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AD1523
What's DOS?
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎07-04-2017
Location: US
Views: 6,386
Message 1 of 3

Lenovo W530 RAM Upgrade options

I am looking to upgrade the ram that is in my Lenovo W530. Right now there is 8 GB of Ram in the system and I am looking to replace it with  32 GB. My big concern is getting the wrong Ram sticks and it not working. Do I have to go with the ones that are spec'ed out through the Lenovo site or is there another good manufacturer that I can buy from?

Community SeniorMod
Community SeniorMod
Posts: 10,037
Registered: ‎01-01-2010
Location: US
Views: 6,340
Message 2 of 3

Re: Lenovo W530 RAM Upgrade options

32GB (4X8) is fine assuming you have a quad core CPU.  16GB DIMMS do not work.  I like Corsair Vengeance - something like 1600 mHz.  Either 1.5V or 1.35V would work.  Other people like other brands.  Avoid RAM with the word "value" in the name.


Rich


I do not respond to requests for private, one-on-one help. Your questions should be posted in the appropriate forum where they may help others as well.

If a response answers your question, please mark it as the accepted solution.

I am not an employee or agent of Lenovo.
CobraRGuy
Punch Card
Posts: 43
Registered: ‎05-21-2008
Location: US
Views: 6,165
Message 3 of 3

Re: Lenovo W530 RAM Upgrade options

Hi all,

 

I just wanted to add a little bit to what richk posted, which is all correct BTW. The key performance gains by changing or upgrading the SDRAM in one of these is to use the maximum SDRAM frequency supported on that particular machine (1600MHz for most W530s) and the lowest CAS (Column Address Strobe) latency. My W530 came equipped with 32GB of 1600MHz CAS 11 DDR3 memory. In other words, it takes 11 clock cycles (at 1600MHz) for a read or write cycle to complete. This works out to 0.625nS x 11 = 6.875nS per read/write operation. Compare this to 0.625nS x 9 = 5.625nS for CAS 9 SDRAM. This equates to the CAS 9 SDRAM being ~18.2% faster ((6.875-5.625/6.875) x 100). When you multiply this by the number of constant memory accesses, it really starts to add up.

In addition, using 1.35V memory (DDR3L) saves power, which means your machine will not only run slightly cooler, but your battery will last longer if you're not plugged in. These things all make a small difference, but added together, it can be noticable if you're pushing your machine to its limits. I hope this helps...

 

Thanks, CobraRGuy

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