cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Reply
Sepy
Punch Card
Posts: 78
Registered: ‎01-02-2016
Location: Switzerland
Views: 887
Message 1 of 11

Macrium Reflect Home Edition v6 with P70

Hi,

I'm trying to clone my P70 Samsung 950 C drive with Macrium on a SSD for backup.

The cloning goes well without error.

But it gives letter H for the new clone on SSD instead of C.

Is this normal?

In case of emergency if I have to use the clone SSD to bootup will it become C drive or will it stay as H drive?

Sepy

SeniorGuru
Posts: 2,264
Registered: ‎06-13-2013
Location: US
Views: 834
Message 2 of 11

Re: Macrium Reflect Home Edition v6 with P70

C is only assigned as the Windows boot partition, i.e. when you actually boot to it.

 

At any other time, whatever Windows you are booted to will be C and all other partitions and optical and removable USB drives, etc., are lettered as D, E, etc..  Since you say your newly copied C->SSD got assigned letter H, I'd say you already have other partitions etc. assigned D-G.  Running DISKMGMT.MSC will certainly show you what letters go where, on what drives, partitions, etc.

 

If you ever do need to boot to that backup copy from your SSD (this assumes of course that you either change the BIOS boot sequence in STARTUP tab, or use F12 at boot time to point to the SSD device), the Windows boot process will automatically make that Windows boot partition lettered as C (not H, as you see it now when booted to the original boot partition on 950).  And of course the other D-G partitions you currently also have will get assigned letters based on the SSD C, and how those other partitions get seen by Windows when running from the SSD C.

 

In other words, your current D-G as seen by Windows C from HDD may very likely get differently assigned when you boot from Windows C from SSD.  You can re-assign those letters using DISKMGMT.MSC when booted to some Windows (although Windows C can never be changed), to avoid confusion, so that no matter whether you run from 950 C or SSD C your other partitions will always have the same letters.  Just remember that if you continue to run periodic Macrium Reflect backups from 950 to SSD, each time you overlay the previously created copy which you ran from at least once to change the partition letters, well now you've just erased everything you previously did when running from Windows C from SSD.

 

NOTE:  you don't use "cloning" as a backup method with Macrium.  You run a "system image BACKUP".  Cloning is used to move Windows from one drive to another for real, not for periodic backups.

 

My recommendation is to actually run Macrium Reflect to take a "system image" backup of your 950 Windows C and the other small system reserved partitions needed for booting (say to an external USB 3.0 drive folder, or to your 850 SSD if that's what you want to do) as your backup method.  Should disaster hit and you need to recover, you use Macrium Reflect to restore that "system image" right back to the 950 itself.  You don't recover by altering your boot to come from the SSD.  You restore the "system image" backup to the 950.

 

Note that Macrium Reflect provides a wizard to add itself as a bootable option to Boot Manager (which assumes that your drives are all running properly, and you simply want to do a "restore".  It also provides a wizard to create standalone bootable media (optical or USB), so that you can run Macrium standalone if you had to replace your 950 which had become unusable but still had your SSD available for backup.

Sepy
Punch Card
Posts: 78
Registered: ‎01-02-2016
Location: Switzerland
Views: 804
Message 3 of 11

Re: Macrium Reflect Home Edition v6 with P70

Hello  ,

 

Thank you for your detail response.

 

Actually I bought the Macrium Reflect based on your recommendation. Your other recommendation NovaBackup I didn't like the yearly maintenance cost. I bought SyncBackPro instead.

 

I have two 950 SSD and one 850 SSD already in my P70. I am backing all my data on the 850 SSD. I have couple extra SSD which I was not using. I am using one of the extra 850 SSD in USB 3.0 for cloning. I do that once a week and it only takes about 5 minutes. If something goes wrong I can put 850 SSD clone in my P70 and just update my data from the P70 850 SSD. Any way this the strategy behind it.

 

I don't understand "Just remember that if you continue to run periodic Macrium Reflect backups from 950 to SSD, each time you overlay the previously created copy which you ran from at least once to change the partition letters, well now you've just erased everything you previously did when running from Windows C from SSD."

Can you please explain what you mean?

 

I have tried Imaging before but it never worked for me. I'm sure I was doing something wrong but what? I have no idea.

I studied Macrium Reflect manual for Imaging and again didn't get it.

 

I didn't like the Macrium Reflect wizard to add itself as a bootable option to Boot Manager but I made the USB standalone bootable media .

 

Thanks again

 

Regards

 

Sepy

 

SeniorGuru
Posts: 2,264
Registered: ‎06-13-2013
Location: US
Views: 791
Message 4 of 11

Re: Macrium Reflect Home Edition v6 with P70


@Sepy wrote:

 

I didn't like the Macrium Reflect wizard to add itself as a bootable option to Boot Manager but I made the USB standalone bootable media .


I'll reply separately to your points, to keep things simple and direct.

 

The Boot Manager option is for "everyday restore" usage, where your target hard drive for the partition(s) you're wanting to restore is also your boot drive, and is fully operational.  You simply want to restore one of the "system image" backups you've been taking each week, to recover from some situation where this is simply the right solution.

 

So the target drive is fully operational, and thus the Boot Manager partition is fine.  All you want to do is point to the proper image backup location and file on your backup drive (either your 850 SSD in your P70 where you say you've been doing backups  to, or perhaps from the 850 in the external USB 3.0 enclosure if that's where the image lives that you want to restore from), and run Macrium Reflect to do the restore.  So you don't need to boot to the standalone boot media (although of course you can do that too).

 

That's what the convenient Boot Manager launch of Macrium Reflect is for... when all hardware is fine, and you just want to restore a particular "system image" of one or more partitions.  Might as well just launch Macrium Reflect via Boot Manager for maximum convenience.  Same exact program and functionality as if from standalone boot media, just much easier to start.

 

Macrium_boot-manager.jpg

SeniorGuru
Posts: 2,264
Registered: ‎06-13-2013
Location: US
Views: 787
Message 5 of 11

Re: Macrium Reflect Home Edition v6 with P70

One more point regarding the Boot Manager option vs. the standalone bootable CD/USB methods of launching Macrium Reflect in order to restore the image of one or more partitions...

 

Let's say you experienced a real hardware failure, such that your 950 NVMe0 boot drive had to be replaced with a newly purchased card.  Well, now there is obviously no Boot Manager partition on the new "raw" drive for you to boot from even if you wanted to!  The drive is completely empty and unallocated when it arrives new.

 

Now THIS is what the standalone boot media is really intended for, to allow you to boot to Macrium Reflect in order to restore your backup images of the one or more partitions were on a hardware storage device that has for whatever reason been completely replaced... which also is your former boot drive, where the Boot Manager partition used to reside.  Clearly if you had to replace this drive, there would be nothing on it right out of the packaging, so you obviously couldn't possibly make use of the Boot Manager menu option in this particular situation.  In fact, that's why the standalone boot media fallback method is described as "rescue media", to rescue you from this extreme hardware failure involving physical replacement of your boot drive.

 

The image restore process will of course recreate all of the partition(s) you had from the image backups, exactly as they looked when you took the image backup.  You do of course also have the option of having Macrium Reflect resize the restored partitions if you want, say if the new target drive is smaller or larger than the original drive which produced the image backups.  But in the absence of any partition size override/change during the restore, the target partitions will be sized exactly the same as the source partition images on the backup.  Any extra space, say on a larger newly purchase drive, will simply remain unallocated and you can then do whatever you want with it.

 

SeniorGuru
Posts: 2,264
Registered: ‎06-13-2013
Location: US
Views: 782
Message 6 of 11

Re: Macrium Reflect Home Edition v6 with P70

To clarify your understanding of what Macrium Reflect can do for you, it is important to understand that the notion of "cloning" pertains to your objective of transplanting the several partitions involved in booting Windows (or any other OS's) from one physical drive to another.  For example, swapping the Lenovo-delivered Windows installed on a HDD spinner over to a 950 Pro NVMe0 drive.  Or, another example might be to want to simply replace your HDD spinner with an 850 Pro SATA3 SSD.

 

These are two similar situations, but in one case both source and target drives are available at the same time, and in the other case there is only one drive available at a time.  The objective is the same in both cases, but the mechanism required to accomplish the objective is necessarily somewhat different because of the physical differences. If you wanted to "clone" from A to B you could do it immediately and directly in a 1-step process, if both source and target drives are available at the same time.  However if both source and target drives are not available at the same time, you will have to accomplish your objective by a 2-step process: (a) first, take an "image backup" of A (say from the HDD spinner) to an intermediate location that is available, say in some large folder on some other partition or drive (very likely to an external USB 3.0 drive location) that is available and with enough free space to hold the "image" of the partition(s) you're copying, and (b) then, after you perform the hardware swap surgery to install your new drive (say to replace the HDD spinner with an 850 Pro), you perform an "image restore" from wherever you placed the image backup file to the newly installed target drive.

 

Note that because "cloning" is very much like "imaging", they're both under the primary tab category of "Backup".  You simply select the drive you want to be your source for the cloning, then click on the "clone this disk" link (as opposed to the "image this disk" link).  You will be presented with a new dialog window that shows all the partitions present on the source drive, and offers you a way to specify the target drive.  Just follow the dialog wizard to indicate which one or more partitions you want to "clone" from source to target, and you will accomplish your goal as a "cloning function"... all completed in 1-step.

 

Macrium_clone-01.jpg

SeniorGuru
Posts: 2,264
Registered: ‎06-13-2013
Location: US
Views: 778
Message 7 of 11

Re: Macrium Reflect Home Edition v6 with P70

On the other hand, if you are swapping drives (e.g. HDD spinner into 850 Pro SSD), such that only one drive at a time will be available, then you can't actually use the "clone" function which is 1-step.  This requires both source and target drives to be available simultaneously.

 

But you can accomplish the same result as "clone", i.e. copying the contents of the HDD spinner to the 850 Pro SSD, by a 2-step process of "image backup" out from source to intermediate image file placed somewhere that is available, followed by an "image restore" of that intermediate image backup file to the newly replaced ultimate target drive once you complete the hardware swap.

 

Functionally you've really accomplished the "cloning" purpose of transferring the contents of one or more partitions on a source drive to a target drive, but through a 2-step "image backup" followed by "image restore".

 

Now, consider the 2-step process I just described with a somewhat different perspective and purpose.  Say we didn't want to actually replace the HDD spinner with an 850 Pro SSD which might be a one-time situation.  Say we actually just want to run "part 1" every week, as a regular ongoing "system image BACKUP" of all the Windows Boot Partitions necessary to have 100% functionally operational in order to provide guaranteed 100% Windows system integrity at least as of every weekend's backup.  This is to provide the input file to a "system image RESTORE", should some time of irreparable corruption or infection occur in your Windows C-partition and a true restore of the 100% perfect working "system image" from last weekend be necessary for you to recover.

 

Well, this "system image RESTORE" is really conceptually "part 2" of the 2-step "cloning" process I described earlier, which was needed because both source and target drives were not available simultaneously.  So you used an intermediate storage location for the "image backup", so that you could then perform the drive swap and restore that "image backup" to the new replacement drive.  But in my current story, you're not really replacing hardware... you're simply restoring last weekend's "image backup" to the same location on the same drive hardware you backed it up from last weekend.  This is the "image RESTORE".

 

To set up this process, you again are in the Backup tab of Macrium Reflect.  And you click on the item specially put there to make it easy for you to instantly select, namely to take an "image backup" of whatever one or more partitions are required to preserve in "system image" form, so that they can potentially all be restored in unison at some later time should that be necessary. 

 

Macrium_image-01.jpg

 

You complete the rest of the setup for the backup, designating that the backup file is to be placed in some target location (typically on an external USB 3.0 drive typically used for all of your "image" and "data" backups, no matter what products you use). Macrium Reflect provides "space management" so you can specify how many generations of backup files you want to retain as each new one gets created, after which the oldest one will be automatically deleted as the next new one gets created.

 

Macrium_image-02.jpg

 

Note that in my screenshot, my external USB 3.0 backup drive is lettered "V" (I chose that letter using DISKMGMT.MSC because Verbatim is the manufacturer, so it's easy for me to remember the letter).  Also, I overrule the default "use the image ID as the file name" checkbox because I prefer to provide my own external file name so that I can easily know what's in that particular file simply from a folder directory.  The contents are no different no matter what the external file name is (i.e. image ID or my own name), and a suitable suffix will always be added if you retain multiple generations of the file (as you run the backups regularly each weekend). But by using my own assigned English-readable file name, it just makes things easier for me.

 

So again, your regular ongoing weekly backups are not "clone" images, which produces a completely immediately usable COPY of the source partition at the target location.  The weekIy backup process instead produces weekly  "image backup files" (containing "images" of the one or more partitions you've specified should be backed up in the job definition) stored as a unique file in some target folder on some other drive (internal or external), each of which can then be input to a RESTORE at a later time to restore any of the one or more partition images contained in that backup file.

 

For example, my regular weekly backups go to my external Verbatim USB 3.0 drive lettered V.  But if I'm out of the house and running "portable" (as I am this week, in a hotel), I don't want to be without some form of disaster/recovery "image backup" to recover from in case of disaster.  So I also have created a target backup image folder for Macrium on my 3rd internal drive (850 Pro SSD) which has lots of extra room on it (in the J partition, which takes up the complete 512GB drive).  This allows me to restore an known operating Windows while I'm on the road, should such an emergency arise.  And I have Macrium Reflect "rescue" on my Boot Manager Menu for convenience, but I also carry around a USB key drive bootable version of Macrium Reflect for an extreme emergency.

 

Macrium_image-03_resize.jpg

SeniorGuru
Posts: 2,264
Registered: ‎06-13-2013
Location: US
Views: 772
Message 8 of 11

Re: Macrium Reflect Home Edition v6 with P70


@Sepy wrote:

 

I don't understand "Just remember that if you continue to run periodic Macrium Reflect backups from 950 to SSD, each time you overlay the previously created copy which you ran from at least once to change the partition letters, well now you've just erased everything you previously did when running from Windows C from SSD."

 

Can you please explain what you mean?

 


The real point is that you should be using "image this disk" to create "image backup" files into a target folder (either on your spare internal 850 Pro, or to your externally USB-configured 850 Pro backup drive), as your weekly backup method.  This will create an accumulation of .MRIMG "image backup" files in that folder, as many as you care to hold onto just to make you feel secure.  Any one of them can be subsequently used as input to a RESTORE, to recover the operational Windows environment that existed at that moment when the "image backup" for that week was taken.

 

And of course, once RESTORE'd, when you reboot to the just-restored Windows you will be in EXACTLY the same Windows C-partition condition as you were back when that .MRIMG backup file was created.

 

Of course, you can also take "image backups" of any other partitions, not just the Windows boot partitions, including multiple generational versions.  And they can also be RESTORE'd from their .MRIMG files with the same complete flexibility as recovering the Windows boot partitions.

 

This approach provides complete backup/restore flexibility, with multiple generations of recovery capability covering as much time in the past as you care to retain.  Because Macrium Reflect produces its .MRIMG files from the "file table" of the partition, and also by default applies a "medium compression, like ZIP", the .MRIMG files for a given partition can be signficantly smaller than the actual partition (e.g. 45GB real into 25GB .MRIMG), also reducing the elapsed time for the backup job to run.

 

In contrast, doing a "weekly clone" to a spare drive, relying on that drive to be your backup (by swapping out the old hardware drive and replacing it with this "weekly cloned backup" should you need to recover from disaster... well, yes, that will also get you back to whatever condition is reflected on that drive when you cloned your operating Windows to it.  But why would you want to have just one possible recovery version (i.e. last week's "clone") instead of multiple versions (i.e. from as many .MRIMG files as you've held onto)?

 

Plus, the RESTORE from the .MRIMG file goes right back at your already installed hardware drive.  You don't need to swap drives at all to accomplish the recovery.  "Image backup" regularly to .MRIMG file, and Restore if you ever have to.  The RESTORE will overlay the [corrupted] target partition with the contents of the backup file for that partition.  Bingo.  You're done.

 

It takes the same 5 minutes to perform a BACKUP, as it does to perform a CLONE.  But in the case of BACKUP you produce an .MRIMG partition image file (suitably named and suffixed if necessary to support multiple generations of the same file name) which is then usable at some later time for purposes of RESTORE.  In the case of CLONE you are actually copying a source partition into a duplicate target partition.  RESTORE recreates the complete partition from the image contained in the .MRIMG file created by BACKUP, whereas CLONE produces a copy of the partition immediately and directly.

 

 

Sepy
Punch Card
Posts: 78
Registered: ‎01-02-2016
Location: Switzerland
Views: 711
Message 9 of 11

Re: Macrium Reflect Home Edition v6 with P70

Hello DSperber,

Again thank you very much for your in-depth explanation.

Sorry for my delayed response. I was away and when I came back I had to deal with two laptops, one with hardware problem and the other P70 with Windows 10 problem.

1- I tried the Boot Manager with Macrium Refelct but didn’t like it. In the morning I just like to boot-up to Windows 10. If I run in to problem I guess, I will use the USB Boot Manager (rescue media from Macrium Refelct).

2- I have started making weekly Image with all the partitions included (as suggested by you). Since I have the space on my USB SSD drive I decided to make a Full Image each time. Haven’t tried to see if it works.

3- I’m still making weekly Cloning as well. Old habit I guess.

4- I also make daily backup with versioning. I’m using Syncovery and I’m pretty happy with it.

5- For experiment I have started using Windows 10 FileHistory. Don’t know yet but I give it another week or two before deciding.

Have a nice weekend

Best regards,

Sepy

SeniorGuru
Posts: 2,264
Registered: ‎06-13-2013
Location: US
Views: 687
Message 10 of 11

Re: Macrium Reflect Home Edition v6 with P70


Sepy wrote:

4- I also make daily backup with versioning. I’m using Syncovery and I’m pretty happy with it.

5- For experiment I have started using Windows 10 FileHistory. Don’t know yet but I give it another week or two before deciding.



I'm glad you've settled in on an acceptable method of using Macrium Reflect to do your weekly system image backups, although fortunately you haven't yet had an "event" serious enough to require restoring from them.

 

Just for practice, it might not be a bad idea for you to at least go through those steps once, to guarantee that you can in fact boot from your USB recovery media and that it can in fact see all of your image backups from the connected USB drive.  It doesn't take long to actually DO the restore, so just for a drill you might manually run a backup (under Windows for simplicity, or you can even do it booted to your USB recovery media if you want to exercise that capability as well), and then turn right around and retore it just so you see how this all really works should you ever need to do this when you have a "real fire".

 

As far as folder/file backups, I know I'd mentioned NovaBackup way back as my preferred product of choice.  I've been using it simply almost forever, in fact probably ever since I finally stopped using IBM's OS/2 operating system on my PCs as my dual-boot OS of choice and reverted to just Windows fulltime. With OS/2 I had been using a product named Sytos Premium for folder/file backups and was writing to an HP SCSI DAT tape drive I had in my machines.  In fact, I still do have HP SCSI DAT tape drives in my two desktop machines because up until 3-4 years ago I was still running folder/file backups to DAT tape using NovaBackup (it's one of the very few products that supports tape as backup media, which is another reason I chose it originally when leaving OS/2 permanently).  But for the past few years I've been running my backups to external 2TB USB 3.0 spinner exclusively.  Tape vs. disk is a discussion for another day.

 

But regarding NovaBackup, I know you mentioned previously that its non-free "annual maintenance" charge as a "deal breaker".  Actually, it's only $12.49/year for me.  I feel this to be a VERY small price to be paying as my way of supporting to an ongoing vendor with employees who actually does stay in business and provide periodic version updates throughout the year.  They've been extremely responsive to my comments, complaints, bug reports and product improvement suggestions over the many years I've been using the products.  I was part of their beta program and forum years ago when they were creating a significantly improved product (e.g. finally implementing "generational maintenance" with automatic purging of older versions as newer ones get created).

 

Note that I also pay an annual support fee to Macrium, as well as to vendors of other non-free software or Internet products or services which I use regularly in an ongoing manner.  How else can I show my real appreciation for "a job well done", that I myself make use of day-to-day.  Why shouldn't they be compensated for their fine efforts?

 

Anyway, I didn't mean to rant.  I really only wanted to get back to NovaBackup as an excellent folder/file backup.  I see that you've adopted Syncovery which I'd never heard of until now, but which looks like a fine product.  As Win7 is my Windows for everyday use I don't typically use Win10 except to experiment.  So I also never knew about Win10 FileHistory from MS until now.

 

For me, as a longtime user of NovaBackup, I honestly just can't find any reason to to look for a replacement.  I have no complaints they haven't responded to and corrected or enhanced satisfactorily, and the product has never failed me.  No matter whether my recovery situation is to get an older versions of a file back that I've unwittingly deleted or corrupted some time ago and not discovered it until much later, or whether I have an actual "situation" that restoring selected or all folders/files on a data partition (or in C:\Users or elsewhere on C) is the proper recovery action, NovaBackup has made it a simple and straightforward and quick and easy job.  Having instant random access to all backup files on external USB (as opposed to requiring the use of multiple physical DAT tapes accessed sequentially) as the input to the restore process, coupled with the superb "time-based version restore" capability of the product and the very simple intuitive Explorer-like folder/file tree view as the GUI, well I just don't want to stray.

 

It's this standard, plain and simple no-nonense old fashioned Explorer Tree GUI that I like.  It's the same reason I use Free Commander XE (with its wonderful extensions and enhanced capabilities) as my "Explorer replacement" most of the time.  I simply cannot live without Free Commander XE because of it's GUI, and it is installed on all of my machines and any machine I build or maintain for friends/family.  Well, I feel similarly about the NovaBackup GUI.

 

Furthermore, the automatic scheduling function works perfectly and intuitively.  I run a monthly FULL backup (on the 1st of each month, for ALL selected folders/files that have ongoing content updates), and I run a nightly INCREMENTAL backup (which picks up anything I've worked on in the past 24 hours).  I have special on-demand occasional backups for much larger special needs, e.g. for very large video/image/music file collections that don't normally change very often.  But in contrast, the camera image folders that my cousin has are included in her "FULL/INCREMENTAL" backups as they are part of her "daily life" and required geting backed up regularly.  Obviously everybody's data needs differ.

 

So just as my own pitch on NovaBackup and why I like it, here are a few examples.

 

(1) Backup is a very simple standard 2-pane Explorer Tree showing folders on the left pane,and contents of the selected folder in the right pane.  You expand folders as needed, and simply check the folders/files (on left pane or right pane) you want to backup, as you'd intuit.

 

Backup_01_resize.jpg

 

(2) Normally, for a simple restore situation you would probably just go to recover a previously backed up folder/file by selecting the specific backup dataset from your collection on external USB drive.  You have created the dataset names when you set up the backup job to run (and NovaBackup automatically appends a date/time suffix to your primary dataset name prefix when it runs the backup job), and you know where the latest versions of things are that you are now wanting to recover from.  That is standard "media-based restore", where you pick the dataset to restore from, and then you select the folders/files to recover from that dataset.

 

But where NovaBackup really shines (and has a VERY simple and intutive GUI to deal with this particular need) is when (a) you may have multiple versions of a file, each with a somewhat different name... say with a date suffix you've added for your own differentiation, or (b) you may have multiple versions of a file, each with the exact same name, where it's only the date/time in the directory which distinguishes them.  NovaBackup has a feature named "time-based restore", which specifically is designed to deal with this class of recovery need.  I would imagine Syncovery and Win10 FileHistory also have their own GUI and method of dealing with this class of recovery need (both of which I have not seen, so I can't comment).  But for me NovaBackup's GUI is supremely simple and straightforward, and cannot imagine any better way to let the user solve the problem.

 

In "time-based restore", NovaBackup sums up the XML backup logs for all of the backup media in the complete current collection of all backup datasets, and then sorts and organizes them internally so that the Explorer-like GUI presentation shows you "conceptually" ALL of the files which are or have ever been in a folder with that file actual name.  So for the first type (a) of recovery I mentioned above, you simply have a "virtual folder" whose presented file names can be selected from.  The "virtual folder" is how this folder appears on the sum of all of the backup datasets, thus containing ALL of the files which have ever been in that folder over time, as represented by all of the versions of backup datasets you have containing a backup of that folder.

 

So just as you'd expect intuitively when presented, you can simply check whichever folders/files you want to restore from the left or right panes.  NovaBackup then determines WHICH BACKUP DATASETS must be accessed in order to accomplish your restore needs as reflected by the folder/file boxes you checked.

 

enWEC3

 

Furthermore, for my second situation (b) described above where multiple versions (with different file date/time) of the exact same file name might exist on multiple backup datasets, you can select the folder/file in either left or right pane, and then intuitively right-click to produce the "version history" of that folder/file.  This presents an intuitive scrollable list of ALL of the versions of that identically named folder/file.  You then simply check the one (or more!) version you'd like to restore.

 

4LGM70

 

If you select just one to be restored from this version history list, NovaBackup restores just that one with that exact name.  If you select more than one, then they are ALL restored... with a date/time suffix added (from the date/time of the backup dataset) so that you can then yourself examine each one manually to decide which is the one you really want to keep.  You can then delete the other extraneous ones, and manually rename the one you kept by deleting the NovaBackup-applied date/time suffix.

 

And one more final "goodness" from the people at NovaStor in this wonderfully robust time-based restore functionality. There's a "time slider" at the top of the GUI, which has a default position all the way to the right, reflecting the most recent date/time of any backup dataset in your collection.  So the presentations of folder/files corresponding to that time slider date/time show you the "most current" perspective.  Whatever is the most recent (and all previous) available versions of a folder/file as of that time slider date/time, that is what gets shown.  But you can manually pull the slider to the left, and the GUI presentation of folders/files shown now reduces as expected, so that the only the most recent (and all previous) versions of a folder/file AS OF THAT OLDER TIME SLIDER DATE/TIME... that is what gets shown.

 

So if you're looking for the version of a folder/file that you know you had AS OF SOME DATE IN THE PAST, the time slider can be used to let NovaBackup "do the filtering for you".  It will automatically present the most recent (and all prior versions) of that folder/file, as of your time slider date.

 

Remarkably well thought out functionality, as a remarkably simple and intuitive solution to a complex and sophisticated need we all have run across.

 

So, to each his own of course.  But I really am a fan of NovaBackup and the vendor NovaStor.  Same as for Macrium.

 

 

Check out current deals!


Shop current deals

Top Kudoed Authors