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richavalue
Blue Screen Again
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎09-10-2016
Location: US
Views: 2,366
Message 1 of 5

Whats difference between lenovo x y and z series

Hi All,

 

I want to upgrade my laptop and i like lenovo but there are so many models and am confused what to buy. Can anybody help me in explaining what x y and z series and also whats ideapad and thinkpad?

 

Thanks,

Richa

David_J_W
802.11n
Posts: 118
Registered: ‎05-22-2016
Location: GB
Views: 2,310
Message 2 of 5

Re: Whats difference between lenovo x y and z series

If you go to your country's online Lenovo store, choose Products -> Laptops, there is likely a "View all laptops" option that explains the differences. Here is the page on the Lenovo US store (click).

 

Roughly speaking, IdeaPad are Lenovo's consumer range and ThinkPad are Lenovo's business range. The business machines tend to be more robust, a little more conservative in design and are sometimes lighter for a similar specification, but they come at a higher price than the consumer machines. There are also Yoga, which are computers with multiple modes based on a foldback screen - they come in Yoga (consumer) and ThinkPad Yoga (business).

 

The various series are explained in the Lenovo online store. ThinkPad X are the ultraportable business machines - high performance, small form factor, lightweight but rather pricey.

richavalue
Blue Screen Again
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎09-10-2016
Location: US
Views: 2,301
Message 3 of 5

Re: Whats difference between lenovo x y and z series

Thanks for valuable reply. I really appreciate. Am from US and the link You provided helped me to see differences. Also thanks for detailed explainantion. As of now I own Lenovo 3000 Y410 and because it falls under end of licence its no more supported by lenovo and its getting difficult for me to find suitable drivers as i installed windows 10 on it. 

 

I would like to know which laptop is best in long run and has better resale value. If not better resale value, am ok if at least hardware parts can be upgraded.

 

For Example: For my existing laptop:

1. I cant upgrade RAM not more than 4 Gigs i.e., 2+2 Gigs. 

2. Can't upgrade CPU as its soldered.

3. Can't upgrade GPU etc.,

Also am looking for laptop that has both SSD and HDD. Am thinking to have 250 GB ssd (similar to primary drive where OS can be installed) and HDD where I can store videos, music, games etc. Am not sure if I can do this on my Lenovo 3000 Y410 laptop. I really appreciate any help provided.

 

Thanks,

Richa

David_J_W
802.11n
Posts: 118
Registered: ‎05-22-2016
Location: GB
Views: 2,288
Message 4 of 5

Re: Whats difference between lenovo x y and z series

Laptops have never been easily upgradable, and the modern move to smaller, lighter form factors increasingly means more items are soldered.

 

CPU and GPU are not going to be upgradable other than with a system board swap - at which point you might as well buy a new laptop.

 

Memory might be upgradable, but only so far. Increasingly, memory is soldered, as that helps to produce a smaller and more robust machine.

 

Hard disks are increasingly disappearing from laptops as solid state drives plummet in price. This post is being written on an X1 Yoga with a 1TB NVMe SSD. That's a very expensive option at present, but 500GB 2.5 inch SATA SSDs are now inexpensive even in the retail marketplace. Space for an SSD and a hard disk is increasingly rare - you can use the M.2 WWAN card slot in some Lenovo machines for a SSD, but often you cannot boot from that SSD.

 

 

Resale values for used laptops are typically pretty miserable - a small fraction of what you paid for the hardware. By the time someone is ready to sell a laptop on, it's typically pretty tired and a long way behind even inexpensive new hardware.

 

My advice is to buy the machine you need now with a reasonable allowance for your needs to grow over the usable life of the machine. If you have specialist needs, this will likely steer you to more expensive hardware. I use computationally intensive software, lots of virtual machines and I need an active pen, touchscreen and a small and light machine, so it was a toss up between a ThinkPad X1 Yoga and a ThinkPad P40 Yoga. I opted to do without a dedicated GPU and went for the X1 Yoga - the non-Lenovo option I considered was Microsoft Surface Book.

 

 

You might be able to upgrade the RAM in your Y410 - I'm not familiar with that series, though I understand it is third or fourth generation Core i based, which makes it not too shabby. If you can upgrade to 8-16GB of RAM with sufficient storage for your needs and there are drivers for all the key hardware in your chosen version of Windows, you can probably get a few more years of usage out of the machine. However, you indicate this is not the case; driver support for laptops typically tails off rapidly once the model is superseded (especially for consumer models) and you seem unsure about memory upgdare potentials.

 

It's important to remember the sunk cost fallacy (Google it if you don't know what I mean). You cannot recover what you paid for your existing computer; at most you will get the slender resale value of a consumer laptop that's arguably three generations old (Intel have started to release seventh generation Core i series processors, though few machines use them at present and there are only modest changes from the sixth generation). What the fallacy reminds you is that what you spent on your existing laptop is irrelevant - what matters is what it is worth now, whether it meets your needs today, also the costs and benefits of any possible upgrades.

 

The key question is what is more cost-effective; upgrading what you have in an attempt to extend its life, or starting again. To be honest, it sounds like you have reached the limits of where you are now, especially if you choose to stick with Windows 10. Even if you upgrade an older machine, it will likely have a shorter usable life than new hardware - also the older machine will have an old battery and little or no warrantly left.

 

If the machine is good enough for your use other than being a bit short of memory and/or storage, an upgrade might be worthwhile. If not, it might be best to consider a new laptop when you can afford one.

richavalue
Blue Screen Again
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎09-10-2016
Location: US
Views: 2,260
Message 5 of 5

Re: Whats difference between lenovo x y and z series

Hi David,

 

Thanks for such a great explaination and every word You said has lot of meaning in it. You guide me very well. I really appreciate Your help. Thank You so much. It's hard to find people like You who share knowledge in right way and You did it really well. I will go ahead and look for cost-effective laptop.

 

Thanks,

Richa

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