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Waldiv
Paper Tape
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎01-11-2018
Location: CZ
Views: 2,364
Message 1 of 10

P51 - Install second OS on second SSD: Windows Cannot Be Installed To This Disk ...

ThinkPad P51 with two hard disc. First SSD (CSmiley Happy - OS Windows 10. Second SSD (DSmiley Happy - I would like to install Windows 10 too. 

Yes, two Windows 10 on one computer. 

Capture1.PNG

 

 

 

When I try to install Win10 on second SSD, Win show error:

"Windows Cannot Be Installed To This Disk This Computer Hardware May Not Support Booting To This Disk" :

 

Capture.PNG

 

 

When I try to find solution, some help is update BIOS and driver from Intel AHCI controller.

I made it, but without effect. 

 

Capture2.PNG

 

Could you help mi with this issue please? 

Thank you. 

Guru
Posts: 620
Registered: ‎12-30-2017
Location: PL
Views: 2,354
Message 2 of 10

Re: P51 - Install second OS on second SSD: Windows Cannot Be Installed To This Disk ...

Could you please delete RAW partition from second disk and then try again?

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Waldiv
Paper Tape
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎01-11-2018
Location: CZ
Views: 2,326
Message 3 of 10

Re: P51 - Install second OS on second SSD: Windows Cannot Be Installed To This Disk ...

Hello Kacperas, 

thank you for this idea. After deleting RAW partiton, story continue, I get error 0x80300024.

I tried use DISKPART from this link: https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/windows/en-US/9b067db9-2019-4146-b9dd-40034d984c43/error... but nothing change, error 0x80300024 still. 

 

Guru
Posts: 620
Registered: ‎12-30-2017
Location: PL
Views: 2,320
Message 4 of 10

Re: P51 - Install second OS on second SSD: Windows Cannot Be Installed To This Disk ...

It seems, that you'll have to remove first SSD disk just for OS installation. Once it'll be done, you can install it again.

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ArthurHWalker
Token Ring
Posts: 117
Registered: ‎11-09-2015
Location: US
Views: 2,312
Message 5 of 10

Re: P51 - Install second OS on second SSD: Windows Cannot Be Installed To This Disk ...

I just got my P51 this week, and my drives come today. I'm planning to do something similar, so I've been Googling support files in anticipation of trouble.

This one might help:

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-hardware/manufacture/desktop/windows-setup-installing-using...

 

If I run into problems, or figure out how to do it on my machine, I'll jump back in the thread with whatever I figure out. 

Waldiv
Paper Tape
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎01-11-2018
Location: CZ
Views: 2,292
Message 6 of 10

Re: P51 - Install second OS on second SSD: Windows Cannot Be Installed To This Disk ...

Hello Kacperas, thank you for your idea. I had the same before, but I didn't try it. Now, it's working well and both system are useable on one computer. When I want to switch to another system, I press "F12" when is booting and select right system. Great! 

SeniorGuru
Posts: 2,321
Registered: ‎06-13-2013
Location: US
Views: 2,269
Message 7 of 10

Re: P51 - Install second OS on second SSD: Windows Cannot Be Installed To This Disk ...

Quite frankly, I'm a bit puzzled as to why two separate versions of Windows needed to be installed on two separate drives, using the F12 approach to selecting the boot drive.

 

Normally, adding a second (or third, etc.) bootable Windows to an already-existing bootable Windows  environment simply adds an additional boot-time menu entry on the Boot Manager menu list.  By default, a single-Windows menu doesn't display the Boot Manager presentation at boot time but simply goes directly to the one-and-only installed Windows.  But if you install a second (or more) Windows it now causes Boot Manager to actually present itself, with the two menu items (one of which is the pre-selected default which will boot after waiting for some default period (like 30 seconds, or 10 seconds) for you to make a manual override select, before just automatically using the pre-selected default.  But any of the secondary boot items presented can be manually selected instead.

 

So, that EFI System Partition (on a UEFI/GPT partitioning setup, which is how Win10 is installed on new hardware) is actually where Boot Manager and its menu data live.  This used to be the old "system reserved" partition for Legacy/MBR, which was the "active" partition that the BIOS selected to hunt down Boot Manager.  Today it actually shows as "Boot Manager" in the BIOS boot sequence list.  Alternatively you can just specify that drive in the BIOS boot sequence list, and it will seek out either the "active" partition for MBR or the "EFI System Partition" for GPT (which is also conceptually the "active' partition, presumably holding Boot Manager and its menu data).

 

So the second (or later) installed Windows doesn't have to go on a separate physical drive, and doesn't have to have its own separate EFI System partition with its own Boot Manager, thus making itself available to the F12 boot device option.  A second (or later) Windows can be ANYWHERE... including a second partition on the same physical drive where the first Windows already lives.  The install for the second Windows simply needs to have sufficient available unallocated space to create a new "system partition" and complete the install, on ANY physical drive.

 

In other words there should really only be ONE BOOT MANAGER PARTITON, and you already had one on your existing first physical drive.  If that Win10 was installed "from scratch" (or from Lenovo), you would have gotten a Boot Manager setup.  And then wanting to do a second Win10 install again "from scratch" would have wanted to find sufficient available unallocated space (that you would point the installer to), on some physical drive (either unallocated space on your existing drive, or a secondary drive) and the Win10 installer (same as the Win7 installer would do) simply adds a Boot Manager menu item for this secondary new Windows partition (wherever it might have been targeted), so that you can now choose to boot from either Windows at machine boot time... assuming you have the drive containing the Boot Manager partition as first in the BIOS boot sequence list.

 

At machine boot time the BIOS will hunt for that "Boot Manager" partition in UEFI/GPT setups (or find it, if you physically just point to the physical drive containing that partition as the item in the BIOS boot sequence list, instead of "Boot Manager"), and will launch Boot Manager which will read its menu list and present it to you.  This avoids any need to use the F12 approach, which is really a manual physical boot-time alternative to the intended Boot Manager and is also what you have to do if you have NOT conformed to the standard installation technique for installing a second Windows which would automatically have added it as a second item on the Boot Manager menu list.

 

So... I don't know how you went about installing the first Win10. Did it come from Lenovo, or did you install it yourself?

 

Just as an example, I bought a Lenovo Thinkpad P70 with a delivered 2.5" HDD spinner that contained pre-installed with Win7 and which had "Boot Manager" as the default first item in its BIOS boot sequence list.  I added my own M.2 Samsung 960 Pro NVMe drive (in the NVMe0 drive bay), and then cloned Win7 from the HDD spinner over to the M.2 NVMe drive, and then changed the BIOS to show NVMe0 (instead of Boot Manager) to be first in the boot sequence list.  This forced the BIOS to scan the drive living in NVMe0 for an "active" MBR partition (or EFI System partition in UEFI/GPT), where the Boot Manager that lived in that partition was then launched.  In my cloned setup it was now the cloned Boot Manager on M.2 drive, which then booted to the cloned Lenovo-installed Win7 also living on the M.2 drive.  I then deleted the partitions from the original HDD spinner and re-used the HDD drive for "data".

 

Now I had left about 100GB unallocated on the M.2 Samsung 960 Pro, specifically to install Win10 as an additional Windows boot option.  So once I got my cloned arrangement finished and working, I then did a fresh install "from scratch" of Win10, to this 100GB unallocated space on the same physical M.2 drive where the cloned Win7 partition also lived.  And sure enough that completed, and sure enough a new second line item on the now-appearing boot time Boot Manager menu appeared, offering me the option of booting to Win10.  The original Win7 item was shown pre-selected as the default, but Boot Manager allows you to choose either... and not have to use F12 to accomplish this.

 

In other words F12 is intended when you have two drives, each of which has its own Boot Manager (or "active") bootable partition on it.  Boot Manager is intended for when you want to use a single Boot Manager partition on SOME drive, with a boot menu list that points to multiple bootable Windows "system" partition locations on one or more physical drives. 

 

The standard Windows installer (including for Win7, Win8/8.1 and Win10) understands Boot Manager, and creates that environment when doing a from-scratch install to an empty drive for the first time.  You will get a "system reserved" or "EFI System" partition that is the "active/bootable" partition containing the Boot Manager software along with the boot menu list data.  The first Windows installed this way would put the Windows C-partition (i.e. "system" partition) on that same drive.

 

Any additional secondary Windows installs in this environment will have that installer recognize the existence of a previously installed Windows and this Boot Manager partition on whichever drive it lives on (as found in the BIOS boot sequence), and after you point to the target location for the new second Windows to be installed at will add a second boot menu list item for this new second Windows, wherever you placed it.

 

That's how it SHOULD have worked... if the first install was done normally, and if the second install was done as expected.  You would end up with one Boot Manager partition (with a 2-item menu list) on the first drive along with that first Windows, and the second Windows wherever you placed it (either in some unallocated space you'd arranged for on your first drive say by using Partition Wizard to shrink existing partitions, or on your second physical drive assuming that second drive was empty with zero partitions or had sufficient unallocated space remaining on it even if there were other partitions on it).

 

Now if you DO remove the first drive in order to do a from-scratch fresh install to the second drive, you WILL end up with a second Boot Manager "active" partition as well as the second Windows "system" partition. And now you WILL need to use the F12 approach to selecting which drive/BootManager/Windows you want to boot to.

 

But honestly, this isn't necessary when multiple Windows versions are involved.  That's what Boot Manager is for: single Boot Manager partition on ONE drive, with a boot menu list that contains 1-n items pointing to 1-n bootable Windows "system" partitions living on one or more physical drives. No F12 boot method is needed.  You simply pick your boot Windows from the menu list presented by Boot Manager.

Guru
Posts: 620
Registered: ‎12-30-2017
Location: PL
Views: 2,257
Message 8 of 10

Re: P51 - Install second OS on second SSD: Windows Cannot Be Installed To This Disk ...

I got the impression, that you've missed the point of Waldiv's problem. They decided to install OS on separate disk, but Installer was refusing to do so. This problem was known since Windows 7. For the time of installation, all other disks has to be removed. As is impossible to add new bootloader records to disconnected disk, a separate bootloader was created. It seems, that they're OK with separate bootloaders, so there's no need to change it.

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SeniorGuru
Posts: 2,321
Registered: ‎06-13-2013
Location: US
Views: 2,239
Message 9 of 10

Re: P51 - Install second OS on second SSD: Windows Cannot Be Installed To This Disk ...


@Saperkus wrote:

I got the impression, that you've missed the point of Waldiv's problem. They decided to install OS on separate disk, but Installer was refusing to do so. This problem was known since Windows 7. For the time of installation, all other disks has to be removed. As is impossible to add new bootloader records to disconnected disk, a separate bootloader was created. It seems, that they're OK with separate bootloaders, so there's no need to change it.


Fascinating. I was unaware that there was a problem with the Win7 installer (or any installer for that matter) which prevented targeting the second Windows (be it win7, Win8/8.1 or Win10) on a separate physical drive.

 

I have two Skylake-based modern machines I'm going to experiment on, both of which have multiple internal drives that I can carve out 100GB of unallocated space on a drive other than the "boot drive" that currently contains my Boot Manager and boot menu.  One is my P70 laptop with three internal drives, where I already have Boot Manager and both Win7 and Win10 partitions all on the same drive.  So I will see if I can install a second Win10 (which would be the third Windows on the boot menu) on one of the two other internal drives in that machine.  I'll also see if I can install a second Win7.

 

The other machine is an ASUS-based desktop machine, also with three internal drives.  i currently only have Boot Manager and one Win7  partition on one of those drives.  So the experiment will be to see if either a second Win7 or first Win10 can be installed on one of the other two drives.

 

An interesting experiment would be to see what EasyBCD thinks and can do or not.  This is a very useful utility that can manually maintain the boot menu for the Boot Manager identified in the BIOS boot device list.  This includes the ability to add an item to the list for a Windows partition not currently on the list... e.g. for the second Windows partition on the second SSD (with the second Boot Manager as well) in this discussion.  In other words, even though the actual Win10 installer wasn't happy (unless you removed the first SSD during install to the second SSD), could a pointer to that second Win10 on the second SSD be manually added by EasyBCd to the first Boot Manager menu list.

 

Or, is there something different and problematic that has been born from UEFI/GPT, that didn't exist previously with legacy/MBR.  I say that because I know for a fact that many years ago (perhaps when XP was around and I was beginning to play with Win7) that I definitely had two Windows partitions on two physical drives (before the days of UEFI, and absolutely using MBR partitions), so it must have "worked" at one time in the past..

 

I will play with this (after taking suitable preventative backups, of course) and see what results.

SeniorGuru
Posts: 2,321
Registered: ‎06-13-2013
Location: US
Views: 2,178
Message 10 of 10

Re: P51 - Install second OS on second SSD: Windows Cannot Be Installed To This Disk ...

Ok. I finally got the time to try this out for myself on my P70 with three internal drives: two M.2 Samsung 950 Pro NVMe, and one 2.5" Samsung 850 Pro SATA.  The machine was delivered from Lenovo in early 2016 with Win7 installed on 2.5" HDD spinner as the only drive.

 

Here's the background and setup.

 

I installed the two M.2 Samsung 950 Pro NVMe drives, and used Macrium Reflect to clone Win7 from the HDD spinner over to one of the 950s, and went into the BIOS to change the boot device sequence list to now boot from NVMe0 (where Win7 had just been cloned to, along with the Boot Manager partition).  I then used Minitool Partition Wizard to delete all the original delivered partitions from the HDD spinner, and recreated one large "data" partition.  I also created several additional partitions on the second 950 also for use as "data" partitions.

 

A month later I replaced the 2.5" SATA HDD spinner drive with a 2.5" Samsung 850 Pro SATA drive (still just the same single large "data" partition), so that I was now three drives all SSD.

 

I then resized the partitions on my primary 950 Pro NVMe0 drive where Boot Manager and Win7 lived, in order to allocate 100GB of free space on this same drive for an install of Win10 (as a second bootable Windows on the one physical NVMe0 drive), accessed via Boot Manager.  With Macrium Reflect adding its own standalone recovery utility as a third item on the Boot Manager menu and with Win7 set as the pre-selected default auto-boot Windows (after 10 seconds of doing nothing to choose a non-default menu item), my Boot Manager screen before starting today's experiment looks as follows:

 

03_Boot-Manager-before-2nd-Win10-install.jpg

 

So going into this experiment, the Partition Wizard view of my drives and partitions is as follows (you can ignore the Verbatim fourth drive, which is my external USB 3.0 backup drive).  The NVMe0 drive (with both Win7 partition showing as C and Win10 partition showing as O) shows as Disk3 in the following screenshot, taken while booted to Win7.

 

Partitions.jpg

 

My plan was to shrink the J partition (shown on Disk1 in the above screenshot) which is on the 2.5" Samsung 850 Pro SATA drive, in order to leave about 100GB of additional unallocated space (in addition to the already unallocated 47GB reserved for "over-provisioning" use by Samsung Magician), to be used as the target for the install of the second Win10. 

 

My own intuition said that this second Win10 install to a new partition it would create in this unallocated space on Disk1 (if successful) should be automatically added by the Win10 installer to the existing Boot Manager menu (living in the System_Reserved EFI partition on Disk3).  So if all goes as planned I should end up with four bootable Windows options on the updated Boot Manager menu:  Win7, my existing Win10, the new second Win10, and Macrium Reflect Recovery.

 

After using Partition Wizard to shrink partition J on Disk1 in order to create the necessary 100+GB of unallocated free space on that drive to be the target of the new second Win10 install, my drive situation now looked as follows:

 

P70_drives-and-partitions.jpg

 

With everything now ready to go, I booted to my USB Win10 install media to begin.  And I selected that 148GB of unallocated space on the 850 Pro drive (which appears as "Drive 0" to the Win10 installer), only to run into an error message that stated "Windows cannot be installed on this drive".

 

01_Target-2nd-drive-when-MBR.jpg

 

When I clicked on "show details", it turns out the problem is that the drive is partitioned with MBR.  Win10 on a UEFI BIOS machine requires GPT partitioning for a target drive (which is the partitioning method used for my two M.2 950 Pro NVMe drives).  I had failed to do this when installing my 850 Pro drive with a single "data" partition, since GPT was not critical for this use.  But to be a bootable Windows partition on a UEFI machine, it has to be partitioned with GPT.

 

02_Cannot-install-Win10-to-MBR-disk.jpg

 

So, once again, Partition Wizard to the rescue.  A quick "convert MBR disk to GPT disk" operation on the drive, and I was ready to give the Win10 install a second try.  And this time the installer was perfectly satisfied with my choice of target on this Disk 0 partition.  Note that this is a DIFFERENT PHYSICAL DRIVE than my existing Win7 and Win10 partitions and Boot Manager already live on.  I clicked NEXT, and the install proceeded normally.

 

04_Target-2nd-drive-after-convert-GPT.jpg

 

05_Installing-new-Win10.jpg

 

06_New-Win10-first-time.jpg

 

Once the install completed, a reboot revealed the following newly updated Boot Manager menu showing the newly installed second Win10 at the top of the list, reset to be the new pre-selected "default" boot option by the Win10 installer.

 

07_Boot-Manager-two-Win10.jpg

 

I then used EasyBCD 2.3 to modify the entries on the boot menu in order to clarify what each item was (i.e. to distinguish the two different Win10's which now appeared).  I also converted the Boot Manager presentation to use the new Metro-style GUI version of boot loader (as opposed to my current text-mode Win7 style) as became available with Win8.  (NOTE: please excuse my mistake in incorrectly using DISK2 and DISK3 to distinguish my drives; what's important is that the second Win10 is clearly on a different physical drive than the first Win10 and Win7 and Boot Manager.)

 

P70-Boot-Manager-two-Win10s-and-Win7.jpg

 

And then I rebooted, which produced a Boot Manager menu screen that now looked as follows:

 

09_Boot-Manager-menu.jpg

 

So, I have to say... I see zero evidence that there is anything preventing multiple versions of Windows from being installed on multiple physical drives, ending up with one single Boot Manager partition on the "boot drive" (as set in the BIOS boot device sequence list) presenting a menu that points to all bootable Windows system partitions on either the same drive or different drives.

 

The only apparent wrinkle is that when running on a UEFI BIOS machine, that Win10 and Win7 must go on a GPT-partitioned drive.  This is so that the EFI System_Reserved partition for Boot Manager can be used.  So as long as you are not targeting a new Windows install to a partition on an MBR drive but rather are targeting a partition on a GPT drive, as far as I can see there is no truth to the "rumor" stated earlier in this thread that ever since Win7 there has been an inability to do what I have just done successfully.

 

Q.E.D.

 

Case closed, as far as I'm concerned.

 

NOTE: Having proven successfully that there's no reason any number of Windows can be installed to partitions on any number of physical drives, I have now UNDONE everything I did above, to get myself back to where I was previously (i.e. with only one Win10 installed).  I used EasyBCD again to remove the second Win10 entry and also to set Win7 as my default Windows.  And I also used Partition Wizard to delete that second Win10 partition, and then to resize the J partition LARGER, to reclaim all of that 100+GB of space I had previously used for the experimental Win10 install.

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