cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Reply
Bowtye8
Paper Tape
Posts: 13
Registered: ‎06-01-2013
Location: USA
Views: 18,215
Message 11 of 51

Re: 512 gb SSD upgrade options for 1st gen X1 Carbon

Just wanted to give a small update and say thanks.

I purchased the above adapter and 512gb SSD msata drive. 

Used Macrium Reflect to image the current 256gb drive to a usb drive while live in windows.

Installed hardware and booted with rescue usb and then searched for my image.  Loaded up. Took about an hour.

Rebooted and up and running.  Just had to extend the vol in disk mgnt to see the full 512gb.(only showed 256gb at first)

Everything up and running justs like it was on the 256gb drv.

 

Thanks for the assist Rich!!

 

rsa4046
Fanfold Paper
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎07-13-2016
Location: DE
Views: 18,056
Message 12 of 51

Re: 512 gb SSD upgrade options for 1st gen X1 Carbon

Rich, thank you for posting all this information on upgrading the SSD of X1 Carbon (First Gen). I intend to get the mSATA adapter that you described above (e.g., Microsatacables.com), but I just wanted to ask if the 42mm length you described for the mSATA drives is a maximum limit. I haven't yet had a look under the hood of my X1 carbon (model 3460-82G) to verify, but as you've been able to accomplish this upgrade I thought I would just ask.

Also, I've been looking at possible 512GB candidates available here in Germany, and I've come up with these:

1. Crucial CT500MX200SSD3, about $230 (Crucial link)

2. Samsung 850 EVO MZ-M5E500BW, about $180 (Samsung link)

However, I haven't been able to find info on the exact length of these -- I think they actually may actually be c. 50mm. Would either still fit with this adapter, and do you know of other mSATA SSDs that would?

You mentioned in your post that there is only one 42mm mSATA drive available in 512GB capacity -- can you tell me which one this is? Thanks very much for any information you can share. //rolf

Bowtye8
Paper Tape
Posts: 13
Registered: ‎06-01-2013
Location: USA
Views: 18,049
Message 13 of 51

Re: 512 gb SSD upgrade options for 1st gen X1 Carbon

rsa4046
Fanfold Paper
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎07-13-2016
Location: DE
Views: 18,038
Message 14 of 51

Re: 512 gb SSD upgrade options for 1st gen X1 Carbon

Thank you for the speedy reply and the links! Kind regards //rolf

rsa4046
Fanfold Paper
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎07-13-2016
Location: DE
Views: 17,986
Message 15 of 51

Re: 512 gb SSD upgrade options for 1st gen X1 Carbon

Bowtye, thanks again for your help previously. I've installed the adapter and the new 512 GB, transferred an image of the previous disk using Macrium Reflect, and the system came up just fine. However, I am now wondering how to alter Lenovo's default partition layout, which is:

 

[1.46     GB] SYSTEM_DRV: The active, system partition

[144.54 GB] ( C: ) Windows obviously lives here: the boot drive

[13.67   GB] ( D: ) Lenovo_Recovery

[8.00     GB] This partition is not named, described as a Hiberation Partition

 

The balance of the 512GB disk is obviously empty, unused space. In Windows parlance, the partitions above are layout=Simple, type=Basic, and by default the partition table is configured as MBR (thus maximum primary partition number = 4). Ideally, I would like to extend the C: partition to use the currently unoccupied space, but to do so means moving partitions around. I am wondering what you or others who have installed larger disks have done:

1. Did you eliminate the Recovery Partition? This is really not needed at this point anyway (and this would conveniently reduce the primary partition count by one).

2. What about the 8.00 GB Hibernation Partition? Do you know if this partition is necessary (e.g., is it used in Windows "Sleep" mode, etc.). Can it be moved or eliminated?

 

Sorry for all the questions, but as you must have confronted similar choices I am hoping you can provide some guidance. Thanks again for all your help.

 

Highlighted
rsa4046
Fanfold Paper
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎07-13-2016
Location: DE
Views: 17,944
Message 16 of 51

Re: 512 gb SSD upgrade options for 1st gen X1 Carbon

f0.pngUpgrading the X1 Carbon’s proprietary SSD (“first generation”, circa 2012, 180 GB) to mSATA 512 GB 

Hardware upgrade parts used:

Crucial mSATA SSD 512GB CT512M550SSD3 (still available from some vendors such as Newegg; other, newer SSD cards may work, but check the form factor, length and thickness of the card), about $200; mSATA SSD to 26 Pin Adapter SD5SG2 card, about $15 (part # MS-LEN-26PX1 from Micro SATA Cables http://www.microsatacables.com/msata-ssd-to-26pin-adapter-as-sd5sg2-from-lenovo-x1-carbon-ultra-ms-len-26px1).

 

As I received a lot of help from people on these forums, I thought I would try to return the favor in the form of a detailed "how to", recording how I did this upgrade. It is no different from the solution posted above, simply more detailed. The parts are listed above. I've tried to number the steps sequentially, together with accompanying photos. Some steps may be child's play to some readers, but for sake of completeness I've included virtually everything.

1.  Make sure that the laptop battery is fully charged. Also check any Windows settings that cause the laptop to power on automatically when the lid is opened are (temporarily) disabled.

2. Make a disk image using Macrium Reflect, and store on an external USB drive.

3. Make a boot DVD-ROM also using Macrium Reflect, selecting the version of Windows you will be restoring. Test that you can boot from this DVD (interrupt the boot process with the ENTER key to select the boot device), and access (mount, read) the disk image you made earlier. You can also verify the backup image at this point. Don’t skip these steps. After verifying that you can read the disk image OK, power off the laptop, disconnect all drives, and disconnect the AC power cord.

4. With all cables disconnected and the laptop powered off and lid closed, flip the laptop over, and carefully remove the seven Philips head screws from the back.

5. Flip the unit right side up, open the lid, and fold it essentially flat. Place a clean paper towel over the screen for protection; you will be placing the keyboard on top of this surface. 

6. The keyboard is removed by carefully inserting a thin shim into the seam when it joins the case. An old credit card or piece of stiff plastic works well here. (Note that with the screws removed (step 4), the keyboard is only held in place by internal clips and a ribbon cable). Work your way around all sides of the case, carefully releasing the internal clips that secure the keyboard bezel. Don't rush, the bezel is easy to remove but fragile.

7. Once all the clips have been released, carefully flip the keyboard and rest it atop the screen’s protected surface. There is no need to detach the ribbon cable; but it is fragile, so be sure not to twist or deform this connection during this

step. At this point the unit will look something like this (Fig. 1, excuse the poor focus).

f1.png

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8. Fig. 2A shows the existing SSD still intact. There is a 3-wire cable (fingerprint reader?) secured by a plastic clip that you will need to move aside to gain access to the single mounting screw that secures the SSD to the motherboard. Carefully pry the clip open slightly and pull the wires aside – they are also fragile, so take your time. Once the cable is out of the way you can remove the mounting screw.

f2a.png

 

9. With the mounting screw removed, the SSD can be removed by carefully sliding it out of the bus slot, wiggling slightly side-to-side if necessary. Your view should be similar to Figure 2B. Once free, set it aside for storage, using the anti-static container of the new unit if available.

f2b.png

 

10. Remove the two small screws that will attach the SSD to the mSATA X1 Carbon adapter board. Then attach the adapter in place of the old SSD, carefully sliding it into the bus slot. Secure with the mounting screw. Your work should now look like Figure 3.

f3.png

 

 11. Fit the new SSD securely into the adapter bus (Figure 4A), and secure with the two small screws removed previously. Your finished work should now look like Figure 4B.

f4.png

 

 12. Figure 5: restore the 3-wire cable and secure with plastic tab as before. You’re now more than halfway complete. You can now reverse previous steps of keyboard removal: carefully flip the keyboard back into position, taking care not to deform the ribbon cable, clip the keyboard back into position, and reattach fasteners to back of laptop.

 

f5.png

 

 13. With the keyboard back in place, reattach AC power and DVD drive. Boot the machine – because the new SSD drive is not yet bootable, the BIOS should default to the DVD drive and boot. Once Macrium Reflect is loaded, attach the USB drive, and browse to find the image saved in step 2. At this point you have some options. My original disk had 4 partitions: the SYSTEM_DRV partition (1.46 GB), the Windows boot partition (C:, 144.54 GB); the Lenovo_Recovery partition (13.67 GB), and a hibernation partition used (so I understand) by Intel’s Rapid Start Technology. If I restored this table, in order to reutilize all of the space available I would have had to (at least) move these partitions around to get a contiguous free space adjacent to the original Windows C: partition. Because I did not now need Lenovo’s recovery partition, the easiest solution within Macrium Reflect was simply to restore only the first two partitions, eliminating both the recovery partition (now not needed anyway, with a complete disk image) and the hibernation partition, which I thought I could reintroduce at a later time if need be. Once these partitions were restored to the new SSD, I powered the machine down, disconnected the DVD and USB drives and booted.

14. Once Windows has booted, gaining access to the full disk space was simple: start disk management console, and display the existing partition table. Figure 6 shows mine, with the SYSTEM_DRV and C: partition restored, and 330.93 GB of unallocated space.

 

fig6.png

15. Right click on the C: partition (here Boot volume in the figure), and select “Extend volume …” (Figure 7).

fig7.png 

16. This should bring up the Extend Volume wizard (Figure 8):

fig8.png

 

17. Within the wizard, I selected the disk and the maximum space available (Figure 9):

 

fig9.png

 

18. Choose Next to complete (Figure 10):

fig10.png

 

19. And we’re done! (Figure 11):

fig11.png

 

 

DNash
What's DOS?
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎11-03-2016
Location: US
Views: 17,487
Message 17 of 51

Re: 512 gb SSD upgrade options for 1st gen X1 Carbon

Hi All,

Thanks Fanfold Paper for the recipe on this. I have acquired the adapter board but have have tried unsuccessfully to obtain the Crucial mSATA SSD 512GB (CT512M550SSD3). Newegg cancelled both of my orders, from two separate vendors in their marketplace.  

So my question is: Does anybody know an actual reliable source for this Crucial SSD - or is there aother form-factor compatible option that you have verified fits in this restricted place?

Thanks for any help!

David Nash

TripleX1
Token Ring
Posts: 65
Registered: ‎06-13-2016
Location: GB
Views: 17,454
Message 18 of 51

Re: 512 gb SSD upgrade options for 1st gen X1 Carbon

You can use any mSATA SSD - any reason you want this Crucial? M550 is EOL, see the MX200 they are both SEDs and work just fine with hardware BitLocker for example.

 

Otherwise you can get the newer M.2/SATA adapters for X1.

DNash
What's DOS?
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎11-03-2016
Location: US
Views: 17,433
Message 19 of 51

Re: 512 gb SSD upgrade options for 1st gen X1 Carbon

Only because earlier posts indicated it fit and this space is really contrained on height to prevent the kybd from bulging.

I have no preference other than height. It is going to sit on the aforementioned adapter board.  Thank you. 

Topocalma
What's DOS?
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎03-27-2017
Location: DE
Views: 16,342
Message 20 of 51

Re: 512 gb SSD upgrade options for 1st gen X1 Carbon

The above infos are very valuable and helped me upgrade my SSD (first gen x1 Carbon 128GB). 

 

I wanted to share a few insights and clarifications that I gathered:

 

1. The easiest way I believe is to simply buy an €9 external mSata to USB cable and to clone the 'old' harddrive completely to the new SSD using macrium reflect. This avoids pains I had trying to create a bootable USB device and the need for an external harddrive that has sufficient capacity for an image. Mine looked like this: 

 

 

 

Specifically, I:

- Purchased an mSATA SSD to USB 3.0 Externe SSD Konverter Festplatte Alu Gehäuse Cover Schwarz. It simply allows to connect the new mSata SSD to the computer via USB, the clone (and not image!) can then directly be written to the new SSD

- Created a clone using marcium reflect writing it to the new SSD

- Opened the computer as per aboves instructions and replaced the new with the old SSD. It booted without a problem

- Note: I did have to 'activate' the free 'new' space on the new SSD using Aomei free edition (a partition management tool)

 

2. Hardware:

- I purchased an adapter mSata- SD5SG2 such as this one: 

Any of these adapters will do, important is only they do "mSata to  SD5SG2". Comparing the pictures will be enough. 

ATTENTION: The adapter will cause the keypad to bulge a bit, creating a visible bulge on the right side of the keyboard. Funtion is not impared, but it does not look so nice... It might be possible to sand off 0,5mm to aliviate the issue, i might try that at some point. 

 

Any mSata disk (I bought a Samsung 850 EVO ssd) will do.

 

 

 

Check out current deals!


Shop current deals

Top Kudoed Authors