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CNicolas
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Posts: 3
Registered: ‎05-28-2016
Location: CA
Views: 8,397
Message 1 of 7

P50 graphic card upgrade

I have a Thinkpad P50 laptop workstation. I use to work with Photoshop and I had several crashes even with lowest performance settings. I'm wondering if it's related to my graphic card (Nvidia Quadro m1000m) and how I can bypass this problem. Do I need to upgrade some stuff?

SeniorGuru
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Registered: ‎06-13-2013
Location: US
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Message 2 of 7

Re: P50 graphic card upgrade

Are you running with BIOS set to "hybrid graphics" or "discrete graphics"?

 

Recognizing the impact on battery lifetime while running portable, I'd suggest using "discrete graphics" and installing the latest nVidia retail Quadro Series (notebook) driver rather than using the back-level driver provided in the Lenovo Optimus driver package (both Intel and NVidia) for the P50.

 

See if that improves your stability and performance results.

Guru
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Message 3 of 7

Re: P50 graphic card upgrade

@DSperber

 

Just an observation here. You seem to consistently not believe that the graphics drivers that Lenovo has customized for the specific laptops are incorrect and recommend that people instead go directly to the NVIDIA website for drivers. That is a receipe for graphics disaster IMO. I also don't think that it is appropriate to denigrate the ThinkPad developers by always stating that their work is downlevel and disfunctional.


P70 XEON 1505, BIOS 2.31, UHD 4k Display, 64GB, M3000M NVIDIA GPU, RAID1 1TB Samsung PM981 PCIe-NVMe SSD x 2, 2x Samsung 850 Pro 1TB SSD. EM7455 WWAN
P1. BIOS 1.23,Xeon Processor, 32GB, PM981 1TB x 2, RAID1
T470s, 16GB RAM, BIOS 1.10, i7-7500, WQHD display, 512GB PM961 PCIe NVMe SSD
SeniorGuru
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Message 4 of 7

Re: P50 graphic card upgrade


@harrisb wrote:

@DSperber

 

Just an observation here. You seem to consistently not believe that the graphics drivers that Lenovo has customized for the specific laptops are incorrect and recommend that people instead go directly to the NVIDIA website for drivers. That is a receipe for graphics disaster IMO. I also don't think that it is appropriate to denegrate the ThinkPad developers by always stating that their work is downlevel and disfunctional.


Well...

 

I'm certainly not trying to denigrate the ThinkPad developers by suggesting the use of the much newer official nVidia drivers for the hardware in the machine.  Don't know why you would think that's the point of my suggestion when I recommend going with "discrete graphics" and the latest nVidia driver for the ThinkPad hardware as a possible to solution to graphics issues posted here.

 

The Optimus driver from Lenovo package includes a combination of both Intel driver and nVidia driver, but do you know specifically that the nVidia component has been "specially modified" by Lenovo?  Do you know that there is specifically something special and/or unique to the "Optimus package" version in the released driver download package version of either Intel driver or nVidia driver that is only available from Lenovo, other than that this package installs BOTH an Intel driver along with an nVidia driver and presumably has been "tested together" by Lenovo for the Thinkpad and "works" to support Optimus mode as implemented by the Lenovo firmware in these machines?  So if I were using Optimus mode, I agree using the Lenovo-provided driver package would make perfect sense since both drivers are part of the functionality. But I'm not using Optimus mode.

 

I understand we trust that the software files released by Lenovo have been lab-tested and verified by them, same as the reason for buying hardware factory installed by Lenovo is because it is then "warrantied" by Lenovo.  Sure, anything you do or add "3rd-party" is "at your own risk". But has that prevented many of us from performing our own after-market hardware upgrades, e.g. installing memory upgrades, and swapping/adding larger SSD and NVMe cards for Lenovo-provided HDD spinners or blank drive bays?  Do we not also install vendor-provided software for that hardware, e.g. Samsung Magician and Samsung 950 Pro NVMe Controller driver because our experience instills confidence, even though this didn't come from Lenovo?

 

As far as possibly being a "recipe for graphics disaster" to use a retail nVidia graphics driver, well I think that is certainly over-the-top and unjustified.

 

Once you turn off the Intel graphics completely through setting of "discrete graphics" in the BIOS, and you've opted to NOT USE OPTIMUS MODE, any hesitation regarding feeling comfortable using the latest nVidia driver should disappear... in my opinion.  You're not using the Intel driver along with the nVidia driver in a Lenovo lab-tested and lab-verified Optimus mode for the combined Intel/nVidia graphics hardware configuration.  You've really now just got a single nVidia graphics chip in your machine.  In my opinion it's no different from installing a discrete graphics card after-market in a desktop machine, thus bypassing the built-in graphics capability in the CPU/motherboard through the "AUTO" option in the motherboard's BIOS which just recognizes the new discrete graphics card and uses it as a 100% replacement for the onboard built-in graphics.

 

From my own personal experience I've been using "discrete graphics" set in the BIOS of my W530 for three years along with the latest retail nVidia drivers for the K1000m in that machine and have never had a "disaster" or any graphics anomaly of any kind whatsoever for that matter from this method.  It's been absolutely and completely problem-free all of that time. I keep the nVidia graphics driver updated regularly as "preventative maintenance", even though I actually have no problems to think might be resolved by this approach.  I trust nVidia software.  Same as applying Windows Updates regularly, because I also trust Microsoft software [well, mostly].

 

And I've now been doing the same with my P70 for five months now, running with "discrete graphics" in the BIOS and keeping current with the latest nVidia graphics driver for my M3000M.  And again I've never had any graphics issue of any knd whatsoever.  No "graphics disaster".  I honestly don't think any such thing can occur.

 

By eliminating the Intel graphics via BIOS "discrete graphics" setting, I have a machine that appears to only have a discrete nVidia chip in it.  And my experience has been that the driver as provided by nVidia for that nVidia chip works perfectly.  If I'd ever had even a single problem with this approach I'd probably be very gun-shy to continue this practice myself, and certainly would be hesitant to suggest it to others.  But I never have had even one problem, ever.  So I'm not hesitant at all.

 

To the contrary, I'm completely comfortable continuing to recommend this non-Optimus "discrete graphics" approach as a way of avoiding all Optimus-mode graphics performance anomalies, coupled with use of the retail nVidia driver.  I want best possible graphics performance, for laptop screen and external monitor, 100% of the time.  Sure, this is subject to the obvious recognized impact on portable-mode battery lifetime.

 

I don't use Optimus mode on my Thinkpads, and don't feel the need to stay exclusively with the Lenovo-tested package of Optimus-verified Intel/nVidia graphics drivers. Running "discrete graphics" I believe I've been released from that obligation, and look to nVidia exclusively for graphics driver support for the nVidia chips in my Thinkpads... same as I do with my desktop machines. This is not denigrating Lenovo developers, nor is it a "recipe for disaster".

CNicolas
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Message 5 of 7

Re: P50 graphic card upgrade

Very interesting... since i'm new with laptop and performance settings I was narrow thinking!
After reading DSperber first reply and talked to my girlfriend it appears that I haven't changed my performance setting to the highest (the one on the battery icon).
The performance I talked in my first message was those of Photoshop, not the computer.
Finally with computer high performance settings, working in Photoshop seemed flawless... for now!
My problem (a very obvious one for someone experimented) look fixed and I hope it was just that simple setting!
At the end this conversation may open a door to further discussion around graphic cards and performances for the P50, because when I've tried searching for graphic cards updates from nvidia m1000m to m2000m I found nothing useful.
For me, the idea is if someday I want to upgrade things I wish I can find the right information and possibilities so I don't mess my computer because of my lack of knowledge.

Thanks for your fast response I appreciate a lot! Smiley Happy

JensDavid
SCSI Port
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Location: SE
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Message 6 of 7

Re: P50 graphic card upgrade

The behaviour of your laptop is described in the problems master thread for P50/P70. Try to run ThinkVantage System Update and update to latest Bios, etc. You can also right click on the Photoshop shortcut and choose Nvidia graphics instead of Intel. Intel graphics is the standard graphic card for Adobe applications. Since crashes related to heavy graphic applications, many users report that this solve thier problem with crashing laptops.

 

https://forums.lenovo.com/t5/ThinkPad-P-and-W-Series-Mobile/Severe-Crash-P50-while-zooming-in-Google... .

 

 

CNicolas
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Message 7 of 7

Re: P50 graphic card upgrade

Great, sounds good!

Like I said, my crash problem seemed fixed by turning on «High Performance» setting from the battery icon.

I should run Photoshop, even with lowest computer performance settings, without crashes so I'll try it out!

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