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paa55112
Punch Card
Posts: 59
Registered: ‎01-11-2010
Location: US
Views: 1,006
Message 1 of 7

P50 Win 10 Anniversary Update Won't Install

The Win 10 AU fails to install with error:0x80070002-0x20009.

I have a cloned SSD and use the old HDD for data as Drive D:

I've tried the standard update and also the MediaCreationTool.exe, I have also tried

to install with the HDD disabled.

 

Any help ?

P50 20ENCTO1WW | 6700HQ | 32 GB RAM |M1000M |512 SSD
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Community SeniorMod
Posts: 8,012
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Location: US
Views: 995
Message 2 of 7

Re: P50 Win 10 Anniversary Update Won't Install

If you cloned your original disk, your BCD (boot configuration data) table in the UEFI partition may be damaged.  On a different model, I went through a similar problem.  That machine had a cloned install that had been through other major updates without issue, but the anniversary update just wouldn't go.  I spend much too much time messing around with it before giving up.  You may just need a clean install.


Rich


I do not respond to requests for private, one-on-one help. Your questions should be posted in the appropriate forum where they may help others as well.

If a response answers your question, please mark it as the accepted solution.

I am not an employee or agent of Lenovo.
SeniorGuru
Posts: 1,975
Registered: ‎06-13-2013
Location: US
Views: 962
Message 3 of 7

Re: P50 Win 10 Anniversary Update Won't Install

Did your P50 with HDD arrive with GPT partitioning or MBR partitioning?  What software did you use to clone over to SSD (M.2 Samsung NVMe DIY install I assume, or what specifically)?

 

When you did your original cloning from HDD to new SSD, did you also copy all of the additional partitions (i.e. the 100MB system_reserved where Boot Manager and boot menu live, and the 128MB GPT reserved as well if your HDD came with GPT partitioning)?  Did you also copy the Lenovo Q "recovery" partition to the SSD?

 

And finally, when you reverted your original HDD for a second "data" drive did you actually wipe out everything on the HDD, and then create a single partition on it (you said it's lettered D)? Is that drive now MBR or GPT, and the additional Lenovo-provided partitions are no longer there?  In other words, is the machine now booting from cloned "system_reserved" on the M.2 SSD, or is it still booting from the original "system_reserved" on the HDD if you left it there?

 

What does your BIOS boot sequence look like?  Is the first item "Boot Manager", or is it your NVMe0 drive?

paa55112
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Posts: 59
Registered: ‎01-11-2010
Location: US
Views: 957
Message 4 of 7

Re: P50 Win 10 Anniversary Update Won't Install

Thanks for the insight. I used Paragon Migrate OS to SSD 4.0 (DIY) and it seemed to work problem free.

But I noticed that my Data HDD(DSmiley Happy had a "EFI" partition just like SSD Drive C.

I now have deleted that partition and W10 AU has been successfully installed. So I conclude that Windows

update didn't like 2 EFI partitions. I can't remember how I initialized D:. I probably just formated it

and the original Lenovo partition structure remained .

P50 20ENCTO1WW | 6700HQ | 32 GB RAM |M1000M |512 SSD
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Views: 953
Message 5 of 7

Re: P50 Win 10 Anniversary Update Won't Install


@paa55112 wrote:

I used Paragon Migrate OS to SSD 4.0 (DIY) and it seemed to work problem free.

But I noticed that my Data HDD(DSmiley Happy had a "EFI" partition just like SSD Drive C.

I now have deleted that partition and W10 AU has been successfully installed. So I conclude that Windows

update didn't like 2 EFI partitions. I can't remember how I initialized D:. I probably just formated it

and the original Lenovo partition structure remained .


Remaining open question (although it's probably too late now to see what things looked like when you were having your W10 AU problem), is what your BIOS boot sequence looked like.  If you did have the two EFI/System partitions (i.e. "system_reserved"), one on HDD and a second on NVMe then you actually may have still been booting from your HDD's Boot Manager and using the cloned Win10 partition over on the M.2 NVMe drive.  That's certainly "legal", although obviously a bit confusing if you thought you'd truly cloned the HDD over to NVMe, and then truly re-purposed the HDD for "data".

 

Or, maybe that didn't happen and Paragon copied everything successfully from HDD to NVME and also somehow changed things so that booting actually took place from NVMe.  Maybe it was just the appearance of the two identical EFI/system partitions that confused Win10 AU... until you deleted the one residually on HDD (which suggests it couldn't have been what you were booting from since the cloning, since you have deleted it now and there's no resulting problem).

 

You can see how this could be confusing, even to us as it is now since we don't really know exactly what things looked like both before and after the cloning surgery, unless you actually took manual control after the cloning to (a) configure the BIOS to be sure you were booting from the NVMe and not original HDD, and (b) deleted ALL partitions from your HDD and create one (or more) new "data" partitions on that drive.  The Lenovo BIOS provided a "Boot Manager" item which is a bit vague, especially when the machine was delivered with an HDD that contained EFI/System partition where Boot Manager lives, and then you cloned it to an NVMe so now you have two.

 

The most unambiguous way to configure things is to go into the BIOS and actually set either HDD or NVMe0 as your 1st drive in the boot sequence (following USB HDD so that you can boot instead to an inserted USB drive if you want to).  That way there's no confusion to anybody.  It may have also avoided your Win10 AU issue.

 

Anyway, in the end "you emerged victorious" by deleting the ambiguous duplicate EFI/System partition still residually left on your HDD.  In the end that's what's most important. You obviously hadn't "cleaned house" on the HDD after the cloning step, but simply re-formatted the original Win10 C-partition on HDD and re-booted, thus allowing it to be assigned as D to your newly booted Win10 partition that had been cloned to NVMe0.

 

MiniTool Partition Wizard (PW) is a very highly regarded tool, and the Free edition is perfectly usable here.  It could have been used to easily DELETE all originally provided partitions on the HDD (including EFI/System, GPT reserved, Windows C, and Lenovo Q), leaving it now entirely empty and unallocated.

 

Then you use PW to allocate one (or more) new partitions on the HDD specifying either GPT or MBR for the partitioning method you want to go forward with for any of the partitions created on this drive. In your case you could have created the one D partition you intended to use, and it would have been allocated to consume the entire available unallocated space.

 

In any case, the right final configuration is to only have one EFI/System partition, on the true boot drive (HDD or NVMe0), not two.  And the BIOS should have NVMe0 specified as the first drive (after USB HDD), again to avoid any possibility of confusion for whatever "Windows Boot Manager" is supposed to suggest.  All other irrelevant boot options (e.g. "boot from LAN", if that's not possible) for your system can just be "excluded" to truly avoid any confusion or ambiguity.

Maximus2016
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Message 6 of 7

Re: P50 Win 10 Anniversary Update Won't Install

I had the same problem after cloning the HDD onto and SSD and it was apparently becaue the Windows 10 Redstone 1607 update can't handle multiple UEFI partitions on the machine.

 

Eventually I found a workaround on reddit. These steps finally allowed the 1607 install to work.

https://www.reddit.com/r/Windows10/comments/4vum9b/installation_failure_windows_failed_to_install/d6...

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Message 7 of 7

Re: P50 Win 10 Anniversary Update Won't Install


@Maximus2016 wrote:

I had the same problem after cloning the HDD onto and SSD and it was apparently becaue the Windows 10 Redstone 1607 update can't handle multiple UEFI partitions on the machine.

 

Eventually I found a workaround on reddit. These steps finally allowed the 1607 install to work.

https://www.reddit.com/r/Windows10/comments/4vum9b/installation_failure_windows_failed_to_install/d6...


Ok.  So we're learning about the negative impact of having multiple EFI/System partitions on trying to apply the 1607 update.

 

But in the end, the story really is about what should be done when cloning an existing bootable environment from HDD to a second drive (SSD or NVMe or even a second HDD).  No matter what vendor's cloning software product you use to conveniently and easily accomplish the copying (since that's really all it is) of one or more "source partitions" on one drive over to a matching set of "target partitions" on a second drive, you still need to do your own housecleaning after the fact, to end up where you really want to be.

 

The housecleaning steps include:

 

(1) get into the BIOS and change the boot sequence so that you are now going to boot from the newly created target drive.  Exclude unnecessary alternate boot devices that are irrelevant for your environment, to keep the "included" list small and meaningful.  Set the physical drive (e.g. NVMe0) as the first entry following USB HDD (and also CD/DVD optical if you have one of those), rather than selecting "Windows Boot Manager" to be that first entry.  This item (which is something relatively new to me, anyway) is probably assumed to be where the EFI/System partition lives... assuming it's unique, I guess.  Ambiguous.  I don't know which one is used if there are two, one on each of multiple drives.  Is the boot menu in all of them kept in sync?  Or maybe just the original one?  Who knows?  Avoid it all: just go with NVMe0 and be explictly absolutely 100% clear and unambiguous.

 

(2) re-boot, and confirm that Windows C is truly coming from the new drive, and that any other partitions on other drives are lettered above C (including the original Windows C partition on the source drive, which should now be seen as D, or E or something higher than C).  The booted Windows partition should always be C, and this will confirm you are actually booting from the cloned Windows partition on the target drive out of the cloning process.

 

(3) now that you've confirmed you are booting successfully from the cloned location and running Windows properly from it, you can launch Partition Wizard to delete all of the partitions from the original HDD.  Delete EVERYTHING, to clean house entirely.  You can then use Partition Wizard to create one or more new "data" partitions on that drive (assigning partition letters D, E, etc. for them as they are created), to genuinely re-purpose it for "data".  You can also subsequently use Partition Wizard or DISKMGMT.MSC to change any of the previously assigned partition letters (either by you or by Windows default assignment), if you'd like to reconfigure things to your liking.  Only C cannot be changed.

 

Note that there's still a question regarding the Lenovo-provided "recovery" partition (typically delivered with an assigned Windows letter of Q), used to restore your Lenovo computer's Windows environment to "factory delivered state".  My own feeling is that I NEVER use it, nor do I have to.  I use Macrium Reflect to take initial "system image" backups to an external USB 3.0 backup drive, of all the delivered "factory partitions".  This is my "factory backup" should I ever really need to or want to go back that far.

 

But in reality I never use it, opting instead for normal ongoing regular weekly "system image" backups which is my fallback disaster recovery in case I need to take that extreme step.  I've spent too much time on my system since opening the factory carton for the first time, installing vendor product apps, customizing, creating data files, etc., and I have not the slightest desire to repeat any of that again if I don't have to.

 

By taking regular ongoing automatically scheduled weekly "system image" backups of my Windows system partitions (in order to provide disaster recovery of an operational Windows) I don't need to ever fear losing much, if anything, except for what I've worked on in the past week.  And by taking regular ongoing automatically scheduled nightly/monthly "data" backups ("incremental" nightly and "full" monthly), I am fully protected against accidental data loss or corruption.

 

Bottom line: I will never need the Lenovo-provided "recovery" partition.  So I delete it as part of my own re-purposing of that factory HDD following cloning to NVMe.  That HDD is 100% available for "data" partition(s).

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