions on the disk(s) and their status would allow us to know if we can use "boot repair" tools or not.  For example PW can be used to "rebuild MBR record" (which is critical and required if the disk is partitioned MBR, in order to point to the "system reserved" partition which must be marked "active").  Or, if you had some Win7 or Win10 install media (i.e. optical DVD, or bootable USB) you can boot fropm it and go through its "startup repair" dialog.  Etc. But we need to see what things actually look like on the disk(s) before going forward with any attempt at boot recovery right now.  And you are awaiting recovery media from Lenovo next week, in worst case.

 

If you are running Win7 then you need CSM -> ENABLED, otherwise not.

 

If you are running Win7 you can have Boot Mode -> BOTH (i.e. UEFI and Legacy), and then you'd want "Legacy First". This also allows you to boot from an MBR disk.

 

You can also run Win7 and Win10 with Boot Mode -> UEFI only but then the boot disk must be partitioned GPT.  In this case the "system reserved" partition is identified as "EFI system partition" with a status of "Active & system", which would show up that way looking at it with PW.

 

Here is my own M910t "Startup" tab options. Again, I run Win7 from a Samsung 970 EVO M.2 NVMe SSD partitioned with GPT, as shown in my earlier screenshots.

 

M910t_BIOS_Startup-options.jpg

SGV2005
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Message 24 of 50

Re: Thinkcenter M910t-Add 3.5 inch HardDrivt to Secondary Drive Bay

FYI, my new Lenovo M910T runs with Intel i7 and Windows 10 Pro, and I remember everything was partitioned with GPT.

My other ASUS desktop also runs with Windows 10 Home.

So I hope it would make it clearer and easier now for you to give me directions.

I am attaching a screenshot taken yesterday morning with Partition Wizard (before the PC stopped responding) from the new Lenovo M910T, and you can see that it's all GPT partitioned on Disc 1 and Disc 2 (Disc 3 and 4 are 2 external 5TB Seagate Hard drives).

I have created a standalone USB portable flash drive with the WinPE 10 kernel, as you suggested. So I will not create another one with Partition Wizard for the moment, and will try to boot the Lenovo 910T with that standalone USB flash drive. Will let you know the outcome.

Thanks for being there for me through my new ordeal.

thumbnail.jpgthumbnail2.jpgthumbnail3.jpg

 

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Message 25 of 50

Re: Thinkcenter M910t-Add 3.5 inch HardDrivt to Secondary Drive Bay

Couple of things to say about your latest screenshots...

 

(1) Your PW window doesn't have everything shown because the columns in the upper part aren't spread to allow all text in all columns to be seen.  What's important is the rightmost two columns, but they're not shown for either your HDD or SSD. I think you've now removed the SSD so you only have the HDD still installed, and you can't boot to Windows so you can't re-run normal PW from within Windows.

 

But if you could produce that standalone USB boot media for PW from your ASUS machine, since it too is a Win10 machine the bootable USB output would therefore be WinPE 10, which will be usable on your M910t.  I'd sure like to see a PW window from the M910t showing the information in the right two columns.  Still surprising that even with the original HDD installed and no SSD that you get 1962.

 

For example, here is a PW screenshot (from normal PW running under Windows) from a new M920t machine I recently built for my cousin.  It runs Win10 Pro, and was purchased with a 1TB HDD like yours.  I installed a 256GB Samsung 970 EVO M.2 NVMe SSD and used Macrium Reflect to clone the Windows-related boot partitions over from HDD to SSD.  Obviously there was re-sizing of the target Windows C-partition needed.  I also did NOT clone the "Lenovo recovery partition" over from HDD to SSD because I never go back to "Lenovo factory state" so I don't need this partition.  Instead I use Macrium Reflect to take an "initial factory all partitions system image backup" as soon as I can do the initial boot to Windows from HDD and get Macrium Reflect installed.  This is what I could use in worst case if I had to return to "factory state", but my expectation is never to use it.  Instead, real world disaster recovery a year from now would be to restore my most recent regularly scheduled "system image" backup of my real world "production" system. I have no interest in going back to "factory" after years of normal operation and all that got installed and customized and happens over time.

 

Anyway, after the cloning from HDD to SSD in my cousin's M920t, I got into the BIOS to change the boot sequence list (as we've talked about), and then booted to the NVMe SSD and confirmed I was running perfectly.  Then I used PW to delete ALL PARTITONS on the HDD and then create some "data" partitions on it, thereby re-purposing the HDD for "data", while running Win10 Pro from NVMe SSD.  Same as your goal on your new M910t, except you're using a 1TB 2.5" SATA3 SSD instead of a 256GB M.2 NVMe SSD as I am with the M920t.

 

M920t_PW-drives.jpg

 

Note the right two columns in the upper details part of the window, showing "active & system" (status column) for the 260MB "EFI system partition" (type column).

 

(2) Your second "data" partition on the HDD shows a drive letter of "B". That is unexpected and unusual. Did you use DISKMGMT.MSC to manually change its drive letter to that?  I see additional partitions on the other drives with assigned drive letters of E, F, G and H.  Where did "D" go?  That is what I would have expected that second partition on your Disk1 to be... D, not B.  So how did B get assigned?

 

(3) You show two external 5TB drives.  The first one shows partitioning with GPT, but the second one shows partitioning with MBR which is wrong.  Any drive larger than 2TB can only be properly partitioned with GPT in order to make full use of it, with partitions supported of any size including possibly larger than 2TB.  With MBR the max usable drive size is 2TB, and the max partition size is also 2TB.

 

I don't understand how the second 5TB drive could be MBR with its one data partition shown as 4657GB of which 89% is used.  Seems impossible.  Note that if you are in PW you can right-click on a partition and select "explore" from the popup menu.  This will produce a second window with an Explorer tree in it, so that you can navigate through the folders/files to see what's on the drive.  So you can see if it really contains what you expect.  But if the drive really is MBR you should have a partition available that can be no larger than 2TB (yes, the remaining 3GB of your 5TB drive is genuinely unusable and unavailable because of the mistaken MBR partitioning). Any drive larger than 2TB MUST ABSOLUTELY be partitioned using GPT.

 

Note that if a drive is MBR, Partition Wizard can convert it to GPT without losing data... and vice versa.  But that's theoretiical I wouldn't attempt this yet, without knowing more about what's actually on that drive.  If you remove it from your M910t and plug it into your ASUS machine, and install PW and Macrium Reflect on the ASUS machine, we can investigate fully what is really on this second drive.

 

(4) The INCLUDE section in the upper part of the boot device sequence list is wrong.  You want the three USB items plus the optical drive up at the top of the group, not at the bottom.  Examination of this list by the BIOS is done in the order in which this list is built, to find the first usable bootable device.  So if you want to be able to boot to a USB drive or optical CD/DVD then that device must be listed ahead of either HDD or SSD (which could be bootable), in order to find it and boot to it before using another bootable device (i.e. HDD or SSD).  You need to drop the SATA1 device (HDD) to the bottom of that group (positiion the cursor on it and press "-" repeatedly to move it down to the bottom) and all should be good.

SGV2005
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Message 26 of 50

Re: Thinkcenter M910t-Add 3.5 inch HardDrivt to Secondary Drive Bay

- Obviously, the fact that I cannot reboot now prevents me from being able to produce a new screenshot that shows a full PW page.

I will try to do so if I can reboot with the standalone USB boot media, but haven't got the time to do so as I have a rather busy chedule today with several important meetings.

- My main problem has always been that after the unsuccessful attempt to boot from the SSD (after cloning), I have been using the original HDD again for normal configuration, but then when I got back into the BIOS' StartUp to try to change the booting order again 2 days ago, something happened that cause the 2 drives (HDD and SSD) to become totally corrupted. The attempt to switch from one drive to the other several times may have caused the crash. I strongly suspect that Windows Boot Manager on both drives have been damaged, which explains the 1962 message coming for both drives.

- When I tried to partition the original HDD, the letter (BSmiley Happy was suggested by the computer, which was quite unusual. I did not choose it. I was looking for a (DSmiley Happy letter but it was not offered. It was either B or F, G, K.... So I chose B.

- I have no idea why the second 5TB external drive is partitioned under MBR. It's an old drive I bought like 4 or 5 years ago. I just used it for back ups of all the files that I have. The NEW 5TB was purchased 1 year ago, smaller in size, but works well. Same purpose, because I expect the old one to die one day, and I don't want to lose all the files in it (so for now I have 2 full external back up drives).

- Regarding the order of the "Include" in the BIOS booting process, I tried several times to change it (include then exclude then include again all the 5 "included" drives), but the order is set that way automatically. The SATA 1 always came on top whatever I tried to do.

I'll try to see if I can re-arrange that order again and put the USB's on top.

- This afternoon, I will try to use the standalone USB boot flash drive to see if it works... Will keep you posted.

 

Going forward, when this problem will be "over", I will be interested to learn from you what and how exactly you deal with "system image" back ups.

 

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Message 27 of 50

Re: Thinkcenter M910t-Add 3.5 inch HardDrivt to Secondary Drive Bay


@SGV2005 wrote:

- Regarding the order of the "Include" in the BIOS booting process, I tried several times to change it (include then exclude then include again all the 5 "included" drives), but the order is set that way automatically. The SATA 1 always came on top whatever I tried to do.

I'll try to see if I can re-arrange that order again and put the USB's on top.


You don't rearrange things by including or excluding.  Include or exclude puts them in the top group or the bottom group.

 

You rearrange things in the INCLUDE group by using the "+" and "-" keys.  Use the mouse and/or arrow keys to move the highlight up or down to a given row.  Then with that row highlighted you use the "+" or "-" key to move that row up or down.

 

So in the current state with only the HDD installed your objective is to move its entry down to the bottom of the INCLUDE group, thereby moving all the USB and optical drive entries to be above it.  Therefore highlight that SATA1 row for the Seagate HDD, and with that row lit up press the "-" key repeatedly.  Each "-" stroke will move the highlighted to a new position one row down.

 


@SGV2005

- When I tried to partition the original HDD, the letter (BSmiley Happy was suggested by the computer, which was quite unusual. I did not choose it. I was looking for a (DSmiley Happy letter but it was not offered. It was either B or F, G, K.... So I chose B.



You don't partition the original HDD while it is in its current state.  And obviously this shouldn't have been attempted until you had successfully completed the cloning from HDD to SSD, and booted to SSD and confirmed you were actually running from the SSD (whose Windows partition would now be C).  Only then would you be in a position to re-purpose the HDD by the multistep PW procedure of:

 

(a) DELETE each of the multiple existing partitions from the HDD so that the entire 1TB of space now appears as one contiguous unallocated free space, and then

 

(b) CREATE one or more "data" NTFS partitions out of the 1TB unallocated space.

 

You don't actually CREATE a new partition on the HDD while the old original existing partitions still exist.  You re-purpose the entire drive by first deleting every old partition, and then creating one or more new partitions.  So if you actually did attempt to create a partition oin the HDD but you hadn't yet deleted all of the existing partitions on the HDD, and you were only offered B as a possible new drive letter for your new partition, that means D must already have existed somewhere else... although I don't see it in your screenshot.  Somehow you now ended up with B (i.e. some new partition lettered B), but there is no longer a D??

 

--> I don't know what steps you did, but you clearly did it wrong.  You now have B where I would have expected to see D, and you have no D.  I suspect we're going to soon be clearing out and re-cloning to from HDD yet one more time when we get this current mess straightened out. At the moment I don't see an D, so you should be able to use PW or DISKMGMT to "change drive letter" from B to D on your HDD.

 

I don't know what you were using to attempt this "partitioning" but I would have expected you to use Partition Wizard, because of its ease of use.  Nevertheless, as I described above you don't re-purpose the HDD until you're ready to, and you're not ready to.  And you don't re-purpose piecemeal... you re-purpose by first deleting all partitions until the entire 1TB is unallocated freespace, and then you create one or more new "data" partitions from this initial 1TB of totally unallocated freespace. It's easy to do this using PW, but only when you're booted successfully from the SSD... which obviously is not at the moment.

 

Anyway, for now that second partition on the HDD is B and not D. I hope you just somehow changed its letter, and didn't actually delete the old partition that used to be there and create a new partition now lettered D, but with nothing in it since it is new.  If you didn't use PW to do all of this, then what did you use?

 

 

One final thing... the 1TB HDD as delivered from Lenovo would have had most of the drive allocated as Windows C.  You would also have had a 9GB "Lenovo recovery" partition at the end, and the small "system reserved" and GPT partitions at the front. In between you would have had a Windows C partition of perhaps 930 GB or so.  Lenovo doesn't deliver their HDD partitioned with a second "data" partition on it, as you now show.

 

So how did you "shrink" that C partition on the HDD, and create the second "data" partition (which is now lettered B)?  What program did you use, and what steps?  If you'd wanted to do that I would have recommended using PW.  First you "resize" C, by moving its right edge left thereby "shrinking" it.  All of the new unallocated free space to its new right edge location would then be available for you to next "create" a new partition there using PW.  And D should have been the letter that would be offered to you, assuming you didn't yet have the SSD installed and didn't have any of your external drives plugged in, so that there wouldn't have been any other partitions with drive letters yet to get in your way.

 

Of course even after drive letters have been assigned by Windows, you can still change them.  You would either use PW or DISKMGMT.MSC to "change drive letter".  Obviously you can't immediately change to a drive letter that is currently in use, but you can use a multi-step "swap" approach involving multiple partitions, changing each of their drive letters (perhaps temporarily to some unused letter, just to free up its currently assigned letter for your use) in such a way as to accomplish the global re-lettering objective.

 

Anyway, let's get your booting issue squared away, whatever it takes.  For the moment I'd disconnect both external drives as well as the SSD, reverting you back to how the machine arrived with just the HDD installed.

 

And I'd get the BIOS boot sequence corrected to have the USB and optical drives first, and SATA1 HDD last, in the INCLUDE group, with everything else in the EXCLUDE group.

 

I'd make the two standalone bootable USB flash drive media, for PW and for Macrium Reflect, on the ASUS machine, so that they can be used on the M910t.  They should be bootable on both machines, as long as the USB entries in BIOS are in front of HDD in the boot sequence.

 

And don't re-purpose your Lenovo HDD until you've proven that you are booting from the cloned SSD (when you finally get there), and have also taken a Macrium Reflect "system image" backup of the factory HDD to your external backup drive.  Once you have that backup taken you can now proceed to delete all the partitions on the HDD and "create" one or more new ones.

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Message 28 of 50

Re: Thinkcenter M910t-Add 3.5 inch HardDrivt to Secondary Drive Bay

Having thought about it for a minute, I'm wondering if your current 1962 coming from the HDD-only situation is due to the fact that you have actually started re-purposing your HDD before you were ready to.  The fact that you currently have two smaller partitions (lettered C and B) on the HDD and you can't boot, where originally Lenovo delivered a single 930GB C with Windows in it, I am now suspicious that as a result of whatever you did you now no longer have a bootable Windows C-partition.

 

In other words, if you actually had done the cloning properly it should have been done while still in the working Windows state from HDD, with the 930GB Windows C.  You can make the target C (on the destination drive out of the Macrium Reflect cloning) any size you want, so you could have shrunk it during the clone.  Or, you could have just cloned the entire 1TB HDD to the new 1TB SSD, and resized things after the fact on the SSD using PW.

 

But the fact that you currently have two partitions on both HDD and SSD tells me you somehow resized HDD C and allocated a second partition on HDD (which somehow got lettered B) before you did the cloning to SSD.  The current 2-partition SSD looks almost identical to the current 2-partition HDD, so that's when the clone must have been done... after you had two partitions on the HDD.

 

But now neither HDD nor SSD is bootable, which seems impossible... unless the Windows (i.e. C) partition on both no longer really contains the Lenovo-delivered bootable Windows 10 because of what you did when re-sizing/creating to get to the current two partitions on HDD (and duplicated onto SSD).

 

So, how did you get from the large 930GB Lenovo C into the two smaller 465GB partitions on the HDD?  And was it only then that you did the clone from HDD to SSD?  And you used Macrium Reflect?  Were you running from Windows running off of the HDD, or from standalone WinPE Macrium Reflect from USB (probably not)?  Were you running while still in the single 930GB C on HDD, or from the smaller 465GB C on HDD?

 

If you can create standalone USB bootable PW media on the ASUS machine, and boot to it on M910t, and then right-click on the so-called C partition on HDD and select "explore" from the popup menu, we can see if this so-called Windows C partition on HDD at the moment really does still contain Windows, or not?

 

We need to explain the 1962, and an empty Windows C-partition would explain it.

SGV2005
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Message 29 of 50

Re: Thinkcenter M910t-Add 3.5 inch HardDrivt to Secondary Drive Bay

I just got back from my meeetings and saw your 2 messages, so I am writing back to you right away.

I haven't had the chance to reboot the Lenovo M910T yet with the standalone USB boot drive that I created with Macrium Reflect (btw, you seemed to prefer that this standalone USB boot drive be made using PW instead of Macrium; any specific reason for that preference ?).

You have discussed many theories or suggestions about how and why the (BSmiley Happy drive was created and that could have caused the original HDD drive to mess up (following a potential re-purposing).

Let me describe to you what happened since the beginning:

1/ I partitioned the original (CSmiley Happy drive in 2 parts before cloning anything to the SSD. I am not sure now if I did it with Windows 10 function "create and format hard disk partitions" or I used PW (I downloaded both Macrium and PW the same day I received the new PC). I did the same thing with my old ASUS and it has always worked well; except that this time with the Lenovo, I was offered to name the new partition on HDD as a (BSmiley Happy drive, or an E, F and G, but there was NO (DSmiley Happy available. I was very surprised to see that (DSmiley Happy was missing and subsequently chose (BSmiley Happy.

2/ After I partitioned the HDD, I installed the SSD inside the Lenovo and started the cloning from HDD to SSD. That probably explains why the 2 hard drives show similar partitions' sizes. 

3/ I did not re-purpose the HDD at all at any moment, even until the PC crashed. I wanted to be sure that the cloning went well and the switching of the booting process was successful (transferring the primary booting function to the SSD). So I kept the HDD as it was, untouched.

4/ I went into the BIOS StartUp to change the booting order, then tried to boot from the SSD, but it showed the Error 1962 message. After several failed attempts, I gave up and went back to use the HDD as primary boot (reverting the order of the "Include" in the BIOS startUp).

5/ I re-formatted the SSD completely, and did the cloning a second time to make sure that it has not missed anything from the OS system. After checking that everything was duly copied/cloned on the SSD, I tried to reorganize the Booting order (in the BIOS StartUp menu) by including SSD and excluding HDD, and this time I thought that everything went OK. So I started to work on adding new applications to the PC and transfer folders and files to it from the external hard drives. But this is when I noticed that the new applications somehow landed in the (CSmiley Happy drive programs of the HDD and not the SSD. I told you about this odd problem, remember ? This is when you mentioned to me that the reorganization of the booting process to SSD was not successful as I thought, and that I have to redo it again, including and excluding things in a precise way. Which I did. And it was following this third re-booting exercise that the PC crashed.

 

Anyways, now that we are faced with this messy situation, I only have 2 choices: try to reboot with the PC with the standalone USB booting drive that I just created, and (if it fails) wait for the Recovery Disc to arrive from Lenovo.

Questions: (1) if by chance the standalone USB booting gets to open access to the PC, what should I do  after ? never turn the PC off until we can "repair" the OS boot function ? or until the Recocvery Disc arrives ? and (2) If the Recovery Disc is used (when received), should I try to put the OS software directly on the SSD rather than the HDD (so that we can use the SSD as the primary and sole booting device) ?

 

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Message 30 of 50

Re: Thinkcenter M910t-Add 3.5 inch HardDrivt to Secondary Drive Bay


@SGV2005 wrote:

I haven't had the chance to reboot the Lenovo M910T yet with the standalone USB boot drive that I created with Macrium Reflect (btw, you seemed to prefer that this standalone USB boot drive be made using PW instead of Macrium; any specific reason for that preference ?).

 

The two standalone USB boot media from the two products are not the same.  Each one includes its own product (i.e. either Partition Wizard on one and Macrium Reflect on the other), installed in such a way into the WinPE environment built on that USB media such that when you boot each USB drive the related product auto-launches automatically.  Both are based on WinPE for the running environment when you boot to that USB flash drive, and then the particular standalone version of that program appears automatically once WinPE initializes.

 

So depending on which standalone program you want to use, you would boot to either USB media.  If you want to run Macrium Reflect (in its standalone mode, which has its particular usage here that makes it preferable or necessary to running it under ordinary windows) then you boot to that media.  If you want to run Partition Wizard in its own standalone mode, then you boot to that media.

 

But you should be able to boot to both of these standalone WinPE-based media.  I've been talking about using the PW-standalone approach because even while you currently can't boot to regular Win10 from either HDD or SSD, you still should be able to boot to this standalone WinPE version of PW.  I want a screenshot from it (with columns spread so we can see all text, etc.) so it's necessary to be able to run it.  And at this moment standalone is our only option.

 

At this moment we have no need to run Macrium Reflect standalone, because (to be honest) you didn't do the right thing when you un-boxed the M910t.  We have no "near-factory-state system image backup" of the HDD to do our own Macrium Reflect restore from.

 

The right thing really would have been if you had installed Macrium Reflect immediately after booting your new M910t for the first time and after going through the usual Windows first-time setup procedure.  With Macrium Reflect now installed you could have then done what you really should have done at this point which is to take a complete (i.e. all partitions on the HDD, every one of them) "system image" backup onto one of your external backup drives.  So now you have all of the Lenovo factory-provided partitions from the HDD preserved forever on your backup drive, available to be restored by Macrium Reflect STANDALONE if you needed to do it (which really we currently do, obviously) in order to "return to near-factory state".

 

This isn't quite a real "Lenovo system recovery" restore to genuine Lenovo-factory state (i.e. even before you powered it on yourself for the first time), but it's sure close enough.  It's right after first-time startup.  And all the partitions on the HDD would be backed up, as they looked immediately after this first-time usage. So you could then use Macrium Reflect STANDALONE to restore all of those partitions back to the HDD, and you would once again be back at that point in time.

 

Note that this really absolutely should have been done prior to any other software install, or re-partitioning of the HDD, or cloning, or anything.  This should have been your "recovery method" which we'd make use of right now to get you working again for absolute sure (since that near-original Windows first-time environment obviously was working perfectly right then, booted from the HDD and before you installed the SSD and started that partitioning and cloning process).

 

Unfortuantely, this option does not now exist for us to use Macrium Reflect STANDALONE to restore that original near-factory "system image" of all partitions on the HDD which definitely was working at that time.  You now need to await the arrival of official Lenovo "recovery media" which I myself have never used but I suspect it will be another way to restore your HDD to the way it looked when it left the factory, before your actual first-time power on and usage.

 

So unless we can get things working again in the meantime, when you do get the official Lenovo "recovery media" please take my advice and do things right.  Before doing anything else, at the first opportunity you get install Maacrium Reflect into your new Win10, and run a complete "system image" backup of ALL partitions on the HDD to one of your external 5TB USB drives (preferably the one which shows as GPT with PW, not the other one which mysteriously shows as MBR which to me is impossible for full use of a 5TB drive).

 

 

One additional note, on Macrium Reflect usage.  When you create the definition for a "system image" backup job, you are given the option of naming the output MRIMG file.  You can let the program assign a meaningless but unique technical name, or you can manually enter your own English and human-friendly name.  I always use this latter method, so that the particular file name which appears in the backup folder conveys (in English) what it contains.  This is extremely helpful when browsing through the folder looking for the right file to select to RESTORE from, as the English file name is readable and you created it yourself to imply what the contents of that "system image" file are.

 

Note that when you create the definition for a backup, you select one or more partitions (from one or more drives, if you want to do that as well), and the single MRIMG output file from the job will then be usable to select one or more partitions from to restore.  So ANY one or more of the partitions contained in a single MRIMG file can be selectively restored (up to all of them, obviously).  Clearly the more partitions you include in a single backup job, the longer it takes to run and the larger is the single MRIMG output file. But it is a convenient way to just backup up "lots" or "everything", just to CYA in the event you do find yourself needing to restore something (or everything).  Better safe than sorry, and the backup job runs remarkably quickly.

 

And finally, when you save the backup job definition you just created, again pick a user-friendly English name that means something to you, and conveys what that backup definition XML file holds.  You don't need to understand XML, but only how that gets presented by Macrium Reflect when you run or edit the job.  So choose something you will understand for the saved job name, as well as fo the file name of the MRIMG output file.

 

For example...

 

Macrium_backup-name.jpg

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