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P710 POST codes

2021-01-30, 3:29 AM

I have a P710 that I am trying to upgrade the cpu on. 

 

I removed the working CPU, installed the new one, and it wouldn't POST. I put the old one back in, and now that won't POST either. So, now I'm dead in the water.

 

No dirt or bent pins that I can see. 

 

So, I'd like to see if it's failing during POST.

 

Does anyone know if the P710 spits out the POST codes anywhere (PCI 80h, PCIe, USB, LPC, or?)

 

I know the Px20 series has a display for this, unfortunately that's not my platform. :(

 

Thanks! 

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4998 Posts

02-22-2010

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Re:P710 POST codes

2021-02-04, 4:10 AM

Further...B7 is a configuration reset of NVRAM settings.  Typically this checkpoint refers to system memory.

 

My suggestion would be to pull all DIMMs and try to boot to see if the system responds with the expected "no memory" error beep sequence of (3 shorter beeps + 1 long beep if I recall correctly).  If that doesn't happen, then your CPU(s) are not POSTing correctly and you likely have a CPU or socket issue going on.  If you do hear that error beep, then I'd recommend installing DIMMs back one at a time following the suggest DIMM slot fill order found on the system label on the inside of the system cover or in the User Guide.  The system will need memory connected to the first logical CPU, but it should be able to boot properly with no memory installed to CPU2.

 

For reference, it would be good to highlight what your current memory configuration is, including DIMM vendor, part number, capacity, type (RDIMM, UDIMM, etc.), and quantity.

 

Could be several factors here that need to be diagnosed and/or ruled out such as a bad DIMM, bad DIMM slot, damaged CPU socket, or even something wrong with the CPU itself (probably unlikely).   So make sure you take a logical approach to each one by adjusting one variable at a time when testing/debugging.

 

 




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129 Posts

01-11-2016

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Re:P710 POST codes

2021-01-31, 0:47 AM

P710 has Diag function by default, but it has no display by default.

Suggestions for the problem of not booting 1. First make sure that the CPU is in SLot 1 near the Rear ODD position
                                      2. Clean the memory cheat again and make sure to install it in slot 1 Mimm
Hope it helps

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Re:P710 POST codes

2021-01-31, 2:19 AM

Thanks for the response. 

 

If I know where the AMI bios sends the POST codes, I can get a device that will display them. Hence my question of where the codes are sent.

 

CPU 1 is at the front, not the rear. Maybe I'm confused about what you're referring to.

 

I've tried removing and reinstalling both DIMM and CPU, same result - no boot. 

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Re:P710 POST codes

2021-02-01, 16:20 PM

What type of CPU are you trying to install in your P710 workstation? 

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Re:P710 POST codes

2021-02-01, 17:16 PM

Old: E5-2620 v3

 

New: Dual E5-2699 v4 (although I am only trying a single one at this point.)

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Re:P710 POST codes

2021-02-01, 18:27 PM

I'm showing both of those generation CPU's should be supported on the P710 platform.  Which CPU socket are you installing the CPU into (front or rear)? 

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Re:P710 POST codes

2021-02-01, 20:08 PM

Front.

 

The "old" CPU was working fine, until I removed it.

 

I actually did get it to boot again yesterday with the old CPU. So, of course I removed it to put the new one in, it didn't POST, put the old back one in, and again wouldn't post. The only thing I'm changing is the CPU. It's very odd. And frustrating. 

 

I've stripped out everything except one DIMM and the video card, and still no luck.

 

Could the way I'm tightening the CPU heat sink screws have something to do with it? That's the only variable that I can think of. I'm tightening opposite corners, but is there a secret to it I'm not aware of?

 

Otherwise, I'm stumped. 

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  • Message 8 of 18

Re:P710 POST codes

2021-02-03, 20:13 PM

I managed to get a Diagnostic file written out the USB port.

 

https://support.lenovo.com/jp/en/solutions/workstation_diagnostics

 

shows the last code as:

 

System Halted [B0B7]

 

"For B0##, the ## represents the BIOS port 80 checkpoint code"

 

which is kind of what I was looking for in the first place, although since "At this time, we do not have a compiled list of checkpoint codes to offer", it doesn't really tell me much or where to go from here.

 

Can anyone give me some guidance on what the B7 means?

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Re:P710 POST codes

2021-02-03, 20:28 PM

Checkpoint code "B0" = system halt

 

Checkpoint code "B7" = Configuration Reset 

 

 

One thing I might would recommend doing would be to try to clear CMOS.  Step-by-step instructions for doing so can be found on page 71 of the HMM:

https://download.lenovo.com/pccbbs/thinkcentre_pdf/p510_p710_hmm.pdf

 

 

 

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  • Message 10 of 18

Re:P710 POST codes

2021-02-04, 4:10 AM

Further...B7 is a configuration reset of NVRAM settings.  Typically this checkpoint refers to system memory.

 

My suggestion would be to pull all DIMMs and try to boot to see if the system responds with the expected "no memory" error beep sequence of (3 shorter beeps + 1 long beep if I recall correctly).  If that doesn't happen, then your CPU(s) are not POSTing correctly and you likely have a CPU or socket issue going on.  If you do hear that error beep, then I'd recommend installing DIMMs back one at a time following the suggest DIMM slot fill order found on the system label on the inside of the system cover or in the User Guide.  The system will need memory connected to the first logical CPU, but it should be able to boot properly with no memory installed to CPU2.

 

For reference, it would be good to highlight what your current memory configuration is, including DIMM vendor, part number, capacity, type (RDIMM, UDIMM, etc.), and quantity.

 

Could be several factors here that need to be diagnosed and/or ruled out such as a bad DIMM, bad DIMM slot, damaged CPU socket, or even something wrong with the CPU itself (probably unlikely).   So make sure you take a logical approach to each one by adjusting one variable at a time when testing/debugging.

 

 




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