cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Reply
unit88888888
Serial Port
Posts: 215
Registered: ‎08-24-2010
Location: New york
Views: 2,760
Message 1 of 7

Safe to unplug laptop that is plugged in?

Hi, just wondering if it is safe to unplug the laptop from a charger when I want to take the laptop out. If there is confusion what I meant, for example I am currently charging my laptop and its at lets say at 100%....and I got to take the laptop out and I did not first unplug the charger from the outlet first and turned off my PC and THEN unplugged..instead I just unplugged my laptop from the AC adapter from the yellow port.

 

Thanks

 

Guru
Posts: 9,598
Registered: ‎12-26-2009
Location: CA
Views: 2,737
Message 2 of 7

Re: Safe to unplug laptop that is plugged in?

I just unplug the laptop regardless of whether or not it's on or off. (A few times without putting the battery in first, d'oh!)

 

I think it's a different story with the slice and/or UltraBay batteries.


W520: 2960XM, Q2000M @ 1091/1380, 32GB RAM, 500GB&750GB HDD & 500GB SSD, FHD&MB168B+
X61T: L7500, 4GB RAM, 500GB HDD, XGA screen, Ultrabase
W550s: 5600U, K620M at 1164/1281, 16GB RAM, 512GB SSD, 3K touchscreen
X200s: SL9400, 6GB RAM, 64GB SD card, WXGA+ screen
TPT1: 1839-23U
Community SeniorMod
Community SeniorMod
Posts: 7,033
Registered: ‎01-13-2008
Location: US
Views: 2,725
Message 3 of 7

Re: Safe to unplug laptop that is plugged in?

Hey, I'm glad you asked Smiley Happy  Here's how fussy I am:  I always unplug from the AC wall outlet (or extension cord, surge protector, whatever) before unplugging the power brick from the laptop.

 

Someone convinced me 100 years (or so) ago to always unplug appliances at the wall first.  The thinking is this: that massive 2 or 3 pronged wall plug can tolerate a little spark without damage.  The connector at the laptop OTOH is handling much higher currents.  The spark there can carry of a tiny bit of metal or plating each time it happens.

 

After an eternity of unplugging at the laptop, the connector could (theoretically) be damaged.

 

As to whether the laptop should be on or off, who cares?

 

Z.


The large print: please read the Community Participation Rules before posting. Include as much information as possible: model, machine type, operating system, and a descriptive subject line. Do not include personal information: serial number, telephone number, email address, etc.


The fine print: I do not work for, nor do I speak for Lenovo. Unsolicited private messages will be ignored - questions and answers belong in the forum so that others may contribute and benefit. ... GeezBlog

 

  Communities:   English    Deutsch    Español    Português    Русскоязычное    Česká    Slovenská    Українська   Polski    Moto English

unit88888888
Serial Port
Posts: 215
Registered: ‎08-24-2010
Location: New york
Views: 2,688
Message 4 of 7

Re: Safe to unplug laptop that is plugged in?

ahh ok thanks for the input guys. well i have only been doing this i think for less than 10 times. hopefully nothing serious dmg has been done to the laptop connector >_>. guess ill revert to the old traditional method of first unplugging from the walloutlet and then unplug from the connector.

amb00
Paper Tape
Posts: 5
Registered: ‎04-28-2011
Location: romania
Views: 2,677
Message 5 of 7

Re: Safe to unplug laptop that is plugged in?

I don't think it matters anymore. I think there are safe circuits that prevent more current from damaging the main circuit. Of course there is an upper limit to that current but the so called sparks that can happen (spikes of current), won't dammage it. The current that gets out of the laptop charger is smaller then what you get from the wall.

I always unplug from the laptop first. I'm thinking that if something happens when i unplug from the wall and the charger can't stop it, i don't want my laptop to be ruined.

 

Btw, I leave it plugged in for most of the time (time = weeks).

amb00
Paper Tape
Posts: 5
Registered: ‎04-28-2011
Location: romania
Views: 2,675
Message 6 of 7

Re: Safe to unplug laptop that is plugged in?

for zoltanthegypsy:

What do you mean the laptop is handling much higher currents then at the wall? The current that gets into the laptop is smaller then what you get at the wall because of the transformer (charger).

Or maybe I don't understand what you mean.

Community SeniorMod
Community SeniorMod
Posts: 7,033
Registered: ‎01-13-2008
Location: US
Views: 2,668
Message 7 of 7

Re: Safe to unplug laptop that is plugged in?

Hey,  my reply to  unit88888888 was intended to be partly (maybe mostly) humorous.  That doesn't make it untrue, though.

 

Let's suppose that a laptop requires 100 Watts to charge and/or operate.  That's higher than the reality, but it will make the numbers a little easier to work with.  Around here, the wall power is 110-120VAC.  So the power brick needs to draw approximately 1 Amp from the wall.  You may say that it only draws .8A or so,  but it isn't 100% efficient, so cut me a little slack here Smiley Very Happy

 

The laptop in this discussion operates on 20VDC  from the power brick.  It therefore has to draw 5A to get its 100 Watts.

 

So the current that gets into the laptop is 5 times as much as the current from the wall.  The voltage at the wall is higher than that at the laptop, but the current at the laptop is much higher than that at the wall.  Wattage = voltage * current.

 

BTW, that power brick/charger/regulated DC power supply isn't a "transformer".  It may contain a transformer, but it's much more complex than that.  It's an  AC/DC (in some cases also DC/DC) converter with an internal voltage regulator and some other fun stuff.  A "transformer" can only provide AC to AC conversion.

 

There, now, aren't you sorry you asked Smiley Very Happy  (I should probably apologize for my earlier post.  I was trying to mix humor with being very literal, sort of like this post.  Maybe that's not so clever after all...)

 

Z.

 

[edit] Corrected bogus reference to Ohm's law.  I know better...


The large print: please read the Community Participation Rules before posting. Include as much information as possible: model, machine type, operating system, and a descriptive subject line. Do not include personal information: serial number, telephone number, email address, etc.


The fine print: I do not work for, nor do I speak for Lenovo. Unsolicited private messages will be ignored - questions and answers belong in the forum so that others may contribute and benefit. ... GeezBlog

 

  Communities:   English    Deutsch    Español    Português    Русскоязычное    Česká    Slovenská    Українська   Polski    Moto English

Check out current deals!


Shop current deals

Top Kudoed Authors